KSZL

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
KSZL
CityBarstow, California
Broadcast areaVictorville, California
BrandingHot Talk AM 1230
Frequency1230 kHz
First air date1947
FormatNews/talk
Power1,000 watts unlimited
ClassC
Facility ID21496
Transmitter coordinates34°54′44.00″N 117°01′39.00″W / 34.9122222°N 117.0275000°W / 34.9122222; -117.0275000
Former callsignsKWTC (1947-1983)
KPRD (1983-1986)
OwnerCalifornia Communications of Barstow, LLC
(Dos Costas Communications Corporation)
Sister stationsKDUC, KDUQ, KXXZ

KSZL (1230 AM) is a commercial radio station that is licensed to and serves Barstow, California, United States. The station is owned by California Communications of Barstow, LLC and broadcasts a news/talk format.

History[edit]

The station first signed on in 1947 as KWTC. Originally owned by William T. Brown, Burton C. Boatwright, and Robert E. Reno — doing business as Mojave Valley Broadcasting Company — it broadcast at a power of 250 watts at all hours.[1][2] In June 1950, KWTC joined the Liberty Broadcasting System, an early radio network that carried live re-creations of Major League Baseball games.[3] In 1959, KWTC applied to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase its power to 1,000 watts during the day; the FCC approved the adjustment in 1961.[4][5]

In late 1980, Mojave Valley Broadcasting sold KWTC and its sister station KWTC-FM (93.5 FM) to Inland Empire Broadcasters — headed by Howard N. Fisher, owner of KPRO in Riverside, California — for $385,000.[6] The new owner changed the station's call sign to KPRD in March 1983.[7] In September 1985, Inland Empire Broadcasters sold KPRD and its FM counterpart, now called KZNS, to First American Communications Corporation for $300,000.[8] The following April, the station adopted the KSZL call letters.[9]

In December 1998, First American sold KSZL and FM sister stations KDUC and KDUQ to Pleasant Gap, Pennsylvania-based Tele-Media Broadcasting LLC for $875,000.[10]

In June 2008, Dos Costas Communications Corporation sold KSZL, KDUC, KDUQ, and KXXZ to California Communications of Barstow, LLC for $4.3 million.[11][12]

KSZL previously aired programming from Air America before that network's demise in January 2010.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directory of AM, FM, and TV Stations of the United States" (PDF). Broadcasting 1950 Yearbook Number. Broadcasting Publications Inc. 1950. p. 78. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  2. ^ "FCC Actions" (PDF). Broadcasting/Telecasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. April 11, 1949. p. 185. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  3. ^ "Front Office" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. June 26, 1950. p. 40. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  4. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. October 26, 1959. p. 119. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  5. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. March 27, 1961. p. 108. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  6. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. December 1, 1980. p. 110. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  7. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. March 21, 1983. p. 182. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  8. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. September 23, 1985. p. 68. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  9. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. April 14, 1986. p. 184. Retrieved January 7, 2019.
  10. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting and Cable. R.R. Bowker. December 14, 1998. p. 69. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  11. ^ "Victor Valley, CA Cluster Changes Hands". AllAccess.com. All Access Music Group. June 25, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  12. ^ "BAS Spins Two From Ohio Deal". AllAccess.com. All Access Music Group. July 2, 2008. Retrieved January 6, 2019.

External links[edit]