Daniel in Islam

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Daniel (Arabic: دانيال, Daniyal) is usually considered by Muslims to have been a prophet. Although he is not mentioned in the Qur'an,[1] nor hadith but are taken from Isra'iliyyat reports, which bear his name and which refer to his time spent in the den of the lions.[2] There are debates, however, that go on about Daniel's time of preaching and some Muslims believe that he was not a prophet but a saintly man. Some Muslim records suggest that a book regarding apocalyptic revelations was found in a coffin, which is supposed to have contained the remains of Daniel, which was brought to light at the time of the Muslim conquest of Tustar, and buried again at the request of Umar.[3]

Background[edit]

Muslim tradition has retained some records of the two figures name Daniel in the Hebrew Bible: the first being the sage of ancient times mentioned by Ezekiel[4] and the second being the visionary who lived at the time of the captivity in Babylon, whose life was chronicled in the Book of Daniel, canonized in the current Hebrew Bible. The first figure is referred to as "Daniel the Elder" in Muslim writing, whilst the second figure is referred to as Daniel. Daniel's character in Muslim legend has shaped the figure in a similar way to that of the prophet Idris,[5] as he is considered to have been a revealer of future mysteries, coupled with one who excelled in scientific matters.[6] However, other scholars reject the differentiating and treat both Daniel the Elder and Daniel as one and the same.[7] Also Ibn Tayymiyyah in his book Al Jawaab as Saheeh writes a lot about Daniel writing and foretelling Muhmmad[8]

Daniel in Muslim literature[edit]

Muslim tradition recounts that it was Daniel who preached in Babylon, exhorting the people to return to God. He lived during the reign of Cyrus, and taught this prince the unity of God and the true religion of Islam.[9] Key events from Daniel's life which are recounted in exegesis are the presence of Daniel and his companions in the court of Nebuchadnezzar; Nebuchadnezzar's dreams; the friction between Daniel and his detractors and his miraculous delivery from the den of the lions; and Belshazzar's feast and the deciphering of the mysterious writing.[10] Other events from the Book of Daniel, such as Susanna and the Elders, play no part in tradition.

One legend that is not found in Jewish tradition but appears in Muslim writings is that of Jeremiah meeting Daniel. A similar event involving Habakkuk and Daniel, however, is to be found in Lives of the Prophets.[11] Ibn Abi Al-Dunya narrated the following, based on a chain of citations:

Nebuchadnezzar captured two lions and threw them into a pit. He then brought Daniel and threw him at them; yet they did not pounce at him; rather, he remained as God wished. When then he desired food and drink, God revealed to Jeremiah, who was in Sham: "Prepare food and drink for Daniel." He said: "O Lord I am in Jerusalem while Daniel is in Babylon." God revealed to him: "Do what I have commanded you to do, and I shall send you one who will carry you and what you have prepared." Jeremiah did so and God sent him something that would carry him until he arrived at the brink of the pit. Then Daniel asked: "Who is this?" He answered: "I am Jeremiah." He asked: "What brought you?" He answered: "Your Lord sent me to you." He said: "And so my Lord has remembered me?" He said: "Yes." Daniel said: "Praise be to God Who has never forgotten me! And Praise be to God Who never forgets those who appeal to Him! And Praise be to Him Who compensates good with good, rewards patience with safety, dispels harm after distress, assures us when we are overwhelmed, and is our hope when skill fails us."

Finding and Reburial[edit]

Ibn Katihr records in his book of Al Biddyah Wan Nihya:

It was narrated from Khaalid ibn Dinaar that Abu’l-‘Aaliyah said: When we conquered Tastar, we found in the treasury of al-Hormuzaan a bier on which was the body of a dead man, and by his head was a scripture of his. We took the scripture and took it to ‘Umar, and he summoned Ka‘b, who translated it into Arabic. I was the first man among the Arabs to read it, and I read it as I read this Qur'an.

I said to Abu’l-‘Aaliyah: What was in it? He said: It was about you, your affairs, your religion, your talk, and what will happen after that. I said: What did you do with the man? He said: We dug thirteen different graves during the day, then at night we buried him and we levelled all the graves, so as to conceal its location from the people, so that they would not exhume him. I said: Why would people do that? He said: If rain was withheld from them, they would take his bier out and they would receive rain. I said: Who do you think the man was? He said: A man called Daniyal. I said: How long ago do you think he died? He said: Three hundred years ago. I said: Had anything of him changed? He said: No, except a few hairs at the back of his head, for the earth does not consume (the bodies of) the Prophets, and wild animals cannot devour them.[12] [13]

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A-Z of Prophets in Islam and Judaism, B.M. Wheeler, Daniel
  2. ^ Tabari, Volume I: Prophets and Patriarchs, 647, 652-654
  3. ^ Mukaddasi, 417 (c.f. C. Cahen, in Arabica, 1959, 28)
  4. ^ Ezekiel. xiv: 14, 20 and xxviii: 3
  5. ^ Hughes Dictionary of Islam, T.P. Hughes, Daniel
  6. ^ Malhamat Daniyal
  7. ^ Stories of the Prophets, Ibn Kathir', Daniel
  8. ^ al-Jawaab as-Saheeh (Answering those who altered the religion of Jesus Chirst)pg 367 http://l.b5z.net/i/u/6103974/f/Answering_those_who_altered_the_religion_of_Jesus_Christ.pdf
  9. ^ Tabari, i, 665-668, 717
  10. ^ Mas'udi, Murudj, i: 117, 120; ii: 115 ,128
  11. ^ A-Z of Prophets in Islam and Judaism, Wheeler, Habbakuk
  12. ^ "Who was the Prophet Daniyal (peace be upon him)? - islamqa.info". islamqa.info. Retrieved 2015-11-30. 
  13. ^ al-Bidaayah wa’n-Nihaayah (The Beginning and The End) Volume 2 page 40