Need for Speed: High Stakes

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Need for Speed: High Stakes
NFS High Stakes box.jpg
Cover art featuring a Porsche 911 Turbo and a Ferrari 550 Maranello
Developer(s)EA Canada (PS)
EA Seattle (PC)
Publisher(s)Electronic Arts
Producer(s)Hanno Lemke
Programmer(s)Daniel Teh (PS1)
Sam Deasy (PC)
Composer(s)Rom Di Prisco
Saki Kaskas
Crispin Hands
SeriesNeed for Speed
Platform(s)PlayStation, Microsoft Windows
ReleasePlayStation
  • NA: March 24, 1999[1]
  • EU: March 1999
Windows
Genre(s)Racing
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Need for Speed: High Stakes, known as Need for Speed: Road Challenge in Europe and South America, is a 1999 racing video game released by Electronic Arts for the PlayStation and Microsoft Windows. It is the fourth installment in the Need For Speed series.

Gameplay[edit]

The career system of this entry consists of two modes: "Tournament", straightforward series of races with certain cars; and "Special Event", similar to Tournament, but with various conditions such as with night driving or with a fully upgraded car. Completing races earns the player credits which are used to buy new cars for new events and to upgrade old cars to make events a little easier. Completing races also unlocks the tracks for single race purposes, and completing Tournament events unlocks the Special Event events. Beating all events of Tournament or Special Events will unlock one of two secret cars to purchase; the player also gets a free sample at the same time.

The PC version is somewhat different, starting with having everything under a clear "Career Mode". All events are split into "tiers", a selection of 1 to 5 individual competitions. Usually, one of those competitions is a "High Stakes" race, where the player bets their current car.

In High Stakes, two racers bet their cars on a duel; the winner of the race keeps their car and gains the loser's. The player or players must own more than one car to participate in a High Stakes race.

In addition to the "Classic" mode, which plays similarly to the previous Hot Pursuit, High Stakes introduces "Getaway" and "Time Trap" modes. In Getaway, the speeder must evade the police or the police must catch the speeder within the time limit. If the speeder has not been arrested when time is up, the player has the option to quit to the Race Results menu or to continue play for as long as possible. In Time Trap, the speeder must complete a race or the police must arrest all racers (ten in the PS version) within the time limit. The police can set up spike strips and road blocks, and even call for backup.

Development[edit]

The game was announced for Microsoft Windows on April 23, 1999.[3]

Reception[edit]

The PlayStation version of Need for Speed: High Stakes received "favorable" reviews according to the review aggregation website Metacritic.[6] An unnamed reviewer of Next Generation's June 1999 issue said that the same PlayStation version "has taken the impressive gains of Hot Pursuit and added more than enough new features and modes to attract series fans and newcomers alike. If you like fast cars – or just running from the cops – you'll love this game."[22] Three issues later, Buck DeFore of the same magazine (now labeled as NextGen) said of the PC version, "Greater than the sum of its parts, High Stakes has fun where it counts – in spades."[21] In Japan, where the former version was ported and published by Electronic Arts Victor under the name Over Drivin' IV (オーバードライビンIV, Ōbā Doraibin IV) on June 17, 1999, Famitsu gave it a score of 30 out of 40.[11] In the UK, Steve Merrett of Official UK PlayStation Magazine gave the same version eight out of ten.[27] However, Merrett also said that (like its previous installment) it could not compete with other racing titles such as Gran Turismo and R4: Ridge Racer Type 4.[27]

Neil Mouneimne of Computer Games Strategy Plus gave the PC version four stars out of five, saying, "Combine the variety of gameplay modes, slick presentation, and challenging AI and what you have is the most polished example of showroom racing yet."[28] Glenn Wigmore of AllGame gave the same PC version three-and-a-half stars out of five, calling it "a great follow up to the earlier games in the Need for Speed series, as it has many new cars and features for you to try out. Also with the 3D card and internet support, this game is a winner."[29] However, The Jaded Critic gave the PlayStation version three out of five, calling it "a playable and entertaining racer with problems. It seems almost threadbare in places due to the lack of attention in the physics, design, and multi-player aspects. Casual racing fans will probably get a kick out of it, but the hardcore gamers will be left wanting more."[30]

In the German market, the PlayStation version received a "Gold" award from the Verband der Unterhaltungssoftware Deutschland (VUD) by the end of July 1999,[31] indicating sales of at least 100,000 units across Germany, Austria and Switzerland.[32]

The PC version was named the best racing game of 1999 by CNET Gamecenter,[33] and by Computer Gaming World.[34] It was a runner-up for Computer Games Strategy Plus' prize in this category, which ultimately went to Dirt Track Racing. The staff wrote, "Graphically, it has few peers. And the High Stakes mode really made it more than just another pretty face."[35] The game was also a nominee for GameSpot's "Driving Game of the Year" Award, which went to NASCAR Racing 3;[36] and for PC PowerPlay's "Best Driving/Racing" award, which went to Grand Theft Auto 2.[37]

References[edit]

  1. ^ GameSpot staff (March 24, 1999). "High Stakes Burns Retail Rubber [date mislabeled as "April 27, 2000"]". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 5, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  2. ^ IGN staff (June 17, 1999). "News Briefs". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  3. ^ "Electronic Arts in Development of Need for Speed: High Stakes for the PC". Business Wire. April 23, 1999. Archived from the original on May 8, 1999. Retrieved July 18, 2021 – via yahoo.com.
  4. ^ "Need for Speed: High Stakes for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  5. ^ "Need for Speed: High Stakes for PlayStation". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  6. ^ a b "Need for Speed: High Stakes for PlayStation Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  7. ^ Goble, Gordon (July 8, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PC)". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on August 16, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  8. ^ Pacchiano, Ron (April 27, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS)". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on August 16, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  9. ^ Fortune, Greg (October 1999). "Auto Eroticism (Need for Speed: High Stakes Review)" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 183. Ziff Davis. p. 143. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  10. ^ EGM staff (May 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS)". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 118. Ziff Davis.
  11. ^ a b "プレイステーション – オーバードライビンIV". Famitsu (in Japanese). Vol. 915. Enterbrain. June 30, 2006. p. 20. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  12. ^ McNamara, Andy; Anderson, Paul; Reiner, Andrew (May 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS)". Game Informer. No. 73. FuncoLand. Archived from the original on May 20, 2000. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  13. ^ "REVIEW for Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS)". GameFan. Shinno Media. March 29, 1999.
  14. ^ Chick, Tom (July 31, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes Review for PC on GamePro.com". GamePro. IDG Entertainment. Archived from the original on August 11, 2004. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  15. ^ Air Hendrix (May 1999). "Need for Speed High Stakes Review for PlayStation on GamePro.com". GamePro. No. 128. IDG Entertainment. Archived from the original on February 13, 2005. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  16. ^ Johnson, Sean (April 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes Review (PS)". GameRevolution. CraveOnline. Archived from the original on October 2, 2015. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  17. ^ Chin, Elliott (July 9, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes Review (PC)". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 8, 2004. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  18. ^ Gerstmann, Jeff (March 31, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes Review (PS)". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 9, 2004. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  19. ^ Lopez, Vincent (June 29, 1999). "Need for Speed 4: High Stakes [sic]". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  20. ^ Perry, Douglass C. (March 24, 1999). "Need for Speed 4: High Stakes [sic] (PS)". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  21. ^ a b DeFore, Buck (September 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PC)". NextGen. No. 57. Imagine Media. p. 93. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  22. ^ a b "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS)". Next Generation. No. 54. Imagine Media. June 1999. p. 91. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  23. ^ Kujawa, Kraig (May 1999). "NFS: High Stakes". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. Vol. 2 no. 8. Ziff Davis. p. 82. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  24. ^ D'Aprile, Jason (August 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes". PC Accelerator. No. 12. Imagine Media. p. 84. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  25. ^ Mahood, Andy (September 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes". PC Gamer. Vol. 6 no. 9. Imagine Media. Archived from the original on March 15, 2006. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  26. ^ Bottorff, James (1999). "High Stakes passes with flying colors (PS)". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. Archived from the original on October 1, 2007. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  27. ^ a b Merrett, Steve (June 1999). "Need for Speed: Road Challenge". Official UK PlayStation Magazine. No. 46. Future Publishing. pp. 80–81. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  28. ^ Mouneimne, Neil (July 14, 1999). "Need for Speed: High Stakes". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on July 9, 2003. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  29. ^ Wigmore, Glenn. "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PC) – Review". AllGame. All Media Network. Archived from the original on November 14, 2014. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  30. ^ The Jaded Critic. "Need for Speed: High Stakes (PS) – Review". AllGame. All Media Network. Archived from the original on November 14, 2014. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  31. ^ "VUD – Sales-Awards Juli '99". Verband der Unterhaltungssoftware Deutschland (in German). Paderborn. August 12, 1999. Archived from the original on June 23, 2000. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  32. ^ Horn, Andre (January 14, 2004). "VUD-Gold-Awards 2003". GamePro Germany (in German). Archived from the original on July 18, 2018.
  33. ^ Gamecenter staff (January 21, 2000). "The Gamecenter Awards for 1999! (Racing Winner)". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on June 5, 2000. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  34. ^ CGW staff (March 2000). "The 2000 Premier Awards (Racing Game of the Year)" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 188. Ziff Davis. p. 81. Retrieved May 20, 2021.
  35. ^ CGSP staff (March 6, 2000). "The Computer Games Awards (Racing Game of the Year)". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on April 1, 2005. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  36. ^ GameSpot staff. "The Best & Worst of 1999 (Driving Game of the Year, Nominees)". GameSpot. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on August 16, 2000. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  37. ^ "Game of the Year 1999 (Part 3)". PC PowerPlay. No. 47. Next Media Pty Ltd. April 2000. p. 30. Retrieved June 18, 2021.

External links[edit]