WBCO

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Coordinates: 40°45′51.00″N 82°56′5.00″W / 40.7641667°N 82.9347222°W / 40.7641667; -82.9347222

WBCO
WBCO logo.png
City of license Bucyrus, Ohio
Broadcast area Mid-Ohio
Frequency 1540 kHz
Format Adult Standards/MOR
Power 500 watts day
Class D
Facility ID 7111
Transmitter coordinates 40°45′51.00″N 82°56′5.00″W / 40.7641667°N 82.9347222°W / 40.7641667; -82.9347222
Callsign meaning Bucyrus, Ohio[1]
Affiliations CBS Radio
Agri Broadcast Network
Ohio State IMG Sports Network
Owner Franklin Communications
Website Official website

WBCO (1540 AM) is a radio station licensed to serve the community of Bucyrus, Ohio. The station currently features a format of adult standards provided via satellite by Dial Global (America's Best Music).

History[edit]

WBCO was founded in 1962 by Thomas P. Moore and wife J. LaVonne Moore, along with LaVonne's brother and pioneer in broadcasting, Orville J. Sather, and investors. WBCO was joined by sister-station WBCO-FM (later named WQEL) two years later. The company was first known as Brokensword Broadcasting Co. When the Moores and Sathers bought out the investors, it became Sa-Mor Stations. Full ownership was assumed by Tom and LaVonne following Orville's death. The stations were sold to Mike and Donna Laipply in 1991. In 1996, both stations were sold to the Ohio Radio Group based in Ashland Ohio who also owned stations WQIO and WMVO in Mount Vernon, Ohio, WNCO & WNCO-FM in Ashland, Ohio, WMAN-FM in Fredericktown, Ohio, WFXN in Galion, Ohio and WXXF in Loudonville, Ohio. They would later add local WYNT in Upper Sandusky, Ohio to the group making it the largest radio ownership company in Ohio. In 2001, Ohio Radio Group was purchased by Clear Channel Communications which had to sell two stations that included WBCO and WQEL who was purchased by Scantland Broadcasting, then current Saga Communications. The stations are now managed by Debbi Gifford, who was trained by and maintains a relationship with Tom and LaVonne.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Call Letter Origins". Radio History on the Web. 

External links[edit]