Selvaraghavan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Selvaraghavan
Born Selvaraghavan Kasthuri Raja
(1977-03-05) 5 March 1977 (age 37)
Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Other names Sri Raghava
Occupation Film director
Years active 2003–present
Spouse(s)
  • Sonia Agarwal
    (m.2006–2009; divorced)
    Gitanjali Raman
    (m.2011–present)

Selvaraghavan (Tamil: செல்வராகவன்) is an Indian film director who has directed predominantly Tamil films. He is credited as Sri Raghava in Telugu cinema. After writing the script for his father's directorial venture Thulluvadho Ilamai (2002), Selvaraghavan went on to make a series of romantic drama films with Kadhal Kondein (2003) and 7G Rainbow Colony (2004) before also venturing to make coming-of-age films Pudhupettai (2006) and Mayakkam Enna (2011). He has also ventured into making fantasy films, rarely explored in Indian cinema, depicting a fantasy Chola kingdom in Aayirathil Oruvan (2010) and a parallel universe in Irandam Ulagam (2013), this movie is produced by Prasad V. Potluri.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Selvaraghavan is the son of film director Kasthuri Raja, elder brother of actor Dhanush and has two sisters, who are both doctors. On 15 December 2006, he married actress Sonia Agarwal, with whom he had previously worked with on three films. After their two-year marriage Sonia Agarwal and Selvaraghavan filed for divorce with mutual consent in a Chennai family court on 9 August 2009.[2][3] Selvaraghavan married Gitanjali Raman on 19 June 2011, daughter of former Advocate General of Tamil Nadu P. S. Raman. She had worked as his assistant director in Aayirathil Oruvan.[4] The couple have a daughter named Leelavathi born on 19 January 2012.[5] The couple were blessed with a son on 7 October 2013.[6]

Film career[edit]

2002-2004[edit]

Despite coming from a family from the film industry, Selvaraghavan and his sisters were persuaded by his parents to seek a career with an academic background. He subsequently went on to attain a BEng. in Mechanical Engineering, though his exam performances were unremarkable and he acknowledges he was "never going to become one of the best". During his degree, he engaged part-time in different career paths in a process he describes as "soul-searching", before finding satisfaction as a writer.[7] After he graduated in 1997, he approached producers to fund his screenplay writing but was unsuccessful and often remained at home as unemployed graduate. His family faced financial pressures in the early 2000s with his father was out of work, and subsequently they decided to put their remaining earnings into a venture titled Thulluvadho Ilamai (2002), which Selvaraghavan had written. Featuring his brother Dhanush in his first role, alongside Sherin and Abhinay, the film told the coming-of-age story of six high school students and featured a hit soundtrack by Yuvan Shankar Raja. After taking a small opening, the film began to get teen audiences to cinema halls for it's adolescent themes, while also being publicized in quarters as "soft porn" film. It subsequently went on to become a sleeper hit and won positive reviews from critics for breaking the stereotypes of Tamil films.[8] Post-release, Selvaraghavan stated that he had also directed the film but was forced to credit his more established film-maker father Kasthuri Raja as the director, in order to help the project find a distributor.[7]

Following the success of the previous film, the team chose to collaborate again with the psychotic romantic thriller Kaadhal Kondein (2003), credited as Selvaraghavan's first film. The venture, produced by his home production, also marked the first collaboration of Selvaraghavan with cinematographer Arvind Krishna, whom he would later associate with regularly. Selvaraghavan had written the script for the film in the late 1990s and had first narrated the story to Dhanush in their shared bedroom at home, before asking him to play the lead role of Vinod after the success of Thulluvadho Illamai.[9] The story explores the mind of a youth who is mentally and physically abused in his childhood. The lack of a mother's love haunts the protagonist throughout the film as the girl of his infatuation is killed. Becoming a psychopath, he desperately tries to woo his newly found lady love and his efforts culminate in a thrilling climax. The film opened in July 2003 to unanimously positive reviews, with a reviewer from The Hindu noting "his story, screenplay, dialogue and direction are focussed and hit the bull's eye straightway — hardly missing the mark."[10] The film subsequently went on to become a blockbuster and provided career breakthroughs for both Selvaraghavan and Dhanush in the Tamil film industry.[11][12] Since it's release, the film has been remade into several Indian languages, while Selvaraghavan was briefly associated with the Hindi remake to be produced by Boney Kapoor in 2004, but the project did not eventually materialise.[7]

Selvaraghavan's next venture was another juvenile love story, 7G Rainbow Colony, which saw him collaborate with Yuvan Shankar Raja and Arvind Krishna again. He revealed that the film's inspiration came from his college days when he had been fascinated with a Punjabi girl called Ruchika, during his education in KK Nagar.[13][14] He based several of the scenes on real-life happenings with his friends, revealing that the film was "75% biographical" and the lead character was an "average guy" like himself, who "no one would make a film on".[7] He cast Ravi Krishna, son of the film's producer A. M. Rathnam, in the leading role after a successful screen test while choosing to retain Sonia Agarwal as the lead actress, due to her Punjabi origin. The film opened in October 2004 to positive reviews, with a critic from Sify.com noting "Unlike other contemporary film makers running after superstars and making formula films, Selvaraghavan pushes the cinematic envelope and brings savvy freshness to the form, hitherto unexplored".[15] Another reviewer from Rediff.com added "Selvaraghavan has once again displayed his skill making a movie that is touching without being mushy, and believable because of its realism", noting that "7G Rainbow Colony remains with you, disturbs you and lingers like the glowing embers of a fire long burnt."[16] Consequently the film and it's dubbed Telugu version went on to become amongst the most profitable films of the year.[17] Selvaraghavan later committed to begin work on a Hindi version of the film starring Vivek Oberoi in 2007, but the venture subsequently did not materialise.[18][19]

2004-2007[edit]

In 2004, he began pre-production on a gangster film titled Kasimedu for producer Salem A. Chandrasekharan which would feature Ajith Kumar, Dhanush and Bharath in the leading roles. The film was later cancelled, and the director became involved in a legal tussle in 2010 for failing to return his advance payments for the project.[20][21] The following year, he began work on another gangster film titled Oru Naal Oru Kanavu for Lakshmi Movie Makers with Dhanush and Sonia Agarwal, based on the gang culture of North Chennai. The title was later changed to Pudhupettai (2006), with Sneha also selected to play the role of prostitute.[22] Featuring acclaimed technical work by Yuvan Shankar Raja and Arvind Krishna again, the film told the story of a slum kid's growth into a notorious gangster. Talking about the making of the film, Selvaraghavan called it "an experiment" and stated it had "one of the most complicated screenplays", while revealing he was more nervous with the final product in comparison to his previous ventures.[23][24] It also became the first Tamil film to be shot in Super 35 mm instead of the Cinemascope format, as well to be released in digital format.[25][26] The film opened to negative reviews in July 2006, with a reviewer from Sify.com adding it was "heartbreakingly disappointing and is nowhere in the league of his earlier films", citing that it "doesn’t unfold quickly and moves at snail pace, puffs and pants with too many characters, subplots and quite long for a gangster genre film".[27] A reviewer from The Hindu also added "Selvaraghavan dishes out a protracted bloodbath and somehow you feel he has let you down", while the critic at Rediff.com stated the "coming from a director like Selvaraghavan, Puthupettai is unbelievable. He loses grip over the plot and the narration goes haywire".[28][29] It went on to have an average run at the box office despite taking a grand opening, with Selvaraghavan suggesting the excessive bloodshed scenes may have kept family audiences away.[30]

Selvaraghavan then moved on to direct a Telugu film which he had committed to make since 2003 with Venkatesh in the leading role.[31] Titled Aadavari Matalaku Arthale Verule, he wrote the script, taking experiences from life experiences of friends who were unemployed graduates, like the film's main character.[32] Featuring an ensemble cast also including Trisha Krishnan, K. Vishwanath, Swati Reddy and Srikanth; the film marked a move away from Selvaraghavan's hard-hitting films and was a simple romantic drama film. Aadavari Matalaku Arthale Verule opened to positive reviews in April 2007, with critics noting "Selva reads the safe path in AMAV, and is most likely to emerge with a winner."[33] Another reviewer added "Selva Raghavan succeeds in touching the right chord by directing a big hero for the first time", adding "he concentrated on entertainment in the first half and mixed strong emotions in the second half to make sure that audience will have certain positive heaviness in their hearts when they leave the theatre."[34] The film went on to gain recognition at award ceremonies the following year, while becoming amongst the biggest commercial successes in the Telugu film industry for 2007.[35] The film was later remade in Tamil as Yaaradi Nee Mohini (2008) by Selvaraghavan's assistant Mithran Jawahar, with Dhanush, Nayantara and Karthik Kumar in the leading roles.

2007-2011[edit]

After the disappointing reception to his previous Tamil film, Selvaraghavan took a sabbatical to plan future projects and set up a production company, White Elephants along with Yuvan Shankar Raja and Arvind Krishna, whose first project Idhu Maalai Nerathu Mayakkam began filming in November 2006. The team began shoot with Karthi, whose first film Paruthiveeran (2007) was awaiting release, and Sandhya.[36] The film was stalled in early 2007 due to cinematographer Arvind Krishna's decision to leave White Elephants and the project was eventually shelved.[37] In July 2007, Selvaraghavan announced a new film with Karthi and Reemma Sen in the cast, with Ramji replacing regular Arvind Krishna as the cinematographer. The film was titled as Aayirathil Oruvan (2010), and Andrea Jeremiah and Parthiban were also soon after added to the principal cast.[38] Nearly six months after filming began, Yuvan Shankar Raja also left the project after falling out with Selvaraghavan, and was replaced by G. V. Prakash Kumar.[39] After extensive development and pre-production which took four months for scripting,[40] the film started the first schedule in the forests of Chalakudy in Kerala during October 2007.[41] The project developed a reputation for its gruelling shoots, a novel concept in Tamil films, at an early stage of production. Shoots in all regions were tough and demanding for the crew as the film featured more than three thousand junior artistes from a variety of unions across India, with the language barrier becoming a problem.[40] In February 2009, filming was completed after 263 days of shooting; therefore the producers signalled for a summer release but it was postponed by six months.[40] The film, an adventure fantasy, tells the story of an archaeologist, a coolie and a member of the army going in search of the archaeologist's father to a ruined city before they stumble upon the lost Chola civilization and its king and find unexplained links between them and the culture. Uncut, the film was made to run for 220 minutes, but the theatrical release was heavily censored at 183 minutes and upon release in January 2010, the film remarkably gained mixed reviews. Sify.com cited that the film represented "something new in the placid world of Tamil cinema" adding that it "broke away from the shackles of the stereotypes".[42] Selvaraghavan also was praised by the reviewer with claims that "the director transports us to a whole new world and at the end of it all, we are dumb stuck by the visuals, the packaging and the new way of storytelling".[42] Rediff.com gave the film 3.5 out of 5 claiming that viewers should "steel your stomach before [you] watch it" and "regardless of the minor discrepancies, AO is definitely a movie to watch".[43] In contrast, Behindwoods.com gave the film 0.5 out of 5 describing the film as "wildly crass", dismissing that "the underdeveloped script lacks everything – starting from strong plot twists to captive locations to graphics to credibility, above all".[44] The film evoked a strong opening at the box office and gained average collections.

Selvaraghavan also had began pre-production work on a film featuring Vishal and Trisha Krishnan in the lead role in late 2008, however the actor and director called off the project months later after having creative differences.[45] After discussions which had been ongoing for a year, Selvaraghavan announced a collaboration with Vikram in January 2008 and worked on the film's script for a year during the making of Aayirathil Oruvan.[7] The project, dubbed by the media as Sindubad, began shoot in September 2009 in Ladakh, with Swati Reddy signed on as the female lead with Ismail Merchant as music director. Filming continued in caves near the Himalayas with the team facing trouble with the freezing weather conditions, while Selvaraghavan announced that the next schedule would be held abroad in the United States.[46] However in February 2010, the film was momentarily shelved and the project subsequently never took off again after the producer Singanamala Ramesh walked out.[47] Soon after in June 2010 another project announced by Selvaraghavan, a bilingual featuring Rana Daggubati set in 50 BC, was also postponed after the pair felt it was too early to work on the film.[48] In early 2011, Kamal Haasan agreed terms with Selvaraghavan to be the director of the actor's venture Vishwaroopam.[49] Months into the collaboration, he was ousted from the project, with Kamal Haasan unhappy at the director's commitment to the project.[50] Selvaraghavan later noted that he expected creative control of the project, which Kamal Haasan was unwilling to offer him.[51]

2011-present[edit]

In December 2013, Selvaraghavan began pre-production on a new venture titled Alaivarisai produced by Varun Manian, which would feature Silambarasan and Trisha Krishnan in the lead roles. The film has been on hold since May 2014, with Manian announcing that Selvaraghavan had to sort out issues with his previous producers PVP Cinemas, before beginning work on the venture. Selvaraghavan has since been on a hiatus from working on films.[52][53]

Filmography[edit]

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Language Notes
2002 Thulluvadho Ilamai Tamil Writer only
2003 Kaadhal Kondein Tamil Nominated, Filmfare Award for Best Director – Tamil
2004 7G Rainbow Colony Tamil
2006 Pudhupettai Tamil
2007 Aadavari Matalaku Ardhalu Verule Telugu
2008 Yaaradi Nee Mohini Tamil Writer only
2010 Aayirathil Oruvan Tamil Nominated, Filmfare Award for Best Director – Tamil
2011 Mayakkam Enna Tamil Nominated, SIIMA Award for Best Director – Tamil
2013 Irandaam Ulagam Tamil

As lyricist[edit]

Year Song(s) Film
2002 Kann Munnae Eththanai Nilavu Thulluvadho Ilamai
2006 Oru Naalil Vazhkkai Inge Pudhupettai
2010 All songs (except "Thai Thindra Mannae" and "Pemmanae") Aayirathil Oruvan
2011 Naan Sonnadhum Mazhaivandhucha
Voda Voda Dhooram Korayala
Ennena Seidhom Ingu
Kaadhal En Kaadhal (Along with Dhanush)
Mayakkam Enna

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Produced by Prasad V Potluri, the track launch of the Harris Jayraj composed album in the Tamil version Irandam Ulangam happened weeks ago.". www.cinegoer.net. 30 September 2013. 
  2. ^ Karthi is dwarfing me: Suriya
  3. ^ Profile of Selvaraghavan
  4. ^ "She is Selva's Geetanjali: First look – Tamil Movie News". IndiaGlitz. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  5. ^ http://www.indiaglitz.com/channels/tamil/article/76960.html
  6. ^ http://newindianexpress.com/entertainment/tamil/Selvaraghavan-Gitanjali-welcome-a-baby-boy/2013/10/07/article1823284.ece
  7. ^ a b c d e http://www.indiaglitz.com/channels/tamil/article/35967.html
  8. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2002/jul/23thull.htm
  9. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mp/2003/08/20/stories/2003082000060100.htm
  10. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/fr/2003/07/11/stories/2003071101230201.htm
  11. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2003/aug/11south.htm
  12. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2003/aug/06kadhal.htm
  13. ^ http://www.indiaglitz.com/channels/tamil/interview/6177.html
  14. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/tamil/interview.php?id=13589250&cid=2408
  15. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/7-g-rainbow-colony-review-tamil-13590940.html
  16. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2004/oct/21rain.htm
  17. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mp/2005/03/05/stories/2005030502540100.htm
  18. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-cinemaplus/kollywood-goes-the-corporate-way/article3023744.ece
  19. ^ http://www.hindustantimes.com/news-feed/entertainment/i-m-commitment-shy-viveik-oberoi/article1-322598.aspx
  20. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/complete-transcript-of-selvaraghavan-chat-news-tamil-kkfvGfhjidjsi.html
  21. ^ http://www.behindwoods.com/tamil-movie-news-1/jan-10-02/aayirathil-oruvan-selvaraghavan-11-01-10.html
  22. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2005/mar/29spice.htm
  23. ^ http://specials.rediff.com/movies/2006/may/24slid4.htm
  24. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-metroplus/we-are-creative-gamblers/article3187821.ece
  25. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2006/jan/03look.htm
  26. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-tamilnadu/how-technology-enhanced-narrative-in-pudhupettai/article3100315.ece
  27. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/puthupettai-review-tamil-14213747.html
  28. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/review/puth/20060529.htm
  29. ^ http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/article3218388.ece
  30. ^ http://www.behindwoods.com/tamil-movie-news/july-06-04/28-07-06-pudhuppettai.html
  31. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/venky-charms-selvaraghavan-news-telugu-kkfvBWadigfsi.html
  32. ^ http://www.idlebrain.com/celeb/interview/selvaraghavan.html
  33. ^ http://www.rediff.com/movies/2007/apr/30amav.htm
  34. ^ http://www.idlebrain.com/movie/archive/mr-amav.html
  35. ^ http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/entertainment/telugu/movies/previews/Aaduvari-Matalaku-Ardhale-Verule/articleshow/2135856.cms
  36. ^ Pillai, Sridhar (2006). "In a lead role". Chennai, India: The Hindu. Retrieved 18 October 2006. 
  37. ^ "Arvind Krishna and Selvaraghavan part ways". Cinesouth.com. 2007. Archived from the original on 2 September 2007. Retrieved 31 August 2007. 
  38. ^ "Karthi is Ayirathil Oruvan". Indiaglitz.com. 2007. Archived from the original on 27 August 2007. Retrieved 31 August 2007. 
  39. ^ Pillai, Sreedhar (11 June 2009). "Selvaraghavan talks music". Cinesouth.com. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  40. ^ a b c Warrior, Shobha (2010). "'Aayirathil Oruvan was a nightmare to make'". Rediff. Archived from the original on 16 January 2010. Retrieved 13 January 2010. 
  41. ^ Moviebuzz (2007). "'Aayirathil Oruvan` in Chalakudy!". Sify. Archived from the original on 11 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-07. 
  42. ^ a b Moviebuzz (2010). "Aayirathil Oruvan-Review". Sify. Archived from the original on 17 January 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  43. ^ Srinivasan, Pavithra (2010). "Aayirathil Oruvan is not for the faint hearted". Rediff. Archived from the original on 16 January 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  44. ^ "Aayirathil Oruvan Review". Behindwoods. 2010. Archived from the original on 16 January 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  45. ^ http://www.indiaglitz.com/called-off-my-project-with-selvaraghavan--vishal-telugu-news-44811
  46. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/snow-plays-spoilsport-with-selvaraghavan-news-tamil-kkfrqwhbbei.html
  47. ^ http://behindwoods.com/tamil-movie-news-1/nov-12-02/selvaraghavan-vikram-10-11-12.html
  48. ^ "Rana Daggubati: B'wood called me first – The Times of India". The Times of India. 
  49. ^ Pillai, Sreedhar (29 January 2011). "Kamal's next with Selva?". The Times of India. Retrieved 29 August 2011. 
  50. ^ "Kamal's trilingual Vishwaroopam". Behindwoods. 10 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  51. ^ http://behindwoods.com/tamil-movie-news-1/nov-12-02/vishwaroopam-selvaraghavan-09-11-12.html
  52. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/str-and-selvaraghavan-team-up-news-tamil-nmoiCvihabbsi.html
  53. ^ http://www.sify.com/movies/str-selvaraghavan-film-put-on-hold-news-tamil-ofnq1Phebdfsi.html

External links[edit]