Avoyel

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The Avoyel or Avoyelles was a small Natchez-speaking tribe who inhabited land near the mouth of the Red River at its confluence with the Atchafalaya River. Present-day Marksville, Louisiana, developed at this site. The indigenous name for this tribe is Tamoucougoula. The word Avoyel is of French derivation and means either "Flint People" or "the people of the rocks." [1]

History[edit]

The Avoyel were neighbors of the Tunica people.[2] French colonists named Avoyelles Parish for the local tribe.[3] The traditional homeland for the Avoyel was near the mouth of the Red River at the Atchafalaya River. It includes extensive lakes and bayous in a large wetlands area.[4]

Numbering 280 in 1698, as recorded by the French, the tribe declined markedly after that. They were likely affected by the same drastic decimation as were other tribes, primarily due to new infectious diseases unwittingly carried by Europeans, to which the natives had no acquired immunity. By 1805 the Avoyel were said to number only two or three women. The Avoyel survivors were believed to have been absorbed by marriage into the neighboring Tunica people.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Quoting Gremillion & Gremillion (1982). "Extended History, Avoyelles Parish". My Louisiana Genealogy. Archived from the original on 2010-04-09. Retrieved 2010-04-11. 
  2. ^ Quoting Gremillion & Gremillion (1982). "Extended History, Avoyelles Parish". My Louisiana Genealogy. Archived from the original on 2010-04-09. Retrieved 2010-04-11. 
  3. ^ Janice Rice (2007). "Avoyelles Parish". Genealogy Trails. Retrieved 2010-04-11. 
  4. ^ Janice Rice (2007). "Avoyelles Parish". Genealogy Trails. Retrieved 2010-04-11.