48th Primetime Emmy Awards

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48th Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 8, 1996 (Ceremony)
  • September 7, 1996 (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Hosted by Michael J. Fox
Paul Reiser
Oprah Winfrey
Television/Radio coverage
Network ABC
Produced by Al Schwartz[1]
Directed by Louis J. Horvitz[1]

The 48th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were held at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California, USA. The awards were presented over two ceremonies, one untelevised on September 7, 1996 and other televised on September 8, 1996. It was hosted by Michael J. Fox, Paul Reiser, and Oprah Winfrey. Two networks, A&E and AMC, received their first major nominations this year.

Frasier took home Outstanding Comedy Series for the third straight year, and won two major awards overall. In the drama field, ER came into the ceremony as the most nominated drama for the second straight year with eleven major nominations, it defeated defending champion NYPD Blue to win Outstanding Drama Series. This turned out to be the only major award ER won. No show won more than two major awards.

The HBO comedy The Larry Sanders Show made Emmy history when it became the first show outside of the Big Three television networks to receive the most major nominations (12).

For the twelfth and final season of Murder, She Wrote, Angela Lansbury was once again nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, she had been nominated for every season of the show, but she was defeated once again. In the process she set records for being the most nominated actress in the category (18), as well as the most nominated actress without winning. Both of these records still stand.

Winners and nominees[edit]

[2]

Programs[edit]

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting[edit]

Lead performances[edit]

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances[edit]

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Elaine Benes on Seinfeld (Episodes: "The Soup Nazi" + "The Wait Out"), (NBC)
    • Christine Baranski as Maryann Thorpe on Cybill (Episodes: "A Who's Who for What's His Name" + "Wedding Bell Blues"), (CBS)
    • Janeane Garofalo as Paula on The Larry Sanders Show (Episodes: "Conflict of Interest" + "I Was a Teenage Lesbian"), (HBO)
    • Jayne Meadows as Alice Morgan-DuPont-Sutting-Cushing-Ferruke on High Society (Episodes: "Family Val's" + "Alice Doesn't Pump Here Anymore"), (CBS)
    • Renée Taylor as Sylvia Fine on The Nanny (Episodes: "Where's the Pearls?" + "The Cantor Show"), (CBS)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
  • Ray Walston as Henry Bone on Picket Fences (Episodes: "Witness for the Prosecution" + "My Romance"), (CBS)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Guest performances[edit]

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing[edit]

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Miniseries or a Special
  • Louis J. Horvitz for The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, (CBS)
    • Ellen Brown for The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, (NBC)
    • Jerry Foley for Late Show with David Letterman, (CBS)
    • Michael Lindsay-Hogg for Marsalis on Music (Episode: "Sousa to Satchmo"), (PBS)
    • Jeff Margolis for The 68th Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)

Writing[edit]

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Miniseries or a Special

Most major nominations[edit]

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 45
  • HBO – 35
  • CBS – 27
  • ABC – 19
By program
  • The Larry Sanders Show (HBO) – 12
  • ER (NBC) – 11
  • Chicago Hope (CBS) / NYPD Blue (ABC) / Seinfeld (NBC) – 8
  • Frasier (NBC) – 7

Most major awards[edit]

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 10
  • CBS / HBO – 6
  • ABC / Fox / TNT – 2
By program
  • Dennis Miller Live (HBO) / Frasier (NBC) / Gulliver's Travels (NBC) / The Kennedy Center Honors (CBS)
    Picket Fences (CBS) / Rasputin: Dark Servant of Destiny (HBO) / The X-Files (Fox) – 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

In Memoriam[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]