Zenos Frudakis

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Zenos Frudakis
Zenos Frudakis Frank Rizzo.jpg
Frudakis, posed with his statue of former Philadelphia mayor Frank Rizzo
Born 1951 (age 62–63)
San Francisco, California, United States
Nationality American
Education Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts
Known for Sculpture
Notable work(s) United States Air Force Memorial Honor Guard

Zenos Frudakis (born 1951) is a figurative sculptor whose subjects include portraits of living and historical individuals and poetic/philosophical sculpture. He lives and works near Philadelphia. His works include those at Brookgreen Gardens,[1] the Lotos Club of New York City,[2] the Utsukushi ga-hara Open Air Museum in Japan,[3] the National Academy of Design,[4] and the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, South Africa[5]

Biography[edit]

Freedom, 2001. GlaxoSmithKline World Headquarters, Philadelphia. 20 feet long, 8 feet high

Zenos father, born in Greece, came to the U.S. as a boy. The oldest of five children growing up in Greek culture, Zenos admired, respected, and was drawn to Greek sculpture. Greek art influenced his aesthetic vision; additional inspiration came from sculptors Michaelangelo, Bernini, Carpeaux and Rodin. The poetry of Eliot, Frost, Roethke and Graves, is important to Zenos, as is post-modern, deconstructionist philosophy.

Born in 1951 in San Francisco to Greek musician and poet Vasilis Frudakis and Kassiani Alexis, Frudakis was raised in Wheeling, West Virginia, and Gary, Indiana, where he worked in the steel mills. He began sculpting at a very young age, and in 1972 came to Philadelphia to study at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He studied sculpture with two Prix de Rome winners: his elder brother, sculptor Evangelos Frudakis, and painter James Hanes. At the University of Pennsylvania, he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Fine Art.[6]

Works[edit]

Arnold Palmer

In a career spanning over three decades, Frudakis has produced monumental figures such as the United States Air Force Memorial Honor Guard[7] and Freedom, created in 2001 for the GlaxoSmithKline headquarters in Philadelphia.[8]

His works include:

  • Frank Rizzo, former mayor of Philadelphia. Bronze, over-life-size sculpture, 10 feet (3.0 m) high. Municipal Services Building Plaza (across from City Hall), Philadelphia, PA.[9]
  • Mark Twain. Bronze, over-life-size sculpture. The Lotos Club, New York, NY.[2]
  • Reaching. Bronze, 2 figures each 7 feet (2.1 m) high. Capitol Plaza, Indianapolis, IN.[10]
  • Payne Stewart. Bronze, over-life-size sculpture. Pinehurst Resort, Pinehurst, NC.[11]
  • Joseph J. Ruvane, former CEO of GlaxoSmithKline. Bronze, over-life-size sculpture. Research Triangle Park, NC.[12]
  • Irish Wolfhound. Bronze, over-life-size sculpture. Brookgreen Gardens, SC.[13]

He has exhibited at Fleisher Museum, Scottsdale, AZ, Masterworks of American Sculpture, 1999[14]

Awards[edit]

Frudakis was the youngest sculptor ever nominated for membership in the prestigious National Sculpture Society.[15]

In 1990, Frudakis was invited to participate in Japan’s Third Rodin Grand Prize Exhibition, where he won the Hakone Award at Utsukushi-ga-hara Open Air Museum.[16] The Museum purchased a cast of Frudakis’s sculpture Reaching.[17]

In 1991 he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member, and became a full Academician in 1993.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robin R. Salmon, Brookgreen Gardens Sculpture (Brookgreen Gardens, 1993), v. 2, pp. 188-91.
  2. ^ a b The Lotos Experience, The Tradition Continues (Lotos Club, 1995), pp. 34-35.
  3. ^ Third Rodin Grand Prize Exhibit, The Utsukushi-ga-hara Open Air Museum, Hakone Open Air Museum, Embassies of Greece, Spain, United Kingdom and British Consul, United States, West Germany, 1990, pp. 27-28.
  4. ^ When an artist is voted into membership in the National Academy the Academy accepts a work of art from that artist; Frudakis's work was Sheila, a life-size bronze bust.
  5. ^ Gene Freedman, "The Unveiling of a Memorial," USIA World, April 1989, pp. 10-11. See also "Hope and Glory," Philadelphia Inquirer, Sunday March 12, 1989, cover and pp. 4H-5H; "Martin Luther King Jr Is Remembered," Herald International Tribune, January 17, 1989, front page; and "Bust of Dr. King," Washington Post, January 17, 1989, p. 1.
  6. ^ Sarah Blackman, "Sculpting a Life" (feature article on Frudakis), The Pennsylvania Gazette, Class of '82, November/December 2002, p. 3.
  7. ^ a b Col. Walter Boyne, Soaring to Glory, The United States Air Force Memorial (for the Air Force Memorial Foundation by the Donning Company, 2007), Chapter 7, "A Perfect Partnership," pp. 80-93. See also "Guard Honored," The Academy Spirit, United States Air Force Academy, Colorado, v. 47, no. 40 (October 5, 2007), p. 1.
  8. ^ Art Business News, September 2001, front page photograph.
  9. ^ "Mayoral Monument Emerges," Philadelphia Inquirer, Sunday September 27, 1998, front page. See also Cherie Kemper-Starner, "Rizzo Comes to Life in Bronze," Philadelphia Inquirer (City & Region), December 2, 1997, pp. B1 and B6; and Murray Dubin, "Frank Rizzo, Still Larger Than Life," Philadelphia Inquirer (New Jersey & Region), December 27, 1998, pp. B1 and B4.
  10. ^ Jean Henry, "Contemporary Figurative Sculpture," The National Sculpture Society Celebrates the Figure (National Sculpture Society, 1987), pp. 52-53.
  11. ^ Lee Pace, The Spirit of Pinehurst (Pinehurst Resort, 2007), pp. 86-87. See also World Golf Courses (Chartwell Books, 2007), pp. 144-45.
  12. ^ Grace Glueck, "Capturing C.E.O.'s for Posterity," New York Times Magazine, December 3, 1989; and Carolyn Torcellini, "Lest They Forget," Forbes, June 26, 1989.
  13. ^ Robin Salmon, Brookgreen Gardens Sculpture (Brookgreen Gardens, 1993), v. 2, pp. 188-91.
  14. ^ Fleisher Museum. Masterworks of American Sculpture, 1999.
  15. ^ National Sculpture Society. "Fellows of NSS". Retrieved 2012-03-30. 
  16. ^ Third Rodin Grand Prize Exhibit, The Utsukushi-ga-hara Open Air Museum, Hakone Open Air Museum, Embassies of Greece, Spain, United Kingdom and British Consul, United States, West Germany, 1990, pp. 27-28.
  17. ^ Donald Reynolds, Masters of American Sculpture (Abbeville Press, 1993), p. 250.
  18. ^ Citizens Bank Park. "Citizens Bank Park". Retrieved 2012-03-30. 
  19. ^ Carchidi, Sam (2004), "Four legends honored with statues", The Philadelphia Inquirer (April 13): F8 

Further reading[edit]

  • Appelbaum, David, and Mel Thompson, editors. World Philosophy. Vega, 2002, pp. 250–51.
  • Boyne, Walter J., Rosalie Frudakis, Katherine Jaeger, et al. The United States Air Force Memorial Honor Guard, A Sculpture by Zenos Frudakis. Techni Press, 2007.
  • Dunhoff, Richard, and Philip H. Wagner. Philadelphia, A Photographic Portrait. Twin Lights Publishers, 2004, p. 14.
  • Goode, James M. Washington Sculpture. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.
  • Gordon, Robert, and Tom Burgoyne. Movin' On Up. MidAtlantic Press, 2004, pp. 264–64.

External links[edit]