Uruguay national rugby union team

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Uruguay
Union Rugby Uruguay Logo.svg
Union Unión de Rugby del Uruguay
Nickname(s) Teros
Emblem(s) Southern Lapwing
Coach(es) Uruguay Pablo Lemoine
Captain(s) Nicolás Klappenbach
Most caps Rodrigo Sánchez (60)
Top scorer Federico Sciarra (259)
Team kit
Change kit
First international
 Chile 21 - 3 Uruguay 
(1948-06-02)
Largest win
 Paraguay 6 - 102 Uruguay 
(2011-05-14)
Largest defeat
 South Africa 134 - 3 Uruguay 
(2005-06-11)
World Cup
Appearances 2 (First in 1999)
Best result 3rd in pool 1999

The Uruguay national rugby union team is the representative side of Uruguay, governed by the Unión de Rugby del Uruguay. They have been playing international rugby since 1948. Their jersey is blue and black and they are known as Los Teros. They qualified twice for the Rugby World Cup, in 1999 and 2003. Uruguay won the South American Rugby Championship in 1981, the only time that a team other than Argentina won it. They came second on 19 occasions and third the remaining 9. As yet, Uruguay have never beaten Argentina in an official match between the two nations, despite some close results.

Their home stadium is Estadio Charrúa in Montevideo and holds up to 14,000 people.

History[edit]

1940s - 1960s[edit]

Uruguay made their official international debut in 1948, in a game against Chile, which Uruguay lost 21-3. Following their debut match, they return to competition in the Pan American Games, first against the more experienced Argentina, resulting in a 0-62 loss. Uruguay then faced Chile for the second time, defeating them by 8-3. The final match of the competition was a 17-10 win over Brazil. Uruguay thus became runners up in the first unofficial South American Rugby Championship.

Uruguay, after a four years hiatus, played Chile in 1956, who defeated them by 6-3. In 1958, they played for the first official South American Rugby Championship, in a pool of three countries. They first played Chile, this time losing by 9-34. The "Teros" met again Argentina, having another loss, this time by 3-50. Uruguay managed to defeat Peru (10-6) in the last game.

In 1960, Uruguay faced for the first time one of the powers of the Northern Hemisphere rugby, France XV, losing by 0-59 in Montevideo during a South American tour. Uruguay after this match entered their second South American Rugby Championship. They first won Brazil in a close game (11-8), losing then to Chile (5-28) and Argentina (3-36), in the closest result to then between both countries.

1970s - 1980s[edit]

The 1970s started off with a win over Paraguay in 1971, which was followed by a win and loss against Chile and a win against Brazil. They also played Argentina twice in the 1970s. However, they won all their matches except for those against Argentina, as well as losing one game against Chile and drawing another. However, the next game against Argentina, two years later in 1979, Uruguay came close to defeating the Pumas, going down by just three points, the final score being 19 to 16.

The 1980s started off with a 54 to 14 win over Paraguay, which resulted in a winning streak that was stopped by Argentina in 1983. In 1985, France visited Montevideo for a second time to play the Teros, beating the locals 34-6. Another short undefeated streak occurred over 1987/1989, which was broken by a 19 to 17 loss against Chile. This was followed by a sound loss to Argentina and loss to a new opponent, the United States Eagles.

1990s-present[edit]

The Tero, emblem of the Uruguayan National Rugby Team

The 1990s started off with wins against of Chile, Brazil and Paraguay. This was followed by more wins over their traditional opponents, though Uruguay still lost to Argentina, they also played Canada in a competitive 28 to 9 loss in 1995. Uruguay played some of the bigger nations such as Argentina, Canada and the United States, although the Canada and U.S. games were a lot closer than some of their previous encounters. A huge success for them was qualifying for the 1999 Rugby World Cup in Wales. They won their pool fixture against Spain, Uruguay finished third in their pool.

Uruguay came within 10 points of Argentina in 2001, and also played nations such as Italy in the same year. Uruguay won most of their matches against their traditional Americas opponents in the early 2000s. Later in 2002, Uruguay defeated Canada, winning 25 to 23. They followed this up with a 10 to nine win over the United States. They again qualified for the World Cup. They won their pool fixture against Georgia 24 to 12.

Uruguay's qualification for the 2007 World Cup started in Americas Round 3a, where they were grouped with Argentina and Chile. After losing their first match 26 points to nil to Argentina, they defeated Chile 43 to 15 in Montevideo, which saw them enter Round 4, where they faced the USA. Uruguay lost on aggregate, and moved onto the repechage round as Americas 4. They played Portugal over two legs — losing the first in Lisbon and winning the second in Montevideo. Portugal qualified on aggregate points.

Uruguay lost the 2011 Rugby World Cup qualification.

Overall record[edit]

Top 25 Rankings as 15 September 2014[1]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  New Zealand 93.75
2 Steady  South Africa 88.24
3 Steady  Australia 88.10
4 Steady  England 85.68
5 Steady  Ireland 83.44
6 Steady  Wales 80.70
7 Steady  France 80.01
8 Steady  Scotland 77.78
9 Steady  Samoa 76.59
10 Steady  Japan 75.39
11 Steady  Fiji 74.56
12 Steady  Argentina 73.98
13 Steady  Tonga 72.58
14 Steady  Italy 70.92
15 Steady  Georgia 70.46
16 Steady  Romania 68.42
17 Steady  Canada 68.01
18 Steady  United States 67.30
19 Steady  Uruguay 63.72
20 Steady  Russia 62.15
21 Steady  Spain 60.65
22 Steady  Namibia 58.78
23 Steady  Portugal 57.73
24 Steady  Hong Kong 57.63
25 Steady  South Korea 57.22
*Change from the previous week
Uruguay's Historical Rankings
Uruguay IRB World Rankings.png
Source: IRB - Graph updated to 20 May 2013[1]

Up until the 4 December 2012, Uruguay has won 81 of their 175 matches played, a win percentage of 46.29%.[2]

Uruguay has lost all official matches versus Argentina, but has a positive record versus their other South American rivals: Chile (25 wins, 13 losses, 1 draw), Paraguay (20 wins, 1 draw) and Brazil (16 wins, 3 losses).

Regarding tier 2 teams, Uruguay has positive records with Portugal and Georgia, neutral records with Spain, and negative records with United States, Canada, Georgia, Romania and Russia.

World Cup Record[edit]

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Finished P W D L F A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Not invited -
United KingdomRepublic of IrelandFrance 1991 Did not enter Did not enter
South Africa 1995 Did not qualify 3 2 0 1 91 28
Wales 1999 Pool Stage 3 1 0 2 42 97 9 6 0 3 209 188
Australia 2003 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 56 255 6 3 0 3 115 144
France 2007 Did not qualify 6 2 0 4 86 140
New Zealand 2011 6 3 1 2 194 107
England 2015 To be determined - - - - - -
Japan 2019 To be determined
Total 2/5 7 2 0 5 98 352 30 16 1 13 695 607











Current squad[edit]

Uruguay's 23-man squad for the 2015 Rugby World Cup Repechage qualification first leg match against Russia on 27 September.[3]

Head Coach: Uruguay Pablo Lemoine

  • Caps updated: 10 September 2014


Note: Flags indicate national union for the club/province as defined by the International Rugby Board.

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Carlos Arboleya Hooker (1985-07-23) 23 July 1985 (age 29) 32 Uruguay Trébol de Paysandú
Nicolás Klappenbach (c) Hooker (1982-03-25) 25 March 1982 (age 32) 36 Uruguay Champagnat
Arturo Ávalo Prop (1986-08-27) 27 August 1986 (age 28) 23 Uruguay Carrasco Polo Club
Alejo Corral Prop (1981-09-11) 11 September 1981 (age 33) 31 Argentina San Isidro Club
Oscar Durán Prop (1982-01-01) 1 January 1982 (age 32) 22 Uruguay Carrasco Polo Club
Franco Lamanna Lock (1991-10-05) 5 October 1991 (age 22) 16 Italy CUS Perugia
Rodrigo Capó Ortega Lock (1980-12-08) 8 December 1980 (age 33) 37 France Castres
Mathias Palomeque Lock 11 Uruguay Trébol de Paysandú
Juan De Freitas Flanker (1989-12-13) 13 December 1989 (age 24) 29 Uruguay Champagnat
Juan Manuel Gaminara Flanker (1989-05-01) 1 May 1989 (age 25) 17 Uruguay Old Boys
Diego Magno Flanker (1989-04-27) 27 April 1989 (age 25) 34 Uruguay Montevideo Cricket Club
Santiago Vilaseca Flanker (1984-09-17) 17 September 1984 (age 30) 18 Uruguay Old Boys
Alejandro Nieto Number 8 (1988-01-07) 7 January 1988 (age 26) 20 Uruguay Champagnat
Alejo Durán Scrum-half (1991-05-20) 20 May 1991 (age 23) 16 Uruguay Trébol de Paysandú
Agustín Ormaechea Scrum-half (1991-03-08) 8 March 1991 (age 23) 14 France Stade Montois
Felipe Berchesi Fly-half (1991-04-12) 12 April 1991 (age 23) 10 France Stade Olympique Chambérien
Rodrigo Silva Fly-half (1992-11-02) 2 November 1992 (age 21) 6 Uruguay Carrasco Polo Club
Joaquín Prada Centre (1991-07-15) 15 July 1991 (age 23) 14 Uruguay Los Cuervos
Alberto Román Centre (1987-06-01) 1 June 1987 (age 27) 24 Uruguay Pucaru Stade Gaulois
Santiago Gilbernau Wing (1988-05-15) 15 May 1988 (age 26) 18 Uruguay Carrasco Polo Club
Leandro Leivas Wing (1988-07-06) 6 July 1988 (age 26) 27 Uruguay Old Christians Club
Jerónimo Etcheverry Fullback (1988-01-11) 11 January 1988 (age 26) 29 Uruguay Carrasco Polo Club
Gastón Mieres Fullback (1989-10-05) 5 October 1989 (age 24) 29 Uruguay Lobos de Punta del Este

Notable All Times Players[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World Rankings". International Rugby Board. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "Statistics for Men's International Rugby Union — Uruguay". Rugbydata.com. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  3. ^ Lista de 23 jugadores con destino a Rusia

External links[edit]