Glassboro, New Jersey

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Glassboro, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Glassboro
Glassboro highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Glassboro highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Glassboro, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Glassboro, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°42′00″N 75°06′41″W / 39.700096°N 75.111423°W / 39.700096; -75.111423Coordinates: 39°42′00″N 75°06′41″W / 39.700096°N 75.111423°W / 39.700096; -75.111423[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Gloucester
Incorporated March 11, 1878
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Leo J. McCabe (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Joseph A. Brigandi, Jr.[4]
 • Clerk Patricia A. Frontino[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 9.221 sq mi (23.882 km2)
 • Land 9.184 sq mi (23.787 km2)
 • Water 0.037 sq mi (0.095 km2)  0.40%
Area rank 217th of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 148 ft (45 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 18,579
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 18,953
 • Rank 137th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county[12]
 • Density 2,022.9/sq mi (781.0/km2)
 • Density rank 291st of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08028[13][14]
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401526340[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885231[1][17]
Website http://www.glassboroonline.com

Glassboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 18,579,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 489 (-2.6%) from the 19,068 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,454 (+22.1%) from the 15,614 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

What is now Glassboro was originally formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 11, 1878, from portions of Clayton Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Elk Township (April 17, 1891) and Pitman (May 24, 1905). Glassboro was incorporated as a borough on March 18, 1920, replacing Glassboro Township.[19]

Glassboro is home to Rowan University, founded in 1923 and formerly known as Glassboro State College, which was the site of the Glassboro Summit Conference in 1967 between U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin.[20]

Geography[edit]

Glassboro is located at 39°42′00″N 75°06′41″W / 39.700096°N 75.111423°W / 39.700096; -75.111423 (39.700096,-75.111423). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 9.221 square miles (23.882 km2), of which, 9.184 square miles (23.787 km2) of it was land and 0.037 square miles (0.095 km2) of it (0.40%) was water.[1][2]

Glassboro borders Elk Township, Clayton Borough, Monroe Township, Washington Township, Pitman Borough, Mantua Township, and Harrison Township.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Glassboro has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 2,088
1890 2,642 26.5%
1900 2,677 * 1.3%
1910 2,821 * 5.4%
1920 3,073 8.9%
1930 4,799 56.2%
1940 4,925 2.6%
1950 5,867 19.1%
1960 10,253 74.8%
1970 12,938 26.2%
1980 14,574 12.6%
1990 15,614 7.1%
2000 19,068 22.1%
2010 18,579 −2.6%
Est. 2013 18,953 [11] 2.0%
Population sources: 1880-2000[22]
1880-1920[23] 1880-1890[24]
1890-1910[25] 1910-1930[26]
1930-1990[27] 2000[28][29] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 18,579 people, 6,158 households, and 3,972 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,022.9 per square mile (781.0/km2). There were 6,590 housing units at an average density of 717.5 per square mile (277.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 72.25% (13,423) White, 18.67% (3,469) Black or African American, 0.11% (21) Native American, 2.87% (534) Asian, 0.05% (10) Pacific Islander, 3.12% (580) from other races, and 2.92% (542) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.42% (1,378) of the population.[8]

There were 6,158 households, of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 22.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.13.[8]

In the borough, 19.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 26.4% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28.4 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $54,795 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,793) and the median family income was $67,171 (+/- $9,496). Males had a median income of $49,695 (+/- $4,361) versus $43,489 (+/- $2,608) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,108 (+/- $1,421). About 9.3% of families and 14.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.6% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 19,068 people, 6,225 households, and 4,046 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,071.3 people per square mile (799.4/km²). There were 6,555 housing units at an average density of 712.0 per square mile (274.8/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 74.5% White, 19.5% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.5% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.8% of the population.[28][29]

There were 6,225 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.17.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.1% under the age of 18, 25.6% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 16.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,992, and the median income for a family was $55,246. Males had a median income of $40,139 versus $30,358 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,113. About 8.5% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Glassboro is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Glassboro, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[31][32]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Glassboro is Leo J. McCabe, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014.[33] Members of the Borough Council are Council President Tony Fiola (2015), Hector Cabezas (2014), George Cossabone (2016), Joe D'Alessandro (2014), Edward A. Malandro (2016), Anna Miller (appointed in March 2013 to fill the vacant seat of George Cossabone[34][35]).[36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Glassboro is located in the 1st Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[9][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Glassboro had been in the 4th state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2014, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; term ends December 31, 2015),[49] Deputy Freeholder Director Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 2015),[50] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2014),[51] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2016),[52] Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2016),[53] Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2014)[54] and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township; 2014).[55][56][57][58] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk James N. Hogan,[59] Surrogate Helene M. Reed (Monroe Township)[60] and Sheriff Carmel Morina (Greenwich Township).[61][62][57]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 9,772 registered voters in Glassboro, of which 3,733 (38.2%) were registered as Democrats, 1,408 (14.4%) were registered as Republicans and 4,617 (47.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties.[63]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.8% of the vote here (4,516 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 35.4% (2,547 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (62 votes), among the 7,195 ballots cast by the borough's 10,312 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.8%.[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 58.5% of the vote here (3,930 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 40.1% (2,699 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (60 votes), among the 6,723 ballots cast by the borough's 9,801 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.6.[65]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 51.7% of the vote here (2,198 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 39.0% (1,659 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.7% (287 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (29 votes), among the 4,255 ballots cast by the borough's 9,958 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout.[66]

Education[edit]

The Glassboro Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 1,730 students and 179.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.66:1.[67] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[68]) are Genesis Pre-School Program, J. Harvey Rodgers School[69] (354 students; grades PreK and kindergarten), Dorothy L. Bullock School[70] (361; 1-3), Thomas E. Bowe Elementary School[71] (335; 4-6), Glassboro Intermediate School[72] (NA; 7-8) and Glassboro High School[73] (498; 9-12).[74]

History[edit]

Glassboro's early history was built on the manufacturing of glass—the town was first established in 1779 by Solomon Stanger as "Glass Works in the Woods"; glass manufacturers over the years since include Heston-Carpenter Glass Works, Olive Glass Works, Harmony Glass Works, Temperanceville Glass Works, Whitney Brothers Glass Works, Owens Bottle Company, Owens Illinois Glass Company, and Anchor Hocking.[75]

The Glassboro Summit Conference between U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin took place in Glassboro. Johnson and Kosygin met for three days from June 23 to June 25, 1967, at Glassboro State College (later renamed Rowan University). The location was chosen as a compromise. Kosygin, having agreed to address the United Nations in New York City, wanted to meet in New York. Johnson, wary of encountering protests against the Vietnam War, preferred to meet in Washington, D.C. They agreed on Glassboro because it was equidistant between the two cities.[76] The generally amicable atmosphere of the summit was referred to as the "Spirit of Glassboro," although the leaders failed to reach agreement on limiting anti-ballistic missile systems.

On June 19, 1986, Ronald Reagan became the first sitting president to speak at a high school graduation when he spoke at the Glassboro High School commencement ceremonies.[77]

Wineries[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 78.43 miles (126.22 km) of roadways, of which 57.61 miles (92.71 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.29 miles (21.39 km) by Gloucester County and 7.53 miles (12.12 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[78]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service to and from Philadelphia on the 313, 408 and 412 routes.[79][80]

Passenger train service to Glassboro existed from 1860 to 1971. The station used by the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines is being renovated as visitors center.[81][82][83] The station is a planned terminal on the Glassboro–Camden Line, an 18-mile (28.97 km) diesel multiple unit (DMU) light rail system projected for completion in 2019.[84][85]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Glassboro include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Glassboro. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk/Registrar of Vital Statistics, Borough of Glassboro. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Glassboro, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Glassboro borough, Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Glassboro borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 29, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Glassboro, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 12, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
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  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
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External links[edit]