53rd Primetime Emmy Awards

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53rd Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
Location Shubert Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Hosted by Ellen DeGeneres
Television/Radio coverage
Network CBS

The 53rd Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, November 4, 2001, seven weeks late. The ceremony was re-scheduled twice from its original date of September 16 at the Shrine Auditorium because of the September 11, 2001 attacks that occurred five days prior to the event. It was also removed from its rescheduled date of October 7 again at the same venue as a result of the start of the War in Afghanistan. The event was then relocated to the Shubert Theater. The Shubert had previously hosted the 1973 and 1976 ceremonies and was slated for demolition in 2002. The ceremony was hosted by Ellen DeGeneres and was broadcast on CBS.

Barbra Streisand sang "You'll Never Walk Alone" in a surprise appearance at the close, in honor of the victims of the attacks.[1]

Sex and the City became the first premium channel to win Outstanding Comedy Series, this was its only major award. The NBC cult hit Freaks and Geeks accomplished a rare feat, though it only ran for one season, it was nominated two different years for writing. The episode "Bowling" made Malcolm in the Middle just the second show, and first comedy, to have two different episodes win awards for directing and writing. The Defenders was the first show to do this in 1963 and 1965. (Specific episodes were not nominated in the comedy categories until the late 1960s).

In the drama field, The West Wing won Outstanding Drama Series for its second straight year, and led all shows with four major awards on the night. The Sopranos led all shows with 15 major nominations, and was second to The West Wing with three major wins.

Mike Nichols's win made him the ninth person to become an EGOT.

Winners and nominees[edit]

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold:[2]

Eric McCormack, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Patricia Heaton, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
James Gandolfini, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner
Edie Falco, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Kenneth Branagh, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Judy Davis, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Peter MacNicol, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Doris Roberts, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Bradley Whitford, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Allison Janney, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Brian Cox, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner

Programs[edit]

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting[edit]

Lead performances[edit]

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Supporting performances[edit]

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Guest performances[edit]

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Jean Smart as Lana Gardner on Frasier, (NBC)
    • Jami Gertz as Kimmy Bishop on Ally McBeal (Episode: "Tis the Season"), (Fox)
    • Cloris Leachman as Grandma Ida on Malcolm in the Middle (Episode: "Grandparents"), (Fox)
    • Bernadette Peters as Cassandra Lewis on Ally McBeal (Episode: "The Getaway"), (Fox)
    • Susan Sarandon as Cecilia Monroe on Friends (Episode: "The One with Joey's New Brain"), (NBC)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
  • Michael Emerson as William Hinks on The Practice (Episode: "An Early Frost"), (ABC)
    • René Auberjonois as Judge Mantz on The Practice (Episode: "We Hold These Truths"), (ABC)
    • James Cromwell as Bishop Lionel Stewart on ER (Episode: "A Walk in the Woods"), (NBC)
    • Patrick Dempsey as Aaron Brooks on Once and Again (Episode: "Strangers and Brothers"), (ABC)
    • Oliver Platt as Oliver Babish on The West Wing (Episode: "The Fall's Gonna Kill You"), (NBC)

Directing[edit]

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries or Movie

Writing[edit]

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or Movie
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, (Comedy Central)

Most major nominations[edit]

By network [note 1]
  • HBO – 44
  • NBC – 43
  • ABC – 24
  • CBS – 15
  • Fox – 13
By program
  • The Sopranos (HBO) – 15
  • The West Wing (NBC) – 12
  • Malcolm in the Middle (Fox) – 8
  • Will & Grace (NBC) – 7
  • Anne Frank: The Whole Story (ABC) / Conspiracy (HBO) / Frasier (NBC) / Life with Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows (ABC) – 6

Most major awards[edit]

By network [note 1]
  • HBO – 8
  • NBC – 8
  • ABC – 4
  • CBS – 3
  • Fox – 3
  • Bravo – 2
By program
  • The West Wing (NBC) – 4
  • The Sopranos (HBO) – 3
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

In Memoriam[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Streisand's stage fright spiked with thought of terror, By Edna Gundersen, USA TODAY, 12-12-2001
  2. ^ "2001 Primetime Emmy Awards". IMDb. Retrieved April 19, 2013. 

External links[edit]