Irgen Gioro

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Irgen Gioro
Manchu ᡳᡵᡤᡝᠨ ᡤᡳᠣᡵᠣ
Transliteration irgen gioro
Mukūn Musi, Yehe, Jamuhu, Singgan, Sarkū, Hunehe, Yarhū, Ula, Sunggari Ula, Akuri, Fe Ala, Hada, etc.[1]
Notable

Irgen Gioro (Manchu: ᡳᡵᡤᡝᠨ
ᡤᡳᠣᡵᠣ
; Möllendorff: irgen gioro) is a Manchu family name, which was categorized as a "notable clan"(满洲著姓),[5] and member of the eight greatest houses of the Manchu nobility in Manchu Dynasty.[6][7][8][9][10][11] Xibe and Nanai people also has Irgen Gioro as their family name.[12][13]

History[edit]

The origin of Irgen Gioro does not have a decisive conclusion as of now. According to a famous anecdote, the ancestors of Irgen Gioros were the emperors Huizong, Qinzong and other royal family members of the Song dynasty who were captured by the Jurchens in the Jingkang Incident of the Jin–Song wars.[14] At the early period of Manchu Empire, Irgen Gioro were recorded as 340 households with a population of 352 males.[15] They mainly distributed in Musi, Yehe, Jamuhu, Singgan, Sarkū, Hunehe, Yarhū, Girin Ula, Sunggari Ula, Akuri, Fe ala, Hada, etc.[1] The whole clan had many famous hereditary noblemen in the empire, such as Viscount Aljin, Baron Ašan of Musi mukūn[note 1]; Viscount Tulusi, Baron Fiyanggu of Yehe mukūn; Baron Gagai of Sarkū mukūn and so on.[17] Among these noble families, Musi mukūn was considered as the most politically influential one because of their important contribution to the Manchu Empire's establishment.[18] Irgen Gioro clan also had 40 other hereditary peers as captains (Manchu: ᠨᡳᡵᡠ
  ᡳ
ᠵᠠᠩᡤᡳᠨ
; Möllendorff: nirui janggin[19]) in Banner Armies.[20]

There were few instance of name change of the clan (e.g. The Manchu clan of Bayara, Monggero, Donggo, Laibu, Siburu and Jamuhu Gioro came from the Irgen Gioros who settled in these places.) at the early Qing Dynasty because of migration.[21] Due to the adoption of Chinese culture during the mid to late Qing dynasty, most of Irgen Gioros changed their family names to Zhao (赵), a typical Chinese family name, which was according to the Chinese homophone and their anecdote of possible origin.[22][23][24] Other changes of Chinese family names, such as Tong, Gu, Yi, Sa, Gong, Zhao (兆), Cao, Bao, Zhe, Xi, Yu, Ge, Ma, Gao, Hu, Bai, and Chen, are also reported.[25]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ mukūn(ᠮᡠᡴᡡᠨ) is a family branch of a clan[16]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hungjeo 2002, pp. 179, 180, 189, 190, 199, 200, 207, 208, 209
  2. ^ Zhao 1998, pp. 8900, 8901, 8905, 8930
  3. ^ Zhao 1998, pp. 9198, 9249, 9254, 9449, 12618
  4. ^ Zhao 2012, pp. 381–384
  5. ^ Hungjeo 2002, p. 181
  6. ^ Rawski 1998, p. 66
  7. ^ Elliott 2001, p. 398
  8. ^ Chen 1997, pp. 229–230
  9. ^ Xu 1986, pp. 2144–2145
  10. ^ Yang 1933, pp. 1–2
  11. ^ Jooliyan 1980, p. 316
  12. ^ Xibe Language Association of Xinjiang: Brief Introduction of Xibe Family Names (simplified Chinese)
  13. ^ Zhao & Yao 1997, p. 76(Zhuyetie Various Notes)
  14. ^ Zhao 2012, p. 5
  15. ^ Zhao 2012, p. 380
  16. ^ Hu 1994, p. 552
  17. ^ Zhao 2012, pp. 381–383
  18. ^ Du 2008, p. 75
  19. ^ Elliott 2001, p. 59
  20. ^ Zhao 2012, pp. 491–519
  21. ^ Zhao 2012, pp. 372, 373, 383, 384, 385
  22. ^ Jin, Jin & Ulhicun 1996, p. 207
  23. ^ Jin 2009, pp. 118, 126
  24. ^ Zhao 2012, pp. 5, 381
  25. ^ Zhao 2012, p. 381

References[edit]