Primera División (women)

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Primera División
Liga Iberdrola.png
Founded 1988
Country Spain
Confederation UEFA
Number of teams 16
Level on pyramid 1
Relegation to Segunda División
Domestic cup(s) Copa de la Reina
International cup(s) UEFA Champions League
Current champions Atlético Madrid (2nd title)
(2016–17)
Most championships Athletic Bilbao (5 titles)
TV partners BeIN Sports (Spain)
Esport3
ETB 1
Gol T
Website Website
2017–18 season

The Primera División de la Liga de Fútbol Femenino, formerly Superliga Femenina, and known for reasons of sponsorship as Liga Femenina Iberdrola is the highest level of league competition for Spanish women's football. It is the women's equivalent of the men's Primera División and is run by the Real Federación Española de Fútbol. It was founded in 1988 and since then it has been celebrated without interruptions although it has undergone several changes of format and denomination.

It is considered one of the most important leagues at European level according to the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), the top soccer manager at continental level, being the sixth competition with the best coefficient.

Throughout its history twelve clubs have been champions, being the Athletic Club the most awarded team with five championships.

History[edit]

Liga Nacional[edit]

The league was founded in 1988 as Liga Nacional , formed by Olímpico Fortuna, Puente Castro, Parque Alcobendas, Santa María Atlético, Vallès Occidental, RCD Español, FC Barcelona, CE Sabadell y Peña Barcelonista. From the season 1996-97 the league was divided in 4 groups. In that time, all group winners played a semi-final and a final to decide the champion.

Superliga[edit]

Old logo of the league.

For the 2001–02 season the league was renamed to Superliga and the competition system was changed to from the groups format to a double round-robin, thus each team playing the other teams twice, one time away, one time at home. The league consisted of 14 teams in those years. The 2008–09 season kept the double round-robin format but the league was increased from 14 to 16 teams.

In the 2009–10 season the Superliga was increased from 16 to 24 teams, which caused criticism by teams and players, fearing a decline in the quality of competition. The Superliga again is divided in 3 groups of 7 to 8 teams each.[1] Those groups are divided based on local aspects. In the first stage of the season, in all groups each team plays each other twice. After that, the second stage starts. The best two of each group as well as the two best third-place finishers go into group A, the other teams are divided into group B and C based oin a predefined key. Again a double round-robin is played in the groups. All Group A teams and the three best finishers of Group B and C qualify for the Copa de la Reina, and the two best teams in Group A play each other in a two legged final for the season's championship. Rayo Vallecano won the 2009-10 and 2010-11 finals, both times against RCD Espanyol. In the 2009–10 season, two teams had to withdraw from the league for financial reasons.

Primera División[edit]

For the 2011–12 season, in addition to the rename of the league to Primera División, the group based system was eliminated and 18 teams played double round-robin to decide the champion. In the 2012–13 season it was again shortened to 16 teams. Before the 2016–17, the Royal Spanish Football Federation agreed a sponsorship with Iberdrola, renaming the league as Liga Iberdrola for commercial issues.[2]

Teams[edit]

Canary Islands location of the 2016–17 Primera División teams

A total of 16 teams contest the league in the current season, including 14 sides from the 2015–16 season and two promoted from the 2015–16 Segunda División.

Team Home city Stadium
Athletic Club Basque Country (autonomous community) Bilbao Lezama
Atlético de Madrid Community of Madrid Madrid Cerro del Espino
FC Barcelona Catalonia Barcelona Joan Gamper
Real Betis Andalusia Seville Luis del Sol
RCD Espanyol Catalonia Barcelona Dani Jarque
Fundación Albacete Castilla-La Mancha Albacete Andrés Iniesta
UD Granadilla Tenerife Sur Canary Islands Granadilla de Abona Francisco Suárez
Levante UD Valencian Community Valencia El Terrer
Oiartzun KE Basque Country (autonomous community) Oiartzun Karla Lekuona
Rayo Vallecano Community of Madrid Madrid Ciudad Deportiva
Real Sociedad Basque Country (autonomous community) San Sebastián Zubieta
Santa Teresa CD Extremadura Badajoz La Granadilla
Sporting de Huelva Andalusia Huelva El Conquero
UD Tacuense Canary Islands San Cristóbal de La Laguna Pablos Abril
Valencia CF Valencian Community Valencia Paterna
Zaragoza CFF Aragon Zaragoza Pedro Sancho

List of champions[edit]

The following list shows all champions of the Spanish women's football league.[3] Before creation of the league, from 1983 to 1988 the Copa de la Reina de Fútbol winners were the Spanish Champions.

Season Teams Champion Points Runner-up Points Third place Points
División de Honor
1988–89 9 Peña Barcilona 24 Parque Alcobendas 21 RCD Español 20
1989–90 12 Atlético Villa de Madrid 43 Peña Barcilona 39 RCD Español 30
1990–91 8 Oiartzun KE 20 Atlético Villa de Madrid 20 Añorga KKE 20
1991–92 8 Añorga KKE FC Barcelona Oiartzun KE
1992–93 7 CD Oroquieta Villaverde 24 Añorga KKE 21 FC Barcelona 20
1993–94 10 CD Oroquieta Villaverde 49 Añorga KKE 42 FC Barcelona 40
1994–95 10 Añorga KKE 48 CD Oroquieta Villaverde 40 RCD Espanyol 34
1995–96 9 Añorga KKE 36 CD Oroquieta Villaverde 31 RCD Espanyol 30
1996–97 42 Sant Vicent València CFF [N 1] CE Sabadell - -
1997–98 42 Atlético Málaga [N 2] Sant Vicent València CFF - -
1998–99 43 CD Oroquieta Villaverde [N 3] Irex Puebla - -
1999–2000 50 Irex Puebla [N 4] AD Torrejón CF - -
2000–01 54 Levante UD [N 5] Eibartarrak - -
Superliga
2001–02 11 Levante UD 57 Irex Puebla 51 RCD Espanyol 37
2002–03 12 Athletic Club 55 Levante UD 55 Irex Puebla 46
2003–04 14 Athletic Club 60 CE Sabadell 58 Levante UD 58
2004–05 14 Athletic Club 66 Levante UD 63 RCD Espanyol 57
2005–06 13 RCD Espanyol 60 CD Híspalis[N 6] 60 Levante UD 55
2006–07 14 Athletic Club 64 RCD Espanyol 63 Levante UD 55
2007–08 14 Levante UD 71 Rayo Vallecano 71 Athletic Club 53
2008–09 16 Rayo Vallecano 81 Levante UD 76 Athletic Club 65
2009–10 22 Rayo Vallecano [N 7] RCD Espanyol - Athletic Club -
2010–11 23 Rayo Vallecano [N 8] RCD Espanyol - Athletic Club -
Primera División
2011–12 18 FC Barcelona 94 Athletic Club 91 RCD Espanyol 76
2012–13 16 FC Barcelona 76 Athletic Club 74 Atlético Madrid 68
2013–14 16 FC Barcelona 79 Athletic Club 69 Atlético Madrid 54
2014–15 16 FC Barcelona 77 Atlético Madrid 69 Athletic Club 65
2015–16 16 Athletic Club 78 FC Barcelona 77 Atlético Madrid 69
2016–17 16 Atlético Madrid 78 FC Barcelona 75 Valencia CF 68

Performance by club[edit]

Athletic Bilbao celebrating its fourth title, won in 2007
Teams Winners Runners-Up Winning years
Basque Country (autonomous community) Athletic Club 5 3 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2016
Catalonia FC Barcelona 4 3 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Valencian Community Levante UD 3 3 2001, 2002, 2008
Basque Country (autonomous community) Añorga KKE 3 2 1992, 1995, 1996
Community of Madrid Oroquieta Villaverde 3 2 1993, 1994, 1999
Community of Madrid Rayo Vallecano 3 1 2009, 2010, 2011
Community of Madrid Atlético Madrid 2 2 1990,[a] 2017
Catalonia RCD Espanyol 1 3 2006
Extremadura Irex Puebla 1 2 2000
Catalonia Peña Barcilona 1 1 1989
Valencian Community Sant Vicent València CFF 1 1 1997[b]
Basque Country (autonomous community) Oiartzun KE 1 0 1991
Andalusia Atlético Málaga 1 0 1998
Catalonia CE Sabadell 0 2
Community of Madrid FFP Alcobendas 0 1
Community of Madrid AD Torrejón CF 0 1
Basque Country (autonomous community) SD Eibar 0 1
Andalusia CD Híspalis 0 1
  1. ^ Title won as Atlético Villa de Madrid.
  2. ^ Title won as Sant Vicent València CFF.

All-time Primera División table[edit]

This table includes all games played since the 2001–02 season, when the Superliga was created.

Pos S Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts 2015–16 league
1 15 Athletic Club 420 300 58 62 1210 420 +790 958 Primera División
2 16 Levante UD 436 283 73 80 1058 384 +674 922
3 16 RCD Espanyol 442 244 70 128 1078 621 +457 802
4 14 Rayo Vallecano 398 233 58 107 949 531 +418 757
5 12 FC Barcelona 344 215 48 81 831 332 +499 693
6 11 Atlético Madrid 318 181 63 74 673 538 +135 606
7 11 Real Sociedad 322 120 69 133 443 455 −12 429
8 12 Zaragoza CFF 346 120 61 165 513 669 −156 421
9 11 Sporting de Huelva 316 118 65 133 488 526 −38 419
10 10 Valencia CF[a] 292 124 41 127 497 475 +22 413
11 10 AD Torrejón CF 250 120 39 91 505 429 +76 399 Regional leagues
12 8 CFF Irex Puebla 170 92 22 56 385 269 +116 298 Dissolved
13 12 Oviedo Moderno CF[b] 314 73 62 179 363 697 −334 281 Segunda División
14 9 SD Lagunak 248 75 38 135 295 519 −224 263 Regional leagues
15 7 CD Híspalis[c] 170 64 20 86 327 439 −112 212 Segunda División
16 7 UD Collerense 204 55 36 113 295 466 −171 201
17 5 UE L'Estartit 140 51 18 71 229 274 −45 171
18 5 CE Sant Gabriel 152 49 24 79 213 307 −94 171
19 5 CFF Estudiantes de Huelva 118 50 19 49 284 241 +43 166[d] Dissolved
20 4 CE Sabadell FC 94 50 15 29 292 175 +117 165 Segunda División
21 5 Sevilla FC[c] 138 40 21 77 169 285 −116 141
22 3 Santa Teresa CD 90 28 18 44 104 161 −57 102 Primera División
23 4 Atlético Málaga[e] 114 26 17 71 118 315 −197 95 Segunda División
24 2 UD Granadilla Tenerife Sur 60 27 12 21 102 85 +17 93 Primera División
25 5 CF Pozuelo de Alarcón 124 24 14 86 173 390 −217 86 Segunda División
26 4 CD Nuestra Señora de Belén 94 22 7 65 109 357 −248 73
27 3 Fundación Albacete 90 17 19 54 122 232 −110 70 Primera División
28 2 FC Levante Las Planas 60 15 9 36 61 120 −59 54 Segunda División
29 2 CFF Badajoz Olivenza[f] 64 13 12 39 69 139 −70 51 Regional leagues
30 2 UD Las Palmas 50 14 6 30 80 114 −34 48 Dissolved
31 2 SD Reocín 62 11 10 41 72 188 −116 43
32 2 Oiartzun KE 60 10 12 38 47 141 −94 42 Primera División
33 1 Real Betis 30 10 4 16 36 51 −15 34
34 1 Granada CF 30 5 7 18 41 81 −40 22 Segunda División
35 1 SPC Llanos de Olivenza 30 6 2 22 28 64 −36 20
36 2 Real Valladolid 52 4 8 40 40 167 −127 20 Dissolved
37 3 ADP Nuestra Señora de la Antigua 68 5 5 58 50 280 −230 20
38 1 FVPR El Olivo 34 5 4 25 43 112 −69 19 Segunda División
39 1 UD Tacuense 30 3 6 21 22 85 −63 15 Primera División
40 2 SD Eibar 53 4 7 42 49 175 −126 19 Segunda División
41 1 FCF Atlético Jiennense[g] 24 3 2 19 23 81 −58 11 Regional leagues
42 2 Gimnàstic de Tarragona 52 3 1 48 25 224 −199 10 Dissolved
43 1 Gijón FF 24 0 1 23 19 96 −77 1 Segunda División
Updated to match(es) played on the end of the 2016–17 season. Source:
Notes:
  1. ^ Games played as Colegio Alemán included.
  2. ^ Currenlty named Real Oviedo.
  3. ^ a b Games between 2001 and 2007 are included in CD Híspalis, while games since 2009 are included in Sevilla FC.
  4. ^ 3 points docked.
  5. ^ Currently named Málaga CF.
  6. ^ Currently named CD Badajoz.
  7. ^ Current name, played in Primera División as Real Jaén.

List of top goalscorer by season[edit]

Season Player Club Goals
2001–02
2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
2005–06 Andalusia Auxiliadora Jiménez Sevilla FC 29
2006–07
2007–08 Community of Madrid Natalia Pablos Rayo Vallecano 24
2008–09 Navarre Erika Vázquez Athletic Club 32
2009–10
2010–11
2011–12 Community of Madrid Sonia Bermúdez FC Barcelona 38
2012–13 Community of Madrid Sonia Bermúdez FC Barcelona
2013–14 Community of Madrid Sonia Bermúdez FC Barcelona 28
2014–15 Community of Madrid Sonia Bermúdez FC Barcelona 22
Aragon Adriana Martín Levante UD
2015–16 Community of Madrid Jennifer Hermoso FC Barcelona 24
2016–17 Community of Madrid Jennifer Hermoso FC Barcelona 35

See also[edit]

Copa de la Reina de Fútbol

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a final game where Sant Vicent defeated Sabadell
  2. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Atlético Málaga beat Sant Vicènt by 2–0.
  3. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Oroquieta Villaverde beat Irex Puebla.
  4. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Irex Puebla beat Torrejón in the penalty shootout after a draw by 0–0.
  5. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Levante beat Eibartarrak by 4–0.
  6. ^ Sevilla FC participated as sponsor of CD Híspalis, before creating its own team in 2008.
  7. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a double-legged final where Rayo Vallecano won 1–0 and 1–1.
  8. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a double-legged final where Rayo Vallecano won 2–2 and 1–2.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reunión Comisión Mixta de seguimiento de la Superliga
  2. ^ "Iberdrola patrocinará la Primera División Femenina" (in Spanish). La Liga. 22 August 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Spain - List of Women's Champions". RSSSF. 2010. Retrieved 8 May 2011. 

External links[edit]