Texas Tom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Texas Tom
Tom and Jerry series
TexasTomTitle.JPG
The reissue title card of Texas Tom
Directed by William Hanna
Joseph Barbera
Produced by Fred Quimby
Story by William Hanna
Joseph Barbera
Music by Scott Bradley
Animation by Kenneth Muse
Irven Spence
Ray Patterson
Ed Barge
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date(s) United States March 11, 1950, November 1957 (Re-release)
Color process Technicolor
Running time 6:34
Language English
Preceded by Saturday Evening Puss
Followed by Jerry and the Lion

Texas Tom is a 1950 one-reel animated cartoon and is the 49th Tom and Jerry short directed by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera and produced by Fred Quimby. It was animated by Kenneth Muse, Irven Spence, Ray Patterson and Ed Barge and released to theatres on March 11, 1950. Excerpts of this cartoon are seen in two other Tom and Jerry shorts, Smitten Kitten and Cruise Cat; both instances with altered audio.

Plot[edit]

Tom and Jerry are engaged in some Western-flavored cat-and-mouse games (props such as lassoes, spurs, prickly pear cactus, and revolver pistols are involved) when Tom spots a pretty cowgirl cat. Overcome with lust, Tom dresses up in his best cowboy duds and tries to impress the cowgirl, but Jerry sabotages his efforts. Tom takes out tobacco and rolls it up on a piece of paper, then uses Jerry's tongue to stick it closed, Tom smokes it and breathes out the smoke to spell "Howdy" as The cowgirl is flustered and giggly. At one point he sings a song for her on a guitar but has a record player secretly playing the song for him, Jerry then takes the chance to mess with the speed of the recorder to make Tom sing fast and slow, causing him to whack Jerry with his guitar, and BRANDS him in his rear. Tom chases after Jerry for humiliating him and tries to lasso the mouse. Jerry manages to evade capture, and throws the lasso around the left horn of a nearby bull. When Tom is confronted by the angry bull, he tries to flee, but when he finds himself cornered, he resigns himself to his fate. With Tom out of commission, Jerry, now wearing his own cowboy duds, waves his hat over to Toodles, then excitedly runs up to her face, grabs her by the cheeks, presses his lips onto the cowgirl's red lips, giving her a big kiss, and rides off into the sunset on Tom's back.

External links[edit]