Pop Life (Prince song)

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"Pop Life"
US 7" single
Single by Prince and The Revolution
from the album Around the World in a Day
B-side "Hello" (U.S.)
"Girl" (UK)
Released July 10, 1985
Format 7" single
12" single
Recorded Sunset Sound, February 19, 1984
Genre R&B, pop, new wave
Length 7"/album: 3:42
US 12" single: 6:16
UK 12" single: 9:05
Label Paisley Park
Writer(s) Prince
Producer(s) Prince
Prince and The Revolution singles chronology
"Raspberry Beret"
(1985)
"Pop Life"
(1985)
"America"
(1985)
Prince (UK) chronology
"Raspberry Beret"
(1985)
"Pop Life"
(1985)
"Kiss"
(1986)

"Pop Life" is a song by Prince and The Revolution. It was the second US (and final UK) single from their 1985 album, Around the World in a Day, reaching number 7 in the US charts. The song starts with a faded-in synth line and quickly starts the main tune. The easy groove is achieved with a smooth bass guitar and piano embellishments. A drum machine provides handclaps to make the song danceable. "Pop Life" was recorded before Purple Rain was completed, indicating the new direction Prince wanted to take after the success of that album and film. Drums on the song were played by Sheila E., and Wendy & Lisa provide backing vocals. The rest of the song was performed by Prince.

The song includes a part that features the sound of bell ringing for a boxing match. After that, there's the sound of a restless crowd with someone yelling "throw the bum out!" This was from an actual concert in 1981 when Prince opened for The Rolling Stones in Los Angeles. Relatively unknown at the time, the crowd booed him off stage. He returned for the second show, getting a better reception, but still some booing. He quit the tour shortly after.

Unlike most Prince hits, no music video was produced for this song.

The song was released in two extended versions. The UK 12" single version is a 9-minute extension of the tune, and ends with a similar synth sound as the beginning. The US received a "Fresh Dance Mix", which is a remix (by Sheila E.) that included some portions of the longer UK version. It clocks in at 6:16, and was included on the 2006 compilation album, Ultimate.

The US B-side of the track was "Hello", written quickly as a response to those who criticized Prince's lack of participation in the "We Are the World" event. The angry lyrics lambaste the prying media and false friendships, and is driven by a pulsing beat. The extended version of the song ends with a spoken word by Prince, which contain some self-humor about his high-heeled shoes. The UK B-side was "Girl", which the US had as the B-side of "America".

The song became a top 10 hit in the US, becoming Prince's eighth top 10 hit in a two year span.

Elvis Costello once planned to do a cover version of the song, with altered lyrics, but Prince refused. Costello later recorded the song "The Bridge I Burned", which borrows the chord sequence from "Pop Life".[1] Alternative rock band Local H recorded a cover of the song, but it has since gone unreleased.[2]

Sampling[edit]

  • The first artist to sample "Pop Life" was Black, Rock and Ron with their song "Rap Life" from their 1989 release Stop the World.
  • Big Daddy Kane sampled this tune in his 1991 single "The Lover in You".
  • G-Unit used elements from "Pop Life" for the song "Coke Life" for their mixtape "Sabrina's Baby Boy (G-Unit Radio Part 25)".
  • 2Pac sampled "Pop Life" on the unreleased song "Pac's Life", a remix of which was later released with a complete different beat in 2006 on Pac's Life.
  • Ja Rule sampled it for his song "Thug Life". It was originally planned to be on his album The Last Temptation, but did not make it due to Prince's disapproval.
  • Life Without Buildings recorded a cover of the song for the 2001 various artists compilation Homesleep Home2 - Cover Songs.
  • Neon Indian recorded a tribute cover for Pitchfork Media in 2016.

Charts[edit]

Chart (1985) Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[3] 67
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[4] 34
Germany (Official German Charts)[5] 65
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[6] 44
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[7] 60
US Billboard Hot 100[8] 7
Chart (2016) Peak
position
France (SNEP)[9] 116

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.elviscostello.info/biography.php
  2. ^ "Indie Press – Scott Lucas Interview". Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  3. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. p. 239. ISBN 0-646-11917-6. 
  4. ^ "Ultratop.be – Prince & The Revolution – Pop Life" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  5. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de – Prince & The Revolution – Pop Life". GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  6. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Prince & The Revolution – Pop Life". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  7. ^ "Prince: Artist Chart History" Official Charts Company. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  8. ^ "Prince – Chart history" Billboard Hot 100 for Prince. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "Lescharts.com – Prince & The Revolution – Pop Life" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved May 9, 2016.

External links[edit]