List of supernova remnants

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This is a list of observed supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way, as well as galaxies nearby enough to resolve individual nebulae, such as the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy.

Supernova remnants typically only survive for a few tens of thousands of years, making all known SNRs fairly young compared to many other astronomical objects.

Image Name Right ascension Declination First visible
from Earth
Peak
magnitude
Distance (ly) Type Remnant
Chandra image of Sgr A.jpg Sagittarius A East 17h 45m 41s −29° 00′ 48″ 100,000−35,000
years ago
? 26,000 tidal disruption ?
Simeis 147.jpg Simeis 147 or
Spaghetti Nebula
05h 39m +27° 50′ ~40,000 years ago 6.5 3,000 ? neutron star
PSR J0538+2817
IC443.jpeg IC 443 also known as jellyfish nebulae 06h 18m 02.7s +22° 39′ 36″ ~30,000 years ago ? 3,000 II neutron star
CXOU J061705.3+222127
SNR G132.6+01.5 02h 17m 40s +62° 45′ 00″ 33,000-27,000 years ago ? 7,200 ? ?
W50 medium.jpg W50 or
Manatee Nebula
19h 12m 20s +04° 55′ 00″ ~20,000 years ago ? 18,000 ? black hole/neutron star
SS 433
425991main W44 multi.jpg W44 18h 56m 10.65s +01° 13′ 21.3″ 20,000-16,000
years ago
? 10,400 ? neutron star
PSR B1853+01
Vela Supernova Remnant by Harel Boren (155256626).jpg Vela SNR 08h 34m −45° 50′ 10,300−9,000 BCE 12 815±98 II neutron star
Vela Pulsar
Kesteven 79.jpg Kesteven 79 18h 52m 29s +00° 38′ 42″ 8600–7000 BCE ? 23,000 ? neutron star
PSR J1852+0040
Ultraviolet image of the Cygnus Loop Nebula crop.jpg
Revisiting the Veil Nebula.jpg
Cygnus Loop,
including Veil Nebula
20h 51m +30° 40′ 6,000−3,000 BCE 7 1,470 ? possible neutron star
2XMM J204920.2+290106
3C58- A supernova remnant 10,000 light years from Earth. (2941477840).jpg 3C 58
(possibly SN 1181)
02h 05m 37.0s +64° 49′ 42″ ~4,000 BCE
(August 4, 1181?)
−1? 8,000 ? neutron star
3C 58
Sig06-030.jpg LMC N49 05h 26m 00.4s −66° 05′ 02″ ~3,000 BCE ? 160,000 ? neutron star
PSR B0525-66
G299-Remnants-SuperNova-Type1a-20150218.jpg G299.2-2.9[1] 12h 15m 13s −65° 30′ 00″ ~2,500 BCE ? 16,000 Ias none
Puppis A Chandra + ROSAT.jpg Puppis A 08h 24m 07s −42° 59′ 50″ ~1,700 BCE ? 7,000 ? neutron star
RX J0822−4300
G332.4+00.1 16h 15m 20s −50° 42′ 00″ ~1,000 BCE ? 16,800 ? neutron star
PSR J1614-5048
PIA22569-SuperNovaRemnant-G54.1+0.3-20181116.jpg G54.1+0.3[2] 19h 30m 30s +18° 52′ 14″ ~900 BCE ? 22,000 ? neutron star
PSR J1930+1852
Chandra SNR G292.0+1.8.png G292.0+01.8 11h 24m 59s −59° 19′ 10″ ~800-400 BCE ? 17,600 ? neutron star
PSR J1124-5916
Kesteven 75 18h 46m 25.5s −02° 59′ 14″ 1st millennium BCE ? 18,900 ? neutron star
PSR J1846-0258
G306.3-0.9.jpg G306.3-0.9[3] 13h 21m 50.9s −63° 33′ 50″ ~400 BCE ? 26,000 Ia none
RCW103.tif RCW 103 16h 17m 33s −51° 02′ 00″ 1st century ? 10,000 II neutron star
1E 161348-5055
RCW 86.jpg SN 185 14h 43m 00s −62° 30′ 00″ December 7, 185 ? 8,200 Ia none
CTB 37B
(possibly SN 393)
17h 13m 43.0s −38° 10′ 12″ ~500 CE
(April 393?)
? 43,000 ? neutron star
CXOU J171405.7-381031
E0102 01h 04m 01s −72° 01′ 52″ 1st millennium ? 190,000 ? neutron star
SNR 0540-69.3 05h 40m 10.8s −69° 19′ 54.2″ 350-1250 CE ? 160,000 ? neutron star
PSR J0540−6919
Supernova Remnant W49B in x-ray, radio, and infrared.jpg W49B 19h 11m 09s +09° 06′ 24″ About 1000 CE ? 26,000 Ib or Ic unidentified black hole
SN 1006.jpg SN 1006 15h 02m 22.1s −42° 05′ 49″ May 1, 1006 −7.5 7,200 Ia[4] none
G350.1-0.3 (NASA).jpg G350.1-0.3 17h 21m 06s −37° 26′ 50″ 1000-1100 ? 15,000 ? neutron star
XMMU J172054.5-372652
Crab Nebula.jpg SN 1054 or M1 or
Crab Nebula
05h 34m 31.94s +22° 00′ 52.2″ July 4, 1054 −6 6,300 II neutron star
Crab Pulsar
Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2.jpg RX J0852.0-4622 or
Vela Junior
08h 52m 00s −46° 20′ 00″ circa 1250 ? 700 ? neutron star
CXOU J085201.4–461753
SGR 1806-20 18h 08m 39.32s −20° 24′ 40.1″ 1050-1650 ? 42,000 ? neutron star
SGR 1806-20
Tycho-supernova-xray.jpg SN 1572 or
Tycho's Nova
00h 25m 21.5s +64° 08′ 27″ November 11, 1572 −4 7,500 Ia[4] none
Keplers supernova.jpg SN 1604 or
Kepler's Nova
17h 30m 35.98s −21° 28′ 56.2″ October 8, 1604 −2.5 20,000 Ia none
Cassiopeia A Spitzer Crop.jpg Cassiopeia A 23h 23m 24s +58° 48′ 54″ circa 1667 6 10,000 IIb[5] neutron star
CXOU J232327.8+584842
SN 1885A or
S Andromedae
00h 42m 43.12s +41° 16′ 03.2″ August 20, 1885 6 2,500,000 I pec none
G19 xray.tif G1.9+0.3 17h 48m 46.1s −27° 09′ 50.9″ circa 1898 ? 25,000 Ia none
Supernova-1987a.jpg SN 1987A 05h 35m 28.02s −69° 16′ 11.1″ February 24, 1987 3 168,000 II-P neutron star

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chandra X-Ray Observatory (2015-02-12). "G299.2-2.9: Exploded Star Blooms Like a Cosmic Flower". Retrieved 2015-10-15.
  2. ^ J. Rho et al. (2017), "A Dust Twin of Cas A: Cool Dust and 21-micron Silicate Dust Feature in the Supernova Remnant G54.1+0.3", MNRAS doi:10.1093/mnras/sty1713
  3. ^ Francis, Reddy. "NASA's Swift, Chandra Explore a Youthful 'Star Wreck'". NASA. Retrieved 2013-03-21.
  4. ^ a b Schaefer, B. E. (2004). Höflich, Peter; Kumar, Pawan; Wheeler, J. Craig (eds.). Cosmic explosions in three dimensions : asymmetries in supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. Cambridge Contemporary Astrophysics. p. 383. ISBN 0-521-84286-7.. Supernovae types discussed in contributed article "Types for the galactic supernovae" by B.E. Schaefer, pp. 81–84.
  5. ^ Krause, O.; Birkmann, S.; Usuda, T.; Hattori, T.; Goto, M.; Rieke, G.; Misselt, K. (2008). "The Cassiopeia A supernova was of type IIb". Science. 320 (5880): 1195–1197. arXiv:0805.4557. Bibcode:2008Sci...320.1195K. doi:10.1126/science.1155788. PMID 18511684.

External links[edit]