Black Diamond, Washington

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Black Diamond, Washington
Location of Black Diamond, Washington
Location of Black Diamond, Washington
Coordinates: 47°19′4″N 122°0′53″W / 47.31778°N 122.01472°W / 47.31778; -122.01472Coordinates: 47°19′4″N 122°0′53″W / 47.31778°N 122.01472°W / 47.31778; -122.01472
CountryUnited States
StateWashington
CountyKing
Government
 • TypeMayor–council[1]
 • MayorCarol Benson[1]
Area
 • Total7.19 sq mi (18.63 km2)
 • Land6.55 sq mi (16.96 km2)
 • Water0.64 sq mi (1.67 km2)
Elevation
653 ft (199 m)
Population
 • Total4,697
 • Estimate 
(2021)[4]
5,839
 • Density729.92/sq mi (281.83/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (PST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
98010
Area code360
FIPS code53-06330
GNIS feature ID1516603[5]
Websiteblackdiamondwa.gov

Black Diamond is a city in King County, Washington, United States. The population was 4,697 at the 2020 census.[3] In 2021, with a 21% growth rate,[6] Black Diamond was the fastest growing small city in King County.[7]

History[edit]

Founding[edit]

Black Diamond was originally inhabited by the Bəqəlšuł, which is Lushootseed for "from a high point from which you can see", part of Coast Salish people. The area was home to a grill trap and smokehouse, and the tribe fished from Lake Sawyer.[8][9][10]

Black Diamond was officially incorporated on February 19, 1959. The town's late 20th century population growth has been mostly as a commuter community for people with jobs in Seattle, Bellevue, and suburban centers within the Seattle Metropolitan Area.[11]

Coal mining[edit]

Beginning in the 1880s Black Diamond was a rural coal mining area, developed by the Black Diamond Coal Mining Company of California, which owned and operated the mine.[12] The original residents were largely composed of former workers, from the company's previous coal mining operation in Nortonville, California, which primarily sold coal to the thriving new metropolis of San Francisco.[13] A combination of low quality coal from the Nortonville mines, water intrusion into the workings there, and the discovery and economical transport of higher-quality Washington coal to San Francisco spelled the demise of Nortonville in the early 1880s.[14] The town was home to around 3,500 people by the early 1900s, many of them European immigrants; most of the working men were involved in producing coal. This coal was transported to Seattle via the Pacific Coast Coal train. Before 1911, the miners were affiliated with the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA), but by March 1911 had left en masse to join the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).[15][16]

After World War I, the town shut down the mine as it was no longer viable. However a second mining boom spurred growth in the town in the early 1930s on the strength of multiple mining operations promoted by the Morris brothers through the Palmer Coking Coal Company. Mining has continued until recently through the Pacific Coast Coal Company, formerly of San Francisco. The prospect of future mining operations remains strong.

The Black Diamond Bakery

The main building of the Black Diamond Historical Museum is the former train station, which served the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway 1884–1916 and the Pacific Coast Railway 1916–1951. Regular passenger service ended in 1925, but a train still brought men to the mine until 1931, and trains continued to haul coal and freight into the 1940s.

Planned growth via master planned developments (MPDs)[edit]

In the 1990’s, the first Black Diamond city planner (Jason Paulsen), seized an opportunity to create a comprehensive development plan for the City of Black Diamond that when completed, would fundamentally change what and how the City of Black Diamond would evolve into — the first set of plans being the Growth Management Act (GMA) Comprehensive Plan, which included the concept of Master Planned Developments (MPDs).[17][18][19][20]

In 2008 156 acres are purchased for the first MPD.[21] In 2010 the first MPDs applications are filed with the City of Black Diamond.[22][23]

Legal action against first MPDs[edit]

From 2010 through 2018 legal battles were fought delaying development of the first MPDs:

  • In 2010 Toward Responsible Development filed a land use petition (LUPA) against the first two MPDs.[24]
  • In 2012 King County Superior Court denied the LUPA Toward Responsible Development filed with the Court of Appeals.[25]
  • In 2014 appeals Court Commissioner Masako Kanazawa ordered Toward Responsible Development to pay a total of $162,798, for attorney fees and costs, to YarrowBay and the City of Black Diamond.[26]
  • In 2016 Oakpointe (formerly YarrowBay) sued three City of Black Diamond Council members who opposed the MPDs.[27]
  • In 2017 Black Diamond council files suit against the mayor.[28]
  • In 2018 Black Diamond / Oakpointe settle lawsuit.[29]

First MPDs[edit]

The first two MPDs comprised 6,050 single and multi-family residences, 1.1 million square feet of commercial/office/retail space and were estimated to 15,000 new residents to the City of Black Diamond;[22] which would increase the population of the city by 3.6 times its size at the time (2010 population estimate of 4,151).[22]

In Dec of 2013 development started on the first MPD;[30] now known as Ten Trails.[31] In 2019 the first family moves into Ten Trails.[32]

In 2021, with a 21% growth rate,[6] Black Diamond was the fastest growing small city in King County.[7]

In March of 2022, 845 households were occupied in Ten Trails (722 residential homes, 76 apartment units, and 47 rental homes).[33]

Using King County's 2020 Person's per house hold rate of 2.43,[34] 845 households being occupied in Ten Trails in March of 2022,[33] the estimated population of Black Diamond in 2021 being 5,839,[35] concludes the estimated population living in Ten Trails in March of 2022 being 2,053 (845[33] * 2.43[34]); which roughly equates to 35% ( 2,053 / 5,839[35]) of the population of Black Diamond living in the first MPD (Ten Trails) during March of 2022.

Geography[edit]

Black Diamond is located at 47°19′4″N 122°0′53″W / 47.31778°N 122.01472°W / 47.31778; -122.01472 (47.317802, -122.014793).[36]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.66 square miles (17.25 km2), of which 6.02 square miles (15.59 km2) is land and 0.64 square miles (1.66 km2) is water.[37]

Demographics[edit]

Based on per capita income, one of the more reliable measures of affluence, Black Diamond ranks 64th of 522 areas in the state of Washington to be ranked.

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890561
19601,026
19701,16013.1%
19801,1700.9%
19901,42221.5%
20003,970179.2%
20104,1514.6%
20204,69713.2%
2021 (est.)5,839[4]24.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[38]
2020 Census[3]
Many early residents of Black Diamond came from Italy; this is one of many grave markers in the Black Diamond Cemetery with an Italian-language inscription. The cemetery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[39] of 2010, there were 4,151 people, 1,546 households, and 1,157 families living in the city. The population density was 689.5 inhabitants per square mile (266.2/km2). There were 1,685 housing units at an average density of 279.9 per square mile (108.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.0% White, 1.2% African American, 0.7% Native American, 1.2% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 1.3% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.6% of the population.

There were 1,546 households, of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 25.2% were non-families. 17.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 40.4 years. 25.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.7% were from 25 to 44; 32.1% were from 45 to 64; and 10% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.8% male and 50.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,970 people, 1,456 households, and 1,131 families living in the city. The population density was 739.5 people per square mile (285.4/km2). There were 1,538 housing units at an average density of 286.5 per square mile (110.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.43% White, 0.08% African American, 1.56% Native American, 1.01% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.88% from other races, and 3.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.70% of the population. 16.8% were of German, 13.2% Irish, 8.5% English and 7.4% Norwegian ancestry.

There were 1,456 households, out of which 41.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.2% were married couples living together, 8.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 17.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out, with 28.5% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 34.1% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $67,092, and the median income for a family was $72,981. Males had a median income of $51,792 versus $31,932 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,936. About 0.8% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

City landmarks[edit]

The City of Black Diamond has designated the following landmarks:

Landmark Built Listed Address Photo
Black Diamond Cemetery[40] c. 1880 2000 Cemetery Hill Road
Black Diamond Cemetery 04.jpg
Black Diamond Miners' Cabin[40] c. 1882 1995 24311 Morgan Street
Luigi & Aurora Pagani House[40] c.1896 2001 32901 Merino Street Black Diamond, WA - Luigi & Aurora Pagani House 01.jpg

Government and politics[edit]

Black Diamond remains one of the few right-leaning or Republican areas in King County. While Donald Trump carried the city twice, he did so both times by small margins.

Presidential Elections Results[41]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 50.54% 1,635 46.52% 1,505 2.94% 95

Notable people[edit]

The town has been home to some famous residents, including folk musician Brandi Carlile.[42] The minor-league baseball star Edo Vanni was born at Black Diamond in 1918.[43]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mayor & Council". City of Black Diamond. Retrieved March 28, 2022.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c "Explore Census Data". Explore Census Data. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 11, 2022.
  4. ^ a b "City and Town Population Totals: 2020-2021". United States Census Bureau. June 22, 2022. Retrieved June 22, 2022.
  5. ^ "Black Diamond". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior.
  6. ^ a b Bureau, US Census. "City and Town Population Totals: 2020-2021". Census.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  7. ^ a b "Seattle's population dropped, but another King County city saw fastest growth in WA". The Seattle Times. 2022-05-26. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  8. ^ Hollenbeck, Jan L; Moss, Madonna; United States; Forest Service; Pacific Northwest Region (1987). A cultural resource overview: prehistory, ethnography and history : Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Portland, Oregon: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region. OCLC 892024380.
  9. ^ Ruby, Robert H. (2010). A guide to the Indian tribes of the Pacific Northwest. John A. Brown, Cary C. Collins, M. Dale Kinkade, Sean O'Neill (3rd ed.). Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0-8061-4024-7. OCLC 557404302.
  10. ^ Deloria Jr., Vine (2012). Indians of the Pacific Northwest : From the Coming of the White Man to the Present Day. Golden: Fulcrum Publishing. ISBN 978-1-68275-051-3. OCLC 820070401.
  11. ^ McNichols, Joshua (November 9, 2019). "A Smart Home Neighborhood: Residents Find It Enjoyably Convenient Or A Bit Creepy". NPR News. Retrieved November 11, 2019.
  12. ^ The move of coal miners from Nortonville, California to Black Diamond, Washington Territory, 1885 by Jacqueline Byer Dial, 1980.
  13. ^ Black Diamond: Mining the Memories, edited by Diane and Cory Olson, 1988.
  14. ^ The History of Nortonville, by Robert Kishaba, 1961.
  15. ^ Bragg, Nick. "IWW Yearbook 1911". IWW History Project. University of Washington. Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved April 20, 2016.
  16. ^ "A New Local". Industrial Worker. Vol. 2, no. 51. March 9, 1911. p. 3.
  17. ^ McNichols, Joshua (2018-10-24). "The dream of Black Diamond's big development is an alternative to suburban sprawl". www.kuow.org. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  18. ^ King County (1996-10-09). "Ordinance No. 12535". kingcounty.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  19. ^ "Toward Responsible Dev. v. City of Black Diamond, No. 69418-9-I | Casetext Search + Citator". casetext.com. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  20. ^ Neuts, Dana (2011-04-15). "Neighborhood of the week: Black Diamond is scenic, historic and quaint". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  21. ^ "Tentative sale of county land could bring big housing development $51 million deal for 'donut hole'". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. 2008-10-01. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  22. ^ a b c "YarrowBay Mitigation Agreement | Maple Valley WA". www.maplevalleywa.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  23. ^ City of Black Diamond (2010-09-28). "Ordinance No. 10-946" (PDF). www.blackdiamondwa.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ Box, Dennis (2010-10-13). "Toward Responsible Development files appeal against YarrowBay developments in Black Diamond | Read Document". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  25. ^ Box, Dennis (2013-12-12). "Groundbreaking work on YarrowBay's The Villages development begins | Black Diamond". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  26. ^ Box, Dennis (2014-10-01). "Attorney fees and costs awarded to YarrowBay and Black Diamond by Court of Appeals commissioner". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  27. ^ "Developer sues Black Diamond council members who oppose his project". The Seattle Times. 2016-12-02. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  28. ^ Miller-Still, Ray (2017-11-01). "Black Diamond council files suit against mayor; Oakpointe files to intervene". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  29. ^ Kear, Kathleen (2018-02-13). "Black Diamond /Oakpointe OPMA Lawsuit Settles". VOICE of the Valley. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  30. ^ Box, Dennis (2013-12-12). "Groundbreaking work on YarrowBay's The Villages development begins | Black Diamond". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  31. ^ Registry, The (2018-01-11). "136 Acres of Undeveloped Land in Black Diamond, Washington, Sell for $18.6MM". The Registry. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  32. ^ Miller-Still, Ray (2018-07-19). "First family officially moves into Ten Trails". Covington-Maple Valley Reporter. Retrieved 2022-06-29.
  33. ^ a b c City of Black Diamond (2022-03-15). "2022 Update by Mayor Carol Benson" (PDF). www.blackdiamondwa.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  34. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: King County, Washington". www.census.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-30.
  35. ^ a b Bureau, US Census. "City and Town Population Totals: 2020-2021". Census.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-30.
  36. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  37. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved December 19, 2012.
  38. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved May 24, 2014.
  39. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 19, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c King County and Local Landmarks List[dead link], King County (undated, last modified February 26, 2003). Accessed online May 8, 2009.
  41. ^ King County Elections
  42. ^ Scanlon, Tom (2005-07-12). "Maple Valley singer Brandi Carlile getting nationwide buzz". The Seattle Times. Retrieved April 6, 2022.
  43. ^ Raley, Dan (May 1, 2007). "Edo Vanni, 1918-2007: As player, manager, promoter, he was '100 percent baseball'". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved April 6, 2022.