Inishturk

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Inishturk
Native name: Inis Toirc
Inishturk north.jpg
North coast of Inishturk
Inishturk is located in island of Ireland
Inishturk
Inishturk
Geography
LocationAtlantic Ocean
Coordinates53°42′05″N 10°06′30″W / 53.7014°N 10.1083°W / 53.7014; -10.1083Coordinates: 53°42′05″N 10°06′30″W / 53.7014°N 10.1083°W / 53.7014; -10.1083
Area12.5 km2 (4.8 sq mi)
Highest elevation189.3 m (621.1 ft)[1]
Administration
ProvinceConnacht
CountyMayo
Demographics
Population58 (2014)
Pop. density4.64 /km2 (12.02 /sq mi)
Ethnic groupsIrish

Inishturk (Inis Toirc in Irish, meaning Wild Boar Island) is an inhabited island of County Mayo, in Ireland.[2]

Geography[edit]

Islands off County Mayo

The island lies about 15 km (9 mi) off the coast; its highest point reaches 189.3 m (621.1 ft) above sea level.[1] Between Inisturk and Clare Island lies Caher Island. It has a permanent population of 58 people.[3] There are two main settlements, both on the more sheltered eastern end of the island, Ballyheer and Garranty. Bellavaun and Craggy are abandoned settlements. The British built a Martello tower on the western coast during the Napoleonic Wars. Inisturk has the highest per capita donation rate towards the RNLI in the whole of Ireland.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Inishturk has been inhabited on and off since 4,000 BCE and has been inhabited permanently since at least 1700.[4] Some of the more recent inhabitants are descended from evacuees from Inishark to the southwest[citation needed]. The social club Mountain Common is situated on the hill that separates the two settlements.

Recent history[edit]

In 1993 Inishturk Community centre was opened, this community centre doubles as a library and a pub.

In June 2014 the ESB commissioned three new Broadcrown BCP 110-50 100kVA diesel generators to supply electricity to the island[5] The ESB have operated a diesel power station on the island since the 1980s[6]

Inishturk gained international attention in 2016 after a number of websites claimed that the island would welcome any American "refugees" fleeing a potential Donald Trump presidency.[7][8][9] These claims were used as one example of the type of "fake news" that arose during the 2016 US presidential election campaign.[10] As of November 2016, no changes to inward migration have been reported.[citation needed]

The island is home to a primary school on the island which in 2011 had only 3 pupils, this believed to be the smallest primary school in Ireland[11]

Demographics[edit]

The table below reports data on Inisturk's population taken from Discover the Islands of Ireland (Alex Ritsema, Collins Press, 1999) and the Census of Ireland.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1841577—    
1851174−69.8%
1861110−36.8%
1871112+1.8%
1881116+3.6%
1891135+16.4%
1901135+0.0%
1911132−2.2%
1926101−23.5%
YearPop.±%
1936107+5.9%
1946125+16.8%
1951123−1.6%
1956110−10.6%
1961108−1.8%
196692−14.8%
197183−9.8%
197985+2.4%
198176−10.6%
YearPop.±%
198690+18.4%
199178−13.3%
199683+6.4%
200272−13.3%
200658−19.4%
201153−8.6%
201651−3.8%
Source: Central Statistics Office. "CNA17: Population by Off Shore Island, Sex and Year". CSO.ie. Retrieved October 12, 2016.

Transport[edit]

Prior to 1997 there was no scheduled ferry service and people traveled to and from the islands using local fishing boats. Since then a ferry service operates from Roonagh Quay, Louisburgh, County Mayo.[12] The pier was constructed during the 1980s by the Irish government, around this time the roads on the island were paved.[13]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]