Davey O'Brien Award

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Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award
Awarded for the collegiate American football player judged to be the best of all NCAA quarterbacks (current)
the best NCAA football player playing in the southwestern United States (original)
Location The Fort Worth Club, Fort Worth Texas
Country United States
Presented by Davey O'Brien Foundation
First awarded 1977, became a quarterback-only award in 1981
Currently held by Deshaun Watson, Clemson
Official website http://www.daveyobrien.com/

The Davey O'Brien Award, officially the Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award, named after Davey O'Brien, is presented annually to the collegiate American football player adjudged by the Davey O'Brien Foundation to be the best of all National Collegiate Athletic Association quarterbacks. The Davey O'Brien Hall of Fame is housed at The Fort Worth Club in Fort Worth, Texas. The annual awards dinner and trophy presentation is held there as well usually in February.

In 1977, directly after the death of O'Brien, the award was established as the Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy, and was given to the most outstanding player in the Southwest. Texas running back Earl Campbell won the trophy in 1977,[1] Oklahoma running back Billy Sims won it in 1978, and Baylor linebacker Mike Singletary won it twice in 1979 and 1980. In 1981, the award was renamed the Davey O'Brien Award.

Since the renaming of the award in 1981, four players have won the award twice: Ty Detmer of BYU, Danny Wuerffel of Florida, Jason White of Oklahoma, and Deshaun Watson of Clemson.

The Executive Director of the Davey O'Brien Award is Bill Brady.[citation needed]

Winners[edit]

Davey O'Brien Memorial Trophy[edit]

Year Player School
1977 Earl Campbell Texas
1978 Billy Sims Oklahoma
1979 Mike Singletary Baylor
1980 Mike Singletary Baylor

Davey O'Brien Award[edit]

Year Player School
1981 Jim McMahon BYU
1982 Todd Blackledge Penn State
1983 Steve Young BYU
1984 Doug Flutie Boston College
1985 Chuck Long Iowa
1986 Vinny Testaverde Miami (FL)
1987 Don McPherson Syracuse
1988 Troy Aikman UCLA
1989 Andre Ware Houston
1990 Ty Detmer BYU
1991 Ty Detmer BYU
1992 Gino Torretta Miami (FL)
1993 Charlie Ward Florida State
1994 Kerry Collins Penn State
1995 Danny Wuerffel Florida
1996 Danny Wuerffel Florida
1997 Peyton Manning[2] Tennessee
1998 Michael Bishop Kansas State
1999 Joe Hamilton Georgia Tech
2000 Chris Weinke Florida State
2001 Eric Crouch[3] Nebraska
2002 Brad Banks Iowa
2003 Jason White Oklahoma
2004 Jason White[4] Oklahoma
2005 Vince Young Texas
2006 Troy Smith Ohio State
2007 Tim Tebow Florida
2008 Sam Bradford Oklahoma
2009 Colt McCoy Texas
2010 Cam Newton Auburn
2011 Robert Griffin III Baylor
2012 Johnny Manziel Texas A&M
2013 Jameis Winston Florida State
2014 Marcus Mariota Oregon
2015 Deshaun Watson Clemson
2016 Deshaun Watson Clemson

References[edit]

  1. ^ "O'Brien Memorial taken by Campbell". Lawrence Journal-World. Associated Press. January 19, 1978. p. 13. Retrieved June 28, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Manning, Woodson earn football honors". Ocala Star-Banner. Associated Press. December 12, 1997. p. 3C. Retrieved December 5, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Crouch takes O'Brien and Camp Awards". McCook Daily Gazette. Associated Press. December 7, 2001. p. 12. Retrieved October 17, 2016. 
  4. ^ "White Takes Maxwell, Davey O'Brien Awards". Park City Daily News. Associated Press. December 10, 2004. p. 10C. Retrieved October 17, 2016. 

External links[edit]