Fish finger

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Fishsticks" redirects here. For the South Park episode, see Fishsticks (South Park).
Fried fish fingers
Baked fish fingers on baking paper
Filling inside a fish finger

Fish fingers, known as fish sticks in American and Canadian English and by translations of that name in most other languages, are a processed food made using a whitefish, such as cod, haddock or pollock, which has been battered or breaded.

They are commonly available in the frozen food section of supermarkets. They can be baked in the oven, grilled, shallow fried, or deep-fried.


The term "fish fingers" is first referenced in a recipe given in a British popular magazine in 1900.[1]

The commercialization of fish fingers may be traced to 1953 when the American company Gorton-Pew Fisheries, now known as Gorton's, was the first company to introduce a frozen ready-to-cook fish finger; the product, named Gorton’s Fish Sticks, won the Parents magazine Seal of Approval in 1956.[2]

There was an abundance of herring in the United Kingdom after World War II. Clarence Birdseye test-marketed herring fish fingers, a product he had discovered in the US,[3][4] under the name "herring savouries". These were tested in Southampton and South Wales against "cod sticks", a comparably bland product used as a control. Shoppers, however, confounded expectations by showing an overwhelming preference for the cod.[5]


The fish used may be either fillets cut to shape or minced/ground fish reformed to shape. Those made entirely from fillets are generally regarded as the higher quality products and will typically have a prominent sign on the box stating that the fish is 100% fillet. Minced fish is more commonly used in store brand economy products. They may have either batter or breadcrumbs around the outside as casing, although the coating is normally breadcrumbs.

In addition to white fish, fish fingers are sometimes made with salmon.[6]

In popular culture[edit]

Fish fingers are often considered emblematic of the United Kingdom. [7]

See also[edit]