Energoatom

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Energoatom
State-owned enterprise
IndustryNuclear power
Founded1996; 23 years ago (1996)
Headquarters,
Area served
Ukraine
Key people
Yuriy O. Nedashkovsky (President[1]
ProductsElectricity
Production output
81.2 TWh (2016)[2]
RevenueDecrease 1.371 billion (2016)[2]
Decrease €6.54 million (2016)[2]
Total assetsIncrease €7.211 billion (2016)[2]
OwnerGovernment of Ukraine
Number of employees
34,950 (2016)[2]
ParentMinistry of Fuel and Energy
DivisionsNuclear Power Plants, Wind Power Plants, Supporting Agencies
Websitewww.atom.gov.ua

Energoatom, full name National Nuclear Energy Generating Company of Ukraine (Ukrainian: НАЕК "Енергоатом") is a Ukrainian state enterprise operating all four nuclear power stations in Ukraine.[3]

As of 2016, Energoatom had an installed capacity of 14,148 MW and generated 81.2 TWh of electricity.[2]

Overview[edit]

Ukraine ranks seventh in the world and fifth in Europe in terms of the number of nuclear reactors operated, total capacity and electricity produced.

The Ukrainian nuclear power industry employs more than 38,000 people. In recent years, using only 69.0% of the installed capacity, nuclear power plants have under maximum autumn and winter loads generated about 53% of the country's electricity. Overall the share of electricity generation is about 47%. Currently there are 15 operating power units,[3] including 13 units with VVER-1000 (PWR) reactors, and 2 units of the newer subtype of the VVER-440 reactor.

Energoatom is engaged in construction of new power units and rehabilitation of those in operation, purchases of nuclear fuel and removal of radioactive waste, establishing a national infrastructure for spent fuel and radioactive waste management, maintenance of safety at nuclear facilities, retraining and qualification upgrades, and resolution of social problems of the employees.

According to the Energy Strategy of Ukraine, NNEGC Energoatom plans to:

  • select 3–4 new sites for construction of new NPPs;
  • develop a feasibility study for construction of power units to a total capacity of 6 GW on new sites during 2019–2021;
  • substantiate and make a decision on service life extension of the pilot reactor Rivne Unit 1 and subsequently the rest of the fleet depending upon design service life termination periods;
  • commission Khmelnitsky Unit 2 and Unit 3 for a total capacity of 2 GW by the year 2016.

In the longer term, the company intends to:

  • put into operation replacement and additional power units to total capacity of 12.5 GW from 2024 through 2030;
  • launch decommissioning activities for six power units once their extended service life terminates;
  • initiate construction of new capacities rated in total at 6.5 GW in 2027–2030 to allow for commissioning after 2030.

Presidents[edit]

Recent history[edit]

In 2011 Energoatom began a project to bring safety into line with international standards at an estimated cost of $1.8 billion, with a target completion date of 2017. In 2015 the completion date was put back to 2020, due to financing delays.[4]

In 2015 some government agencies made corruption allegations against Energoatom, with concerns raised by Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk.[5] In March 2016, Energoatom's assets and bank accounts were frozen by Ukrainian courts over allegedly unpaid debts; Energoatom is appealing the decision, but the frozen finances have led to contractual breaches.[6][7] In June 2016 its bank accounts were unfrozen.[8]

In July 2019, a new wholesale energy market for Ukraine was launched, intended to bring real competition in the generation market and help future integration with Europe. The change was a prerequisite for receiving European Union assistance. It led to in increased price for industrial consumers of between 14% to 28% during July. The bulk of Energoatom output is sold to the government’s "guaranteed buyer" to keep prices more stable for domestic customers.[9][10]

List of companies[edit]

Nuclear Power Stations[edit]

Name Location Coordinates Type Capacity, MWe Operational Notes
Khmelnytsky Netishyn 50°18′09″N 26°38′52″E / 50.302512°N 26.647875°E / 50.302512; 26.647875 (Khmelnytsky CPP, Unit 1) VVER 1000 1987–
50°18′07″N 26°39′00″E / 50.302005°N 26.649935°E / 50.302005; 26.649935 (Khmelnytsky CPP, Unit 2) VVER 1000 2004–
Rivne Varash 51°19′37″N 25°53′26″E / 51.326857°N 25.890634°E / 51.326857; 25.890634 (Rivne Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1) VVER 402 1980–
51°19′35″N 25°53′31″E / 51.326402°N 25.891943°E / 51.326402; 25.891943 (Rivne Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 2) VVER 417 1981–
51°19′28″N 25°53′43″E / 51.324538°N 25.895376°E / 51.324538; 25.895376 (Rivne Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3) VVER 1000 1986–
51°19′25″N 25°53′53″E / 51.323505°N 25.898037°E / 51.323505; 25.898037 (Rivne Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 4) VVER 1000 2004–
South Ukraine Yuzhnoukrainsk 47°48′43″N 31°13′03″E / 47.812031°N 31.217372°E / 47.812031; 31.217372 (South Ukraine CPP, Unit 1) VVER 1000 1982–
47°48′43″N 31°13′09″E / 47.812059°N 31.219298°E / 47.812059; 31.219298 (South Ukraine CPP, Unit 2) VVER 1000 1985–
47°48′44″N 31°13′20″E / 47.812211°N 31.222286°E / 47.812211; 31.222286 (South Ukraine CPP, Unit 3) VVER 1000 1989–
Zaporizhzhia Enerhodar 47°30′31″N 34°35′04″E / 47.508519°N 34.584392°E / 47.508519; 34.584392 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 1) VVER 1000 1984– largest nuclear power plant in Europe
47°30′35″N 34°35′07″E / 47.509838°N 34.585165°E / 47.509838; 34.585165 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 2) VVER 1000 1985–
47°30′40″N 34°35′09″E / 47.511172°N 34.585894°E / 47.511172; 34.585894 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 3) VVER 1000 1986–
47°30′45″N 34°35′12″E / 47.512491°N 34.586624°E / 47.512491; 34.586624 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 4) VVER 1000 1987–
47°30′50″N 34°35′15″E / 47.513839°N 34.587364°E / 47.513839; 34.587364 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 5) VVER 1000 1989–
47°30′55″N 34°35′17″E / 47.515157°N 34.588126°E / 47.515157; 34.588126 (Zaporizhzhia CPP, Unit 6) VVER 1000 1995–

Other Power Stations[edit]

Name Type Location Coordinates Generator Capacity, MWe Operational Number
Donuzlav Wind Novoozerne 45°24′06″N 33°09′22″E / 45.401667°N 33.156111°E / 45.401667; 33.156111 (Donuzlav WPP) USW 56–100 6.82 1993– 62
Sudak Wind Meganom Ridge 44°48′43″N 35°04′39″E / 44.811923°N 35.077537°E / 44.811923; 35.077537 (Sudak WPP) USW 56–100 3.85 35
Chornomorske Wind Chornomorske 45°29′14″N 32°44′33″E / 45.487095°N 32.742452°E / 45.487095; 32.742452 (Chornomorske WPP) T600-48 1.2 2
Tashlyk Pumped Storage Yuzhnoukrainsk 47°47′49″N 31°10′53″E / 47.797013°N 31.181404°E / 47.797013; 31.181404 (Tashlyk HAPP) ? 302 2006– 2
Oleksandrivka Hydroelectric Oleksandrivka 47°47′49″N 31°10′53″E / 47.797013°N 31.181404°E / 47.797013; 31.181404 (Oleksandrivka HES) ? 11.5 1999– 2
  • Bolhrad Steam Gas Power Plant (planning)

Supporting companies[edit]

  • State Concern "Yaderne Palyvo" (Nuclear Fuel)
    • Eastern Ore refining combine
    • Smoly (formerly Dnieper Chemical Factory)
    • Dnieper Plant of Precision Pipes
    • Ukrainian Science Researching and Design Projecting Institute of Industrial Technology (UkrNDPRI)

Unfinished Nuclear Power Plants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The management". Energoatom. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "ENERGOATOM TODAY (2016)" (PDF). energoatom.kiev.ua. Energoatom. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  3. ^ a b Energoatom chief Kim overstepped his powers when signing contract, failed to show up for questioning, says interior minister, Interfax-Ukraine (12 June 2013)
  4. ^ "Ukraine aims to complete safety upgrade program in 2020". World Nuclear News. 7 August 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  5. ^ "Energoatom chief recalls highs and lows of first half-year". World Nuclear News. 12 August 2015. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  6. ^ "Continued Ukraine-Russia tensions over fuel". Nuclear Engineering International. 7 June 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  7. ^ "Ex-head of Energoatom Derkach claims worst situation in sector in 25 years". Interfax-Ukraine. 23 May 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  8. ^ "Energoatom's accounts unblocked". Interfax-Ukraine. 29 June 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  9. ^ Prokip, Andrian (6 May 2019). "Liberalizing Ukraine's Electricity Market: Benefits and Risks". Wilson Centre. Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  10. ^ Kossov, Igor (2 August 2019). "New energy market brings controversy". Kyiv Post. Retrieved 2 August 2019.

External links[edit]