Independence Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Independence, NJ)
Jump to: navigation, search
Independence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Independence
Pequest River Valley farms
Pequest River Valley farms
Map of Independence Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Independence Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Independence Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Independence Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′48″N 74°52′35″W / 40.880001°N 74.876253°W / 40.880001; -74.876253Coordinates: 40°52′48″N 74°52′35″W / 40.880001°N 74.876253°W / 40.880001; -74.876253[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Warren
Formed November 11, 1782
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for American independence
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
 • Mayor Robert E. Giordano (R, term ends December 31, 2017)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerk Deborah M. Hrebenak[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 19.894 sq mi (51.525 km2)
 • Land 19.744 sq mi (51.137 km2)
 • Water 0.150 sq mi (0.388 km2)  0.75%
Area rank 143rd of 566 in state
10th of 22 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 518 ft (158 m)
Population (2010)[8][9][10]
 • Total 5,662
 • Estimate (2016)[11] 5,506
 • Rank 361st of 566 in state
9th of 22 in county[12]
 • Density 286.8/sq mi (110.7/km2)
 • Density rank 484th of 566 in state
10th of 22 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07838 - Great Meadows[13][14]
Area code(s) 908 exchange: 637[15]
FIPS code 3404133930[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882244[1][18]
Website www.independencenj.com

Independence Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 5,662,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 59 (+1.1%) from the 5,603 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,663 (+42.2%) from the 3,940 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] The township is part of the eastern region of the Lehigh Valley.

Independence Township was originally created on November 11, 1782, from Hardwick Township, while the area was still part of Sussex County, and was incorporated as one of the state's initial group of 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Most of Independence Township became part of the newly created Warren County on November 20, 1824, with the remainder becoming part of Green Township in Sussex County. Portions of the township were taken to form Hackettstown (March 9, 1853) and Allamuchy Township (April 4, 1873).[20] The township was named for American independence.[21]

History[edit]

The Township of Independence was established by an act of the New Jersey Legislature in 1782. This occurred through the division of Hardwick Township which at that time made it a section of Sussex County. Through another act of the State Legislature in 1825, it was one of the seven large southerly townships, formerly in Sussex County, which together comprised the area that became Warren County. As the seven townships gradually were subdivided, Independence was reduced to half its original size through the loss of Hackettstown in 1853 and Allamuchy Township in 1873.[20] The population thereby decreased to around 1,000, having the boundaries that it has today. It is roughly eight miles long from the northwest to the southeast corners, about 6 square miles (16 km2) across its widest point and covers an area of 20.4 square miles (53 km2).

Through the Township the major brooks and the Great Meadows drain into the Pequest River which winds slowly from northeast to southwest to flow on through the County and eventually into the Delaware River at Belvidere. Part of the eastern land drains under the Morris Canal bed and south into the Musconetcong River just below the boundary with Mansfield Township. The hillsides are steep, layered with rock and limestone while the valleys still hold soil deposited here from the receding glaciers. Mastodon bones and a few relics of the early Indian dwellers still occasionally can be found as well as coveys of game birds, some white tail deer and small game.

This area was initially settled and cleared as farmland for growing hay and grain or as pastureland. Timber was cut for lumber, grain was milled into flour, and some iron ore was mined from the Jenny Jump Mountain area during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. The mining of iron ore which attracted the early settlers, the later iron foundries, and many of the early industries have disappeared as has the Morris Canal and the railroads as the major means of shipping freight. After many attempts the Great Meadow was drained with the water channeled to permit successful development of commercial vegetable production. Shipping over the years has been by wagon, small trucks, rail freight, and then by large trailer trucks.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 19.894 square miles (51.525 km2), including 19.744 square miles (51.137 km2) of land and 0.150 square miles (0.388 km2) of water (0.75%).[1][2]

Great Meadows (2010 Census population of 303[22]) and Vienna (population of 981 as of 2010[23]) are unincorporated communities and census-designated places (CDPs) located within the township.[24][25][26] Through the 2000 United States Census, the areas were grouped together as Great Meadows-Vienna, which had a population of 1,264 as of that year.[27]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Petersburgh.[28]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,224
1820 1,850 51.1%
1830 2,126 14.9%
1840 2,140 0.7%
1850 2,621 22.5%
1860 1,871 * −28.6%
1870 1,766 −5.6%
1880 1,018 * −42.4%
1890 904 −11.2%
1900 805 −11.0%
1910 867 7.7%
1920 933 7.6%
1930 964 3.3%
1940 1,046 8.5%
1950 1,169 11.8%
1960 1,509 29.1%
1970 2,057 36.3%
1980 2,829 37.5%
1990 3,940 39.3%
2000 5,603 42.2%
2010 5,662 1.1%
Est. 2016 5,506 [11][29] −2.8%
Population sources:
1810-1920[30] 1840[31] 1850-1870[32]
1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[20]

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,662 people, 2,234 households, and 1,506 families residing in the township. The population density was 286.8 per square mile (110.7/km2). There were 2,325 housing units at an average density of 117.8 per square mile (45.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.43% (5,290) White, 1.22% (69) Black or African American, 0.09% (5) Native American, 2.23% (126) Asian, 0.07% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.61% (91) from other races, and 1.36% (77) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.42% (307) of the population.[8]

There were 2,234 households out of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.13.[8]

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,844 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,094) and the median family income was $104,808 (+/- $8,796). Males had a median income of $72,719 (+/- $6,017) versus $58,413 (+/- $7,006) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,372 (+/- $2,731). About 1.6% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 5,603 people, 2,146 households, and 1,489 families residing in the township. The population density was 282.4 people per square mile (109.0/km²). There were 2,210 housing units at an average density of 111.4 per square mile (43.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.98% White, 1.16% African American, 0.05% Native American, 1.73% Asian, 0.79% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.77% of the population.[39][40]

There were 2,146 households out of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.18.[39][40]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.8% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 34.9% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the township was $67,247, and the median income for a family was $79,819. Males had a median income of $59,688 versus $37,643 for females. The per capita income for the township was $30,555. About 1.2% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Independence Township is governed under the Township form of government. The five-member Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][42] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2017, members of the Independence Township Committee are Mayor Robert M. Giordano (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2018; term as mayor ends 2017), Glenn Cougle (R, 2018), Carmen Feula (R, 2017), Bonnie Kelsey (R, 2017) and Michael S. Pennington (R, 2019).[3][43][44][45][46][47]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Independence Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[48] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][49][50] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Independence Township had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[51]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[53] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[54][55]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township).[56] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[57] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[58]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are chosen at-large on a staggered basis in partisan elections with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2014, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014) and Freeholder Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2016).[59] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[60] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[61][62] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,789 registered voters in Independence Township, of which 691 (18.2% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,384 (36.5% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,709 (45.1% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[64] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 66.9% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 87.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[64][65]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,500 votes (58.8% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 964 votes (37.8% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 51 votes (2.0% vs. 1.7%), among the 2,550 ballots cast by the township's 3,836 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.5% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[66][67] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,559 votes (55.7% vs. 55.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,159 votes (41.4% vs. 41.4%) and other candidates with 49 votes (1.8% vs. 1.6%), among the 2,797 ballots cast by the township's 3,784 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.9% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,763 votes (64.4% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 927 votes (33.9% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 35 votes (1.3% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,736 ballots cast by the township's 3,518 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.8% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[69]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 72.5% of the vote (1,037 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.3% (376 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (17 votes), among the 1,450 ballots cast by the township's 3,879 registered voters (20 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 37.4%.[70][71] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,176 votes (63.8% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 435 votes (23.6% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 182 votes (9.9% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 24 votes (1.3% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,842 ballots cast by the township's 3,733 registered voters, yielding a 49.3% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[72]

Education[edit]

Public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Great Meadows Regional School District, together with students from Liberty Township.[73] The New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division blocked a 2007 effort by Liberty Township to leave the Great Meadows district based on Liberty's greater share of district costs, with the court citing the inability of the two communities to provide an efficient education separately.[74] As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its three schools had an enrollment of 1,175 students and 69.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 17.0:1.[75] Schools in the district (with 2014-15 school year enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[76]) are Central Elementary School[77] (201 students in grades K-2), Liberty Elementary School[78] (262; 3-5) and Great Meadows Middle School[79] (297; 6-8).[80][81]

Students attending public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Hackettstown High School which serves students from Hackettstown, along with students from the townships of Allamuchy and Liberty, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Hackettstown School District.[82][80] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 923 students and 68.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.5:1.[83]

Students from the township and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[84] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[85] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[80][86]

Transportation[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 46.85 miles (75.40 km) of roadways, of which 32.70 miles (52.63 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.26 miles (14.90 km) by Warren County and 4.89 miles (7.87 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

CR 517 passes through in the eastern part of the township[88] while U.S. Route 46 traverses 4.89 miles (7.87 km) across the southern part of the municipality.[89]

Interstate 80 misses the township by less than 100 feet, but is accessible in both neighboring Allamuchy Township (exit 19) and Hope Township (exit 12).[90]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Independence Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Independence Township. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Township of Independence. Accessed August 8, 2016.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Independence, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Independence township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Independence township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Great Meadows, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Great Meadows, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 246. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  21. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 2, 2015.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Great Meadows CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  23. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Vienna CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  24. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  25. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  26. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, p. III-5, August 2012. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  27. ^ DP-1Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Great Meadows-Vienna CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  28. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed April 1, 2015.
  29. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  32. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed June 6, 2013. "Independence contained in 1850, 2,621 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,871; and in 1870, 1,766. The Allamuche and Jenny Jump Mountains are in this township."
  33. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Independence township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Independence township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Independence township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  42. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  43. ^ 2017 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Independence Township. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  44. ^ 2017 Official Directory Warren County, New Jersey, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed August 7, 2016.
  45. ^ General Election November 8, 2016, Warren County Official Tally, Warren County, New Jersey, updated November 16, 2016. Accessed January 30, 2017.
  46. ^ General Election November 3, 2015 Warren County Official Tally, Warren County, New Jersey, updated November 6, 2015. Accessed August 7, 2016.
  47. ^ General Election November 4, 2014 Warren County Official Tally, Warren County, New Jersey, updated November 10, 2014. Accessed August 7, 2016.
  48. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ 2017 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed April 14, 2017.
  50. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  51. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 59, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  52. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  53. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  54. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  55. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  56. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 17, 2016.
  57. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  58. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  59. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  60. ^ County Clerk's Office, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  61. ^ Message from Surrogate, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  62. ^ Constitutional Officers, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  63. ^ 2013 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  64. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Warren, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  65. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  66. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  67. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  68. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  69. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  70. ^ "Governor - Warren County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  71. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Warren County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014. 
  72. ^ 2009 Governor: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  73. ^ Great Meadows Regional School District 2014 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 16, 2017. "Great Meadows Regional is a K-8 school district with an enrollment of approximately 900 students. High school students attend Hackettstown High School as part of a sending/ receiving agreement. Great Meadows Regional consists of the contiguous townships of Independence and Liberty, is located in central Warren County and encompasses 32.35 square miles."
  74. ^ Novak, Stephen J. "State court says Liberty Township cannot withdraw from Great Meadows school district", The Express-Times, April 2, 2009. Accessed June 6, 2013. "Formed in 1993, Great Meadows has three schools: Liberty Elementary, Independence Township Central School and Great Meadows Regional Middle School. Both townships send students to Hackettstown High School for grades nine through 12. Liberty Township sought to break from Independence Township in 2004 after a contentious budget season."
  75. ^ District information for Great Meadows Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  76. ^ School Data for the Great Meadows Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  77. ^ Central Elementary School, Great Meadows Regional School District. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  78. ^ Liberty Elementary School, Great Meadows Regional School District. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  79. ^ Great Meadows Middle School, Great Meadows Regional School District. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  80. ^ a b c Municipal Guide to Public School Districts, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed May 16, 2017.
  81. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Great Meadows Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  82. ^ Hackettstown High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 16, 2017. "Hackettstown High School serves the communities of Hackettstown, Allamuchy, Independence, and Liberty."
  83. ^ School data for Hackettstown High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 12, 2016.
  84. ^ F.A.Q., Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed November 14, 2016. "Enrollment is open, on a space available basis, to all K-8 students residing in N.J. with priority given to students residing in the districts of Blairstown, Hardwick, Knowlton, Frelinghuysen, and North Warren Regional School."
  85. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  86. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  87. ^ Warren County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  88. ^ County Route 517 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, November 2012 Accessed July 21, 2016.
  89. ^ U.S. Route 46 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, November 2012 Accessed July 21, 2016.
  90. ^ Interstate 80 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, April 2014. Accessed July 21, 2016.
  91. ^ Craig, Kyle. "This Warren County, Parkettes gymnast is vying for an Olympic spot Friday", The Express-Times, July 7, 2016. Accessed May 16, 2017. "Desiderio, who's from Independence Township, placed 12th in the all-around scoring during the P&G Gymnastics Championships in St. Louis last month, earning a spot at the Olympic Trials and place on the senior national team."
  92. ^ "THE 1994 CAMPAIGN; The Election: A Voters' Guide To the Candidates", The New York Times, November 6, 1994. Accessed September 11, 2013. "Born in the Bronx, now lives in Independence, in rural Warren County."

External links[edit]