Jellyfish galaxy

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Ram pressure stripping of gas from a galaxy in ESO 137-001.

A jellyfish galaxy is a type of galaxy found in galaxy clusters. They are characterised by ram pressure stripping of gas from the affected galaxy by the intracluster medium, triggering starbursts along a tail of gas.[1]

Jellyfish galaxies have been seen in a number of galaxy clusters including Abell 2125 (redshift z=0.20; ACO 2125 C153);[2][1] Abell 2667 (z=0.23; G234144−260358);[2][1] Abell 2744 (z=0.31; ACO 2744 Central Jellyfish;[3] HLS001427–30234/ACO 2744 F0083;[2][1][3][4] GLX001426–30241 / ACO 2744 F0237 / ACO 2733 CN104;[3][4] MIP001417–302303 / ACO 2744 F1228;[3][4] HLS001428–302334;[4] GLX001354–302212[4] ).

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Harald Ebeling; Lauren N. Stephenson; Alastair C. Edge (1 November 2013). "Jellyfish: Evidence of Extreme Ram-pressure Stripping in Massive Galaxy Clusters". The Astrophysical Journal Letters (published 15 January 2014). 781 (2). arXiv:1312.6135Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014ApJ...781L..40E. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/781/2/L40. L40. 
  2. ^ a b c Bob Yirka (30 January 2014). "Hubble images spawn theory of how spiral galaxies turn into jellyfish before becoming elliptical". phys.org. 
  3. ^ a b c d Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W. (13 December 2011). "Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744". The Astrophysical Journal Letters (published 16 April 2012). 750 (1). arXiv:1204.1052Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012ApJ...750L..23O. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/750/1/L23. L23. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Rawle, T. D.; Altieri, B.; Egami, E.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Richard, J.; Santos, J. S.; Valtchanov, I.; Walth, G.; Bouy, H.; Haines, C. P.; Okabe, N. (4 March 2014). "Star formation in the massive cluster merger Abell 2744". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (published 4 June 2014). 442 (1): 196–206. arXiv:1405.1046Freely accessible. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.442..196R. doi:10.1093/mnras/stu868. 
  5. ^ "Supermassive Black Holes Feed on Cosmic Jellyfish - ESO's MUSE instrument on the VLT discovers new way to fuel black holes". www.eso.org. Retrieved 17 August 2017.