Grosvenor Street, Sydney

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Grosvenor Street
New South Wales
(1) Johnsons Building.JPG
Johnson's Building, located on Grosvenor Street
General information
Type Street
Length 350 m (1,100 ft)[1]
Major junctions
East end George Street
West end York Street / Bradfield Highway

Grosvenor Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. Grosvenor Street runs 350 metres (1,150 ft)[1] in an east to west direction, with traffic flowing in both directions. The eastern terminus is at George Street and the western terminus is at the junction of York Street with the Bradfield Highway. There are no major cross streets.

Originally named Charlotte Square by Governor Macquarie in 1810 in honour of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III, Grosvenor Street was renamed in 1889 after the Grosvenor Hotel that was located at the intersection of intersection of Grosvenor and Cumberland Streets.[2]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Grosvenor Place – This is a high-rise development designed by architect Harry Seidler and built in 1982-87. It occupies the block bounded by Grosvenor, George, Harrington and Essex Streets. The front foyer houses a number of paintings by the American artist Frank Stella.[3]
  • Royal Naval House – Also of the Federation Free Classical style, this building was designed by Varney Parkes and built between 1890 and 1907. Initially used by the Royal Australian Navy as accommodation and amenities for naval personnel, the building is currently used as part of the Sydney Futures Exchange. It is located next door to Federation Hall and courtyard and was restored along with that building. It is also listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.[5]
  • Federation Hall and courtyard – Constructed in the late Victorian style between 1889 and 1891, the Federation Hall and courtyard is located at 24-30 Grosvenor Street and is currently used as the Sydney Futures Exchange. The building was extended substantially from 1923-24 and was at one stage known as the Meat Board Building. It is located next door to Royal Naval House and was restored along with that building. It is also listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.[6]
  • St Patrick's Catholic Church – This church was designed by J. F. Hilly and built 1840-44.[3] Founded by Father Therry, it was the first Catholic church in Sydney and became the central church for the Irish community.
  • Church Hall – Situated next to St Patrick's, the church hall was designed by Hennessy and Hennessy and built in 1914. It features the "blood and bandages" style composed of red bricks with contrasting white areas, and was influenced by British architects Mackintosh and Voysey.
  • Lang Park – This park is a roughly triangular site situated on the corner of Grosvenor and York Streets.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Western Distributor & York St & Grosvenor St, New South Wales 2000 to 32 Grosvenor St, Sydney NSW 2000 (Map). Google Maps. 2016. Retrieved 26 December 2016. 
  2. ^ "Grosvenor Street Heritage Walk". Visit Sydney, Australia. Phoenix Group Co. 2015. Retrieved 26 December 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c Haskell, John (1997). Sydney Architecture. UNSW Press. p. 39. 
  4. ^ "Johnson's Building". NSW State Heritage Register. Office of Environment & Heritage, Government of New South Wales. 30 March 2011. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  5. ^ "Royal Naval House". NSW State Heritage Register. Office of Environment & Heritage, Government of New South Wales. 5 September 2008. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 
  6. ^ "Federation Hall and courtyard". NSW State Heritage Register. Office of Environment & Heritage, Government of New South Wales. 30 March 2011. Retrieved 27 December 2016. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Grosvenor Street, Sydney at Wikimedia Commons