Onitsha-Ado

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Onitsha-Ado is the small, original village that was later incorporated and formed the city of Onitsha, on the east bank of the river Niger in eastern Nigeria, in the area currently called the Anambra state of Nigeria. The Onitsha-Ado were originally Igbo people who migrated from the Igbo hinterland, in around 1100 AD crossed to the western bank of the river Niger, and moved into the deeper interior of what is now known as western Nigeria. They later settled on the east bank of the river Niger after migrating back from Benin (or the present western Nigeria),

The people forming the Onitsha-Ado (originally called 'Onicha-Udo' but corrupted by the British colonial masters to 'Onitsha-Ado') were perhaps originally Aro people from Arochukwu, Ohafia, Bende, Afikpo, Okigwe, and other parts of Igboland.

Today, the people of Agbor speak a dialect exactly like that of the present day Afikpo and Owerri people, showing that these may be descendants of the contingents from the areas in the Igbo hinterland.

These show very ancient civilization in the Igbo areas. although the made impossible the republican system that is also associated with the Igbo civilization. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] For instance the Igbanke people are Igbos; Ika and Anioma people are Igbos. The Igbo speaking people of Benue and Kogi state are some of these Igbos who migrated from the bank of the river Niger or the areas around Nri, IgboUkwu, Awka, Orlu Owerri, Afikpo, and environs. The genocidal agenda of Yakubu Jack Gowon and his administration's use of the military, police, paramedicals and all the law enforcement agents to massacre defenceless Igbo men, women and children in cold blood during the crisis of 1966 and the civil war and the genocidal killing of Murtalla Muhammed at Asaba and northern Nigeria and Western Nigeria including the Midwest made all the pockets of Igbo communities and Igbo indegines fabricate nonsense. Therefore the present migratory life of the Igbo did not start after the coming of the Europeans but predated it. . Ukwuani people are Igbos from Nsukka and still speak pure Nsukka today. [6] [7] [8] [9] [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ikime O. Ground work of Nigerian history, Ibadan; Heinemann educational books, 1980.
  2. ^ Onwuejeogwu MA. Igbo civilization: Nri kingdom and hegemony; London, Ethnographica, 1981
  3. ^ Roth RL. Great Benin. Its customs, arts and horrors. Northbrook, Illinois, USA, Metro books Inc, 1972
  4. ^ Uchendu VC. The Igbo of south-eastern Nigeria. New York, USA, Holt, Rinehart and Winston Inc, 1965.
  5. ^ Okonjo IM. British administration in Nigeria 1900-1950-A Nigerian view. New York, Nok Publishers LTD,1974.
  6. ^ Ikime O. Ground work of Nigerian history, Ibadan; Heinemann educational books, 1980.
  7. ^ Onwuejeogwu MA. Igbo civilization: Nri kingdom and hegemony; London, Ethnographica, 1981
  8. ^ Roth RL. Great Benin. Its customs, arts and horrors. Northbrook, Illinois, USA, Metro books Inc, 1972
  9. ^ Umeh JA. Igbo people-their origin and culture area. Enugu, Nigeria; Gostak printing and publishing Co.Ltd, 1999
  10. ^ Crowder M. West Africa under colonial rule. London; Hutchinson and Company (publishers) limited, 1976