Bethel Broadcasting, Incorporated

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KYUK (AM)
KYUK 640-91.9 logo.jpg
City Bethel, Alaska
Broadcast area Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta (Southwestern Alaska)
Frequency 640 kHz
Translator(s) 91.9 K220EA Aniak, Alaska
First air date May 13, 1971 (1971-05-13)[1]
Format Public radio, music
Language(s) English, Yupik languages[2]
Power 10,000 watts
Class A (former NARBA I-N)
Facility ID 4963
Transmitter coordinates 60°46′54.3″N 161°53′8.3″W / 60.781750°N 161.885639°W / 60.781750; -161.885639Coordinates: 60°46′54.3″N 161°53′8.3″W / 60.781750°N 161.885639°W / 60.781750; -161.885639 (NAD83)
Former frequencies 580 kHz[3]
Affiliations National Public Radio
Public Radio International
Native Voice Communications
American Indian Radio on Satellite
Alaska Public Radio
Owner Bethel Broadcasting, Inc.
Sister stations KYUK-FM, KYUK-TV (defunct)
Website www.kyuk.org/radio.html
KYUK-FM
City Bethel, Alaska
Broadcast area Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta (southwestern Alaska)
Frequency 90.3 MHz
First air date December 2009 (2009-12)
Format Freeform
Language(s) English
Power 385 watts
HAAT 23 meters (75 ft)
Class A
Facility ID 172683
Transmitter coordinates 60°47′30.3″N 161°46′30.3″W / 60.791750°N 161.775083°W / 60.791750; -161.775083 (NAD83)
Owner Bethel Broadcasting, Inc.
Sister stations KYUK (AM), KYUK-TV (defunct)
Website www.kyuk.org/radio.html

Bethel Broadcasting, Incorporated, doing business as KYUK (AM), KYUK-FM, and KYUK-TV is a non-profit corporation dedicated to serving the Yup'ik Eskimo and residents of populations of southwest Alaska with local, non-commercial public radio and television. KYUK is a National Public Radio and Alaska Public Radio affiliate and PBS member station through the Alaska One Public Television Network. KYUK is located in Bethel, Alaska a town situated on the banks of the Kuskokwim River within the Yukon/Kuskokwim Delta region of southwestern Alaska.

KYUK has maintained an archive of their programs and productions. The Archive has over 5,000 audio and video recordings from the mid-1970s to the present. The mission of the Archive is to preserve, organize, store and make accessible moving image and sound recordings produced by KYUK Television and Radio about the culture, language, history and contemporary life of Yup'ik people and residents of the region.

The contents of the Archive include local news footage, newscasts, long form documentaries and documentary production elements, instructional public affairs, feature magazine shows, and Yup'ik dance performance programs. Many programs were produced in both English and Yup'ik languages.

KYUK (AM)[edit]

KYUK (AM) is an AM public radio clear-channel station. It is licensed for 10 kilowatts on 640 kHz (640 AM). It primarily features programming from National Public Radio and Native Voice One. The latter network occasionally airs a pair of network identification spots which originated from the station, featuring former news reporters Charles Enoch and Julia Jimmie. In these clips, Enoch and Jimmie reference nearby Tuntutuliak (the hometown of both), the station and its location on the Kuskokwim River.

KYUK (AM) claims to have been the first Native-owned and operated radio station in the United States when it first went on the air in 1971.[1]

A construction permit for a 1000-watt FM rebroadcaster of KYUK (AM) on 91.1 MHz at Marshall, Alaska was issued by the FCC on 27 December 2007.[needs update][2]

KYUK-FM[edit]

KYUK-FM is an FM public radio station broadcasting at 90.3 MHz. It plays music with different genres at different times of day. It went on the air in Bethel in December 2009.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Radio". Bethel, Alaska: Bethel Broadcasting. 2010-02-26. Retrieved 2010-05-19. 
  2. ^ a b "FM Query Results - Facility ID No.: 172686". Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved 2010-05-19.  Yupik languages claim is in the application BNPED-20071019AOA (Form 340), exhibits 2 and 13.
  3. ^ Mitchell, Elaine, ed. (1975). Alaska Blue Book (Second ed.). Juneau: Alaska Department of Education, Division of State Libraries. p. 157. 

External links[edit]