Barringer Trophy

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The Lewin B. Barringer Memorial Trophy
Awarded for The greatest straight-line distance soaring flight during the previous calendar year, other than the U.S. National Championships.
Country USA
Presented by Soaring Society of America (SSA)
First awarded 1948
Last awarded 2010
Official website Official site

The Lewin B. Barringer Memorial Trophy was established by the will of Lewin Barringer in 1948. The original rules specified that the trophy would be awarded for the longest distance soaring flight from any type of launching method other than airplane tow. The trophy would become the permanent property of any pilot who won it three times in succession.[1]

History[edit]

Paul Bikle was the first pilot to win the Trophy three times in succession. He subsequently donated the trophy back to the Soaring Society of America as a perpetual trophy. In 1957 the SSA Directors, with Bikle's approval, changed the rules to allow for any type of launch method and include any flights, other than those flown at the US National Contest.[2]

Recipients[edit]

Recipients of this trophy, from 1948 to present, include:[3]

Year Recipient Qualifying flight
1948 Donald Pollard 206 miles (332 km) from Elmira, NY to Asbury Park, NJ in an Arsenal Air 100[4]
1951 William Beuby 141.5 miles (227.7 km) on July 4, 1951, likely in a Schweizer TG-2.[5]
1952 Paul Bikle 217 miles (349 km) from El Mirage, CA to Yuma, AZ in his Schweizer 1-23[6][7][8]
1953 Paul Bikle 202 miles (325 km) in his Schweizer 1-23[8][9]
1954 Paul Bikle 249 miles (401 km) in his Schweizer 1-23[8][9]
1955 Paul Bikle 280 miles (450 km) in his Schweizer 1-23[8][9]
1956 Paul Bikle 210 miles (340 km) in his Schweizer 1-23[8][9]
1957 Sterling Starr 333 miles (536 km) on May 19, 1957 from Bishop, CA to Escalante, UT in a Schweizer 1-23. This flight completed Starr's Diamond badge[10]
1958 Julien Audette 236 miles (380 km)on July 27, 1958 from Regina, Saskatchewan to Minot, ND in a Schweizer 1-26. Audette is the only winner to start their flight outside of the US.[11]
1959 Harland Ross 365.5 miles (588.2 km) from Kent, TX to Farley, NM in his Ross R-6. The flight earned Ross his Diamond Distance and completed his Diamond badge, No. 14 in the US.[12]
1960 Joseph Lincoln 455.5 miles (733.1 km) from Prescott, Arizona to Variadero, New Mexico in his Schweizer 1-23[13][14]
1961 John Ryan 454 miles (731 km) from Kingman, Arizona to Santa Fe, New Mexico in his Sisu 1A[15][16]
1962 Harald Jensen 435 miles (700 km) from Naperville, Illinois to Nashville, Tennessee in a Vogt Lo-150[17][18]
1963 Alvin Parker 487 miles (784 km) from Odessa, Texas to Great Bend, Kansas for the Distance to a Goal World Record in his Sisu 1A[19]
1964 Alvin Parker 647 miles (1,041 km) from Odessa, Texas to Kimball, Nebraska on July 31, 1964 in his Sisu 1A. This was the first glider flight in the world to exceed 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) and set the World Record for Free Distance[20][21]
1965 Alvin Parker 371 miles (597 km)from Odessa, Texas to Elkhart, Kansas in his Sisu 1A.[9][22]
1966 Michael Berger 387.2 miles (623.1 km) on May 22, 1966 from Westcliff, Colorado to Mankato, Kansas in a Schleicher Ka 6. The flight started with a climb in wave to 31,000 feet and ended at Mankato because Berger only had maps that went to that point. This was only his second cross country flight and earned him Gold Distance (finishing his Gold badge), Diamond Distance, and Diamond Altitude.[23][24]
1967 Wallace Scott 552 miles (888 km) from Odessa, Texas to Casa Grande, Arizona in his Schleicher Ka 6E. Scott had declared Gila Bend, Arizona as a goal which would've been a World Record but was stopped by storms along the route.[25]
1968 Wallace Scott 492.2 miles (792.1 km) from Odessa, Texas to near Ulysses, Kansas on August 5, 1968 in his Sisu 1A[26]
1969 Wallace Scott 606 miles (975 km) from Odessa, Texas to Gila Bend, Arizona on August 22, 1969 in his Schleicher ASW 12. This flight earned Scott the World Record for Distance to a Goal.[27]
1970 Ben Greene and Wallace Scott 717 miles (1,154 km) from Odessa, Texas to Columbus, Nebraska on July 26, 1970. Both Scott and Greene flew Schleicher ASW 12's. With this flight they jointly set a new World Record for Free Distance.[28]
1971 Wallace Scott 585 miles (941 km) from Odessa, Texas to Estrella, Arizona on September 11, 1971 in his Schleicher ASW 12.[29]
1972 Wallace Scott II 635 miles (1,022 km) from Odessa, Texas to Lexington, Nebraska in his Schleicher ASW 12.[30]
1973 Wallace Scott II 639 miles (1,028 km) from Odessa, Texas to Kearney, Nebraska on August 27, 1973 in his Schleicher ASW 12.[31]
1974 Jerome Trowbridge 476 miles (766 km) from Boca Raton, Florida to Montezuma, Georgia on April 8, 1974 in his Schempp-Hirth Standard Cirrus.[32]
1975 Wallace Scott 600.9 miles (967.1 km) from Odessa, Texas to Imperial, Nebraska in his Schleicher ASW 12[33]
1976 Wallace Scott 540.16 miles (869.30 km) from Odessa, Texas in his Grob Astir CS.[34]
1977 Wallace Scott 716 miles (1,152 km) from Odessa, Texas to Primrose, Nebraska in his Schweizer 1-35. The flight set a US National Record for Free Distance in the 15 Meter Class.[35][36]
1978 Wallace Scott 629 miles (1,012 km) from Odessa, Texas to Grant, Nebraska[37]
1979 Wallace Scott 590 miles (950 km) from Odessa, Texas to McCook, Nebraska in a Slingsby Vega[38]
1980 Wallace Scott 675 miles (1,086 km)[9]
1981 Marion Griffith Jr. 645 miles (1,038 km) from Refugio, Texas to Liberal, Kansas in a Glasflugel 604. This flight also set a US distance to a goal record.[39]
1982 Bill Seed Jr and Wallace Scott 533 miles (858 km) from Brownsville, Texas to Bowie, Texas. Scott flew his Schleicher ASW 20 and Seed flew a Schleicher ASW 17B on the flight which ended in a simultaneous landing[40][41]
1983 Wallace Scott 668.36 miles (1,075.62 km) from Odessa, Texas to Dalton, Nebraska on August 17.[42]
1984 Michael Koerner 903 miles (1,453 km) from California City, California to Seminole, Texas in his Slingsby Kestrel 19. As of October 2011, this flight still stands as a US National Record for Free Distance in the Open Class Singleplace Category.[43][44]
1985 Michael Koerner 449.9 miles (724.0 km) from California City, California to Wells, Nevada on May 25, 1985.[45]
1986 Wallace Scott 526.6 miles (847.5 km) from Uvalde, Texas to Perryton, Texas on August 13, 1986.[46]
1987 Wallace Scott 569.03 miles (915.77 km) from Uvalde, Texas to Medicine Lodge, Kansas in his Schleicher ASW 20 on August 25, 1987.[47]
1988 Wallace Scott 716.74 miles (1,153.48 km) from Odessa, Texas to Hyannis, Nebraska on July 5, 1988.[48]
1989 Wallace Scott 649.16 miles (1,044.72 km) from Odessa, Texas to Great Bend, Kansas in his Schleicher ASW 20 on July 29, 1989.[49]
1990 Wallace Scott 725.59 miles (1,167.72 km) from Odessa, Texas to Thedford, Nebraska in his Schleicher ASW 20 on July 7, 1990.[50]
1991 Ira Phillips 541.82 miles (871.97 km) from Gadsden, Alabama to Keyser, West Virginia in his Schleicher ASW 20 on October 6, 1991.[51]
1992 Mark Keene 333.90 miles (537.36 km)from Refugio, Texas to Nevada, Texas in his Schweizer 1-26.[52]
1993 Wallace Scott 539.87 miles (868.84 km) from Odessa, Texas to Goodland, Kansas on September 21, 1993 in his Schleicher ASW 20.[53]
1994 Hank Marlowe 669.94 miles (1,078.16 km) from Llano, California to Weiser, Idaho on July 9, 1994 in his Glaser-Dirks DG-600.[54]
1995 Michael Koerner 554.74 miles (892.77 km) from Llano, California to Lakeview, Arizona.[55]
1996 Hank Marlowe and John O'Connell Graybill 544 miles (875 km) from Llano, California to McDermitt, Oregon. They flew on the same day but never saw each on other during the flight.[56]
1997 Karl Striedieck 805 miles (1,296 km) from Eagle Field, Pennsylvania to Selma, Alabama on April 18, 1997. As of January 2012, this flight still hold US National Records for Free Distance in the 15-meter class and Distance to a Goal in Open and 15 Meter class[57]
1998 Hank Marlowe 431 miles (694 km) from Llano, California to Battle Mountain, Nevada in his Schleicher ASW 27 on August 8, 1998[58]
1999 Michael Koerner 543.91 miles (875.34 km) in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus[59]
2000 Robert Maronde, Phillippe Athuil, and John O'Connell Graybill 496.68 miles (799.33 km) from Llano, California to Mount Pleasant, Utah. Maronde flew his Schleicher ASW 27, Athuil his Rolladen-Schneider LS6, and Graybill his Schempp-Hirth Ventus.[60]
2001 Michael Koerner 549.95 miles (885.06 km) from Llano, California to Heber City, Utah in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus on May 26, 2001.[61]
2002 Michael Koerner 553.95 miles (891.50 km) from Llano, California to Lakeview, Oregon in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus on May 24, 2002.[62]
2003 Phillippe Athuil 645.6 miles (1,039.0 km) from Llano, California to Aberdeen, Idaho.[63]
2004 Gordon Boettger 698.8 miles (1,124.6 km) from Minden, Nevada to Steamboat Springs, Colorado in his Glasflugel Kestrel 17.[64][65]
2005 Michael Koerner 602.3 miles (969.3 km) from Llano, California to Burley, Idaho on July 18, 2005 in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus.[66]
2006 Michael Koerner 592.53 miles (953.58 km) from Llano, California to Paisley, Oregon on July 8, 2006 in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus.[67]
2007 Jim Ketcham 694.85 miles (1,118.25 km) from Agua Dulce, California to Bend, Oregon in his Schleicher ASH 26E.[68]
2008 Henry Retting 527.3 miles (848.6 km) from Boca Raton, FL to Griffin, GA in his Schempp-Hirth Discus.[69]
2009 Phillippe Athuil 593.3 miles (954.8 km) from Llano, California to Paisley, Idaho in his Schleicher ASH 25 on August 1, 2009.[70]
2010 Michael Koerner 565 miles (909 km) from Llano, California to Rome State, Oregon in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus.[71]
2011 Gary Osoba 565 miles (909 km) from Zapata, TX to Amarillo, TX in his Marsden Gemini on July 2, 2011.[72][73]
2012 Kevin Wayt 604.24 miles (972.43 km) from Tehachapi, CA to Burns, OR in his Schempp-Hirth Ventus on September 8, 2012. This flight also won Kevin the annual Dust Devil Dash free distance soaring competition.[74][75]
2013 Gordon Boettger and Hugh Bennett 701.46 miles (1,128.89 km) from Minden, NV to Gunnison, CO in their Schempp-Hirth Duo Discus on April 14, 2013. This flight also set the US Multiplace Free Distance Record.[76][77]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Barringer Trophy". Soaring. 12 (3-4): 17. March–April 1948. 
  2. ^ "Barringer Trophy Summary". SSA. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 12 July 2011. 
  3. ^ "Barringer Trophy Winners". SSA. 
  4. ^ Pollard, Don (March–April 1948). "The Air-100". Soaring. 12 (3-4): 2. 
  5. ^ Burr, Howard (July–August 1951). "The 18th National". Soaring. 15 (4): 3, 5. 
  6. ^ "Trophies at 19th". Soaring: 19. September–October 1952. 
  7. ^ Briegleb, William (May–June 1952). "El Mirage Field". Soaring. 16 (3): 33. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Licher, Lloyd (September–October 1958). "25th Annual U.S. Soaring Competitions". Soaring. 22 (5): 18. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Liebacher, John. "Unofficial Barringer Trophy Listing". Archived from the original on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
  10. ^ Starr, Sterling (July–August 1957). "Diamonds in the Sky". Soaring. 21 (4): 12–13. 
  11. ^ Licher, Lloyd (September 1958). "26th Annual US National Soaring Competition". Soaring. 23 (5): 11. 
  12. ^ Ross, Harland (October 1960). "Cross-Country on the "Marfa Dew Point Front"". Soaring. 24 (10): 4–7, 11. 
  13. ^ Navoy, Helen (September 1961). "28th Annual U.S. National Soaring Championships". Soaring. 25 (9): 11. 
  14. ^ Lincoln, Joseph (November 1960). "Flight to Variadero". Soaring. 24 (11): 4–6. 
  15. ^ Barnes Jr., Wilson (September 1962). "29th Annual U.S. National Soaring Championships". Soaring. 26 (9): 12. 
  16. ^ "Long Soaring Flights". Soaring. 25 (6): 1. June 1961. 
  17. ^ Delp, Nikki (June 1962). "School News". Soaring. 26 (6): 19. 
  18. ^ Licher, Lloyd (August 1963). "30th Annual U.S. National Soaring Championships". Soaring. 27 (8): 14. 
  19. ^ "31st Annual U.S. National Soaring Championships". Soaring. 28 (8): 2, 12. August 1964. 
  20. ^ Page, Tom (September 1965). "32nd Annual U.S. National Soaring Championships". Soaring. 29 (9): 16–17. 
  21. ^ Reeves, E.J. (September 1964). "Pioneering the 1000 Kilometers". Soaring. 28 (9): 7–10. 
  22. ^ Wright, Red (July 1966). "Red Dog's Rebuttal". Soaring. 30 (7): 8. 
  23. ^ "Barringer Memorial Trophy Winner Mike Berger". Soaring. 31 (9): 9. September 1967. 
  24. ^ "Long Soaring Flights". Soaring. 30 (7): 6. July 1966. 
  25. ^ Scott, Wallace (November 1967). "The Second 500". Soaring. 31 (11): 22–24. 
  26. ^ Licher, Lloyd (March 1969). "SSA Annual Awards Banquet". Soaring. 33 (3): 27. 
  27. ^ Licher, Lloyd (February 1970). "SSA Annual Awards Banquet". Soaring. 34 (2): 22. 
  28. ^ Soaring. 35 (3): 11. March 1971.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  29. ^ Soaring. 35 (11): 42. November 1971.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  30. ^ "SSA in Action". Soaring. 37 (3): 7. March 1973. 
  31. ^ Soaring. 37 (11): 42. November 1973.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  32. ^ Soaring. 38 (7): 39. July 1974.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  33. ^ Soaring. 40 (4): 6. April 1976.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  34. ^ Soaring. 41 (4): 14. April 1977.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  35. ^ "The 7th Nationals SSA Convention". Soaring. 42 (4): 19. April 1978. 
  36. ^ Soaring. 41 (9): 7. September 1977.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  37. ^ Soaring. 43 (4): 10. April 1979.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  38. ^ "The SSA National Soaring Convention". Soaring. 44 (5): 20. May 1980. 
  39. ^ Griffith Jr., Marion (February 1982). "645 Miles in a 604". Soaring. 46 (2): 41–44. 
  40. ^ "The 1983 SSA International Soaring Convention". Soaring. 47 (5): 9. May 1983. 
  41. ^ Barrett, Vicki (December 1982). "FAI Badges". Soaring. 46 (12): 52. 
  42. ^ Said, Bob (April 1984). "The 1984 SSA International Convention". Soaring. 48 (4): 28. 
  43. ^ "National Soaring Convention". Soaring. 49 (4): 17. April 1985. 
  44. ^ "National Distance Records in the General Category". SSA. Retrieved 17 October 2011. 
  45. ^ "The 1986 SSA National Soaring Convention". Soaring. 50 (5): 24. May 1986. 
  46. ^ Sengebusch, Paul (May 1987). "A Colorado High!". Soaring. 5. 51: 15. 
  47. ^ Coleson, Arleen (November 1987). "FAI Badges & Other SSA Awards". Soaring. 51 (11): 51. 
  48. ^ Frazier, Terry (May 1989). "Sweetness and Light SSA Convention". Soaring. 53 (5): 16. 
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  50. ^ Coleson, Arleen (September 1990). "FAI Badges & Other SSA Awards". Soaring. 54 (9): 51. 
  51. ^ Coleson, Arleen (May 1992). "FAI Badges and Other SSA Awards". Soaring. 5. 56: 49. 
  52. ^ O'mahoney, Chuck (May 1993). "Soiree in Seattle". Soaring. 57 (5): 20. 
  53. ^ Coleson, Arleen (March 1994). "FAI Badges and Other SSA Awards". Soaring. 58 (3): 44. 
  54. ^ Coleson, Arleen (October 1994). "FAI Badges and Other SSA Awards". Soaring. 58 (10): 44. 
  55. ^ O'mahoney, Chuck (May 1996). "Huntsville was a Blast!". Soaring. 60 (5): 24. 
  56. ^ O'Mahoney, Chuck (April 1997). "Hi-Hooooo Silver". Soaring. 61 (4): 18. 
  57. ^ Ruprecht, Judy (August 1997). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 6. 61: 44. 
  58. ^ Ruprecht, Judy (December 1998). "Badge & Records". Soaring. 62 (12): 37. 
  59. ^ Thrasher, Bob (May 2000). "Enchantment in Albuquerque". Soaring. 64 (5): 19. 
  60. ^ Coleson, Arleen (November 2000). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 64 (11): 37. 
  61. ^ Coleson, Arleen (September 2001). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 65 (9): 40. 
  62. ^ Coleson, Arleen (September 2002). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 66 (9): 40. 
  63. ^ Woods, Chris (February 2006). "People of Soaring Phillipe Athuil". Soaring. 70 (2): 24–25. 
  64. ^ "The SSA Annual Awards". Soaring. 69 (5): 16. May 2005. 
  65. ^ Ruprecht, Judy (June 2004). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 6. 68: 44. 
  66. ^ "The 2005 SSA Annual Awards". Soaring. 70 (4): 20. April 2006. 
  67. ^ "The 2006 SSA Annual Awards". Soaring. 71 (4): 17. April 2007. 
  68. ^ Ruprecht, Judy (October 2007). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 71 (10): 50. 
  69. ^ Ruprecht, Judy (March 2009). "Badges & Records". Soaring. 73 (3): 45. 
  70. ^ "The 2010 Soaring Society of America Convention". Soaring. 74 (3): 16. March 2010. 
  71. ^ Maronde, Robert (June 12, 2013). "2013 Straight-Out Cross Country Soaring Results" (PDF). Soaring. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  72. ^ "July 2 OLC". Retrieved 9 May 2012. 
  73. ^ "The Lewin B. Barringer Memorial Trophy". Retrieved 9 May 2012. 
  74. ^ Layton, Denise (April 2013). "The Annual SSA Membership Meeting and Awards Banquet". Soaring. 77 (4): 26. 
  75. ^ "OLC Flight information - Kevin Wayt (US)". Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  76. ^ Layton, Denise (April 2014). "The 2014 SSA Convention". Soaring. 78 (4): 26. 
  77. ^ "OLC Flight information - Gordon Boettger (US)". Retrieved 23 April 2014. 

External links[edit]