Progear

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Progear
Progear arcade flyer.jpg
Japanese Arcade flyer with art by Junya Inoue
Developer(s)CAVE
Publisher(s)Capcom
Director(s)Junya Inoue
Producer(s)Kenichi Takano
Tatsuya Minami
Designer(s)Akira Wakabayashi
Fusayuki Watariguchi
Hiroyuki Tanaka
Programmer(s)Satoshi Kōyama
Takashi Ichimura
Tsuneki Ikeda
Artist(s)Junya Inoue
Composer(s)Yukinori Kikuchi
Platform(s)Arcade
Release
Genre(s)Bullet hell
Mode(s)
CabinetUpright
Arcade systemCP System II
SoundQSound

Progear[a] is a 2001 horizontally scrolling bullet hell arcade video game developed by CAVE and published by Capcom for the CP System II board.[1][2] Set in the fictional country of Parts, players assume the role of children controlling a plane equipped with the titular propelling engine to overthrow the Metoruin sages and their new world order. It was the sixth shoot 'em up game from CAVE, their first horizontally oriented shooter, and their eighth video game overall.

Initially envisioned as a vertical-scrolling shooter and intended to be their last game, Progear was created by CAVE as a collaboration with Capcom and served as their first horizontal-scrolling shooter title, with bullet dodging and enemy destruction being the main focus while adapting the company's shoot 'em up gameplay style in a horizontal format but faced a problematic development cycle before its launch to the market. Though first released in arcades, the game was later ported to mobile phone platforms, each one featuring various changes compared to the original version and has since been re-released as part of the Capcom Home Arcade plug and play game system.

Progear proved to be popular in arcades among Japanese players and garnered positive reception from critics since its inclusion on the Capcom Home Arcade system, with praise given to the anime-style steampunk visuals, gameplay and accessibility, though the music was criticized. It was CAVE's only horizontal-scrolling shooter until Deathsmiles in 2007.

Gameplay[edit]

Arcade version screenshot.

Progear is a steampunk-themed horizontally scrolling bullet hell game where players assume the role of children controlling a plane equipped with the titular propelling engine through five stages in order to overthrow the Metoruin sages and their new world order.[3][4][5] At the start, players are given the option to choose between two pilots (planes) and three co-pilots (gunners), each with their own advantages and weaknesses which determines the effectiveness of their respective modes, in addition of changing character's costume and formation of gunners by performing specific button commands at the selection screen.[3][4][5]

As with previous shoot 'em up titles from CAVE, players can alternate between two shot modes;[3][4][5][6] "Pilot" mode fires stronger attack as the gunner shoots without locking on a target, while "Gunner" mode turns the plane's shot weaker and its movement speed becomes slower but the co-pilot locks on and fire against enemies with increased firepower. Players are also equipped with a number of bombs capable of inflicting damage against enemies depending on the number of jewels collected, which increases its attack output.[3][4] Through the stages, players can pick up items along the way by destroying enemy carriers such as "P" icons to increase the plane's attack power, "B" icons to increase the number of bomb stocks, a "MAX" icon that increases the plane's firepower to maximum level after losing a live and 1UPs.[citation needed] By collecting another bomb stock with three bombs in reserve, several gameplay events occur.[citation needed]

A notable gameplay aspect is the scoring system based on jewels;[3][4][5] When an enemy is destroyed, nearby bullets are converted into rins or jewels depending on the player's current weapon mode when destruction occurs. In "Pilot" mode, only bullets nearby an enemy unit are converted into rings, while enemy bullets close to those of another enemy are converted into jewels in "Gunner" mode respectively.[4][5] When changing between shot modes, players can grab rings and jewels automatically.[4][5] By having a high ring rank, players obtain jewels of high value and viceversa, however said rank is lowered by losing a live or using a bomb.[4][5] At the end of each stage, players are evaluated based on how active their gunner was and overall performance.[5]

Synopsis[edit]

Plot[edit]

The plot summary of Progear is explained through supplementary materials.[3][7] Sometime in the past, people of the country of Parts found a way to become immortal but only with elderly nobles. Among these elders who obtained immortality were Ballossum Pench, Gabriel Hammer, Jimchuck Spanner, Olsorro Slasher and Leonard Drill. They later became to be known as the Motoruin sages, eventually attempting to take over the Parts kingdom and began a new world order, collapsing the government and destroying villages of the country in the process. As their plans unfold, five children decided to battle the Motoruin using another new invention: the titular semi-automatic propelling engine.

Characters[edit]

  • Ring: 14 years old pilot of the Gambler biplane.
  • Bolt: 15 years old pilot of the Militant plane.
  • Chain: 14 years old gunner of Alpha.
  • Nail: 12 years old gunner of Beta.
  • Rivet: 17 years old gunner of Gamma.

Development[edit]

Progear was created as a collaboration effort with Capcom by most of the same team that worked on previous projects at CAVE, serving as their first horizontally scrolling shooter game, in addition of being the six shoot 'em up title from the company and their eight video game overall.[7][8][9][10][11][12][13] Kenichi Takano served as producer with director Junya Inoue.[7][8][11][14] Tsuneki Ikeda served as chief programmer alongside Satoshi Kōyama and Takashi Ichimura.[8][9][15] Akira Wakabayashi, Fusayuki Watariguchi, Hiroyuki Tanaka and Kengo Arai acted as designers.[8][16][17][18] The soundtrack was composed by Yukinori Kikuchi, with Ryūichi Yabuki creating the sound effects.[8][19][20]

Progear originally went under the working title Garden of Progear[b] and was first envisioned as a vertical-scrolling shooter, however Capcom remarked that the name was "too highbrow" and one of the higher-ups at CAVE told the team during their presentation pitch that the project should be a vertical-scrolling shooter instead, with Ikeda revealing in a 2010 interview that the project was also intended to be their last release as the company was considering leaving the arcade market due to several factors at the time.[7][9][11][12] The team dediced to make bullet dodging and enemy destruction its main focus, while adapting the company's shoot 'em up gameplay style in a horizontal format but the project would go through a problematic development cycle until it was released.[7][10][12][13][21] Both Ikeda and Inoue stated that working with the CP System II platform, which marked the second time CAVE made use of an external arcade board, proved to be difficult as the hardware was underpowered compared to the previous board used for Guwange, with designers using a limited number of colors to remake drawings created in Photoshop.[11][12][13]

Inoue revealed that the characters were named after mechanical parts, while the reason having children as lead characters was due to his fascination of kids fighting against evil.[13][14][21]

Release[edit]

Progear was first released in arcades by Capcom in 2001, using the CP System II board.[2] The English version removes all of the voice acting from characters.[5] On 21 October 1990, an album containing music from the game was published exclusively in Japan by Suleputer.[19] On 20 March 2014, another album was released by SuperSweep in Japan, featuring the original uncompressed music as well as a collection of official artwork.[22] In 2004, the title was later ported to mobile phone platforms such as EZweb, i-mode and Yahoo Mobile.[23][24][25] Both the i-mode and EzWeb versions were split into two separate releases, while another version titled Progear DX for Yahoo Mobile phones contains all five stages.[23][26] In 2019, it was re-released as part of the Capcom Home Arcade plug and play game system.[27][28][29]

Reception[edit]

In Japan, Game Machine listed Progear on their 1 June 2001 issue as being the fourth most-successful arcade game of the year.[30] The game has been met with positive reception from critics since its inclusion on the Capcom Home Arcade plug and play system.[31] Pete Brown of GameSpot noted it to be "a standout side-scrolling shooter with beautiful 2D graphics and a reasonable difficulty curve, the latter of which is somewhat rare for the genre".[32] Damien McFerran of Nintendo Life gave positive remarks to the graphics and steampunk design.[33] Carlos Leiva of Spanish website Vandal gave positive comments to the game's action, bosses, gameplay and original steampunk setting.[34] David Jenkins of Metro praised its anime-style steampunk artwork design and accessibility, regarding it as "one of CAVE’s best".[35] oliveroidubocal of Jeuxvideo.com praised its visuals.[36] In contrast, however, Hardcore Gaming 101 remarked the music to be "the most lackluster thing" from the game.[5]

Legacy[edit]

Gameplay screenshots from the title were used in the music video for the song "Ikaruga" by the band Discordance Axis.[citation needed] Ring's Gambler plane appears as part of a Capcom-themed DLC for Dariusburst Chronicle Saviour.[37]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Also known as Storm of Progear (Japanese: プロギアの嵐, Hepburn: Purogia no Arashi) in Japan.
  2. ^ プロギアの庭 (Purogia no Niwa)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Progear [Grey Board]". arcade-history.com. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Akagi, Masumi (13 October 2006). カプコン Capcom; ケイブ Cave. アーケードTVゲームリスト 国内•海外編 (1971-2005) (in Japanese) (1st ed.). Amusement News Agency. pp. 25, 26. ISBN 978-4990251215.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Progear no Arashi arcade flyer (Capcom, JP)
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Progear". shmups.com. SHMUPS!. 7 November 2003. Archived from the original on 12 July 2018. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Progear". Hardcore Gaming 101. 4 May 2017. Archived from the original on 18 November 2019. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  6. ^ Progear manual (Arcade, EU)
  7. ^ a b c d e "大集プロギアの嵐". Monthly Arcadia (in Japanese). No. 12. Enterbrain. May 2001. (Translation by Gamengai. Archived 2019-11-22 at the Wayback Machine).
  8. ^ a b c d e CAVE (17 January 2001). Progear (Arcade). Capcom. Level/area: Staff roll.
  9. ^ a b c "井上淳哉". Game Staff List Association (in Japanese). BrandGamer-R・TYPERS. 2002. Archived from the original on 1 July 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2020. (Translation by Gamengai. Archived 2019-11-22 at the Wayback Machine).
  10. ^ a b Pilot, Alex; Ruchet, Sébastien (2006). Japon: Histoire du Shooting Game (15min 13sec). Game One. Japon deux points (in French). ViacomCBS International Media Networks France. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  11. ^ a b c d "CAVE 15th Anniversary ~Shoot'em All!!~". Monthly Arcadia (in Japanese). No. 118. Enterbrain. March 2010. pp. 46–55. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2019-09-14 at the Wayback Machine).
  12. ^ a b c d "Dossier Shoot 'em up". IG Magazine (in French). No. 8. Ankama Presse. May–June 2010. (Translation by Gaming.moe. Archived 2019-02-13 at the Wayback Machine).
  13. ^ a b c d Kemps, Heidi (13 September 2010). "The Art of Shooting with Junya Inoue". Otaku USA. Sovereign Media. Archived from the original on 24 February 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  14. ^ a b インタビュー - : 井上淳哉. ケイブシューティング史 こんにちは17年 ありがとう16年 (in Japanese). Cave. 24 August 2010. pp. 172–175. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2019-12-30 at the Wayback Machine).
  15. ^ 市村 崇志. ケイブシューティング史 こんにちは17年 ありがとう16年 (in Japanese). Cave. 24 August 2010. pp. 180–182. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2020-01-02 at the Wayback Machine).
  16. ^ "THE LUNATIC 鋳薔薇". inhgroup.com (in Japanese). 2006. Archived from the original on 22 July 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2019-12-30 at the Wayback Machine).
  17. ^ 田中 周幸. ケイブシューティング史 こんにちは17年 ありがとう16年 (in Japanese). Cave. 24 August 2010. pp. 183–186. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2020-05-10 at the Wayback Machine).
  18. ^ 若林 明. ケイブシューティング史 こんにちは17年 ありがとう16年 (in Japanese). Cave. 24 August 2010. pp. 195–198. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2020-05-10 at the Wayback Machine).
  19. ^ a b Greening, Chris (20 September 2010). "Progear Original Soundtrack". vgmonline.net. Video Game Music Online. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  20. ^ Fuentes, Edgar S. (10 June 2020). "Vandal Game Music: CAVE. Un rítmico despliegue balístico — Repasamos la amplia carrera musical de una las compañías más importantes en shooters de nave". Vandal (in Spanish). El Español. Archived from the original on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  21. ^ a b ボーナス!ケイブ事実! - プロギアの嵐. ケイブシューティング史 こんにちは17年 ありがとう16年 (in Japanese). Cave. 24 August 2010. pp. 203–224. (Translation by Shmuplations. Archived 2019-12-30 at the Wayback Machine).
  22. ^ Greening, Chris (12 June 2014). "Progear Sound & Art Collection". vgmonline.net. Video Game Music Online. Archived from the original on 29 November 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  23. ^ a b "iモードとボーダフォンライブ!で「プロギアの嵐」を配信". ITmedia Mobile (in Japanese). ITmedia. 28 April 2004. Archived from the original on 27 August 2005. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  24. ^ "アーケードの人気STG『プロギアの嵐』がiモードとボーダフォンライブ!に登場". Dengeki Online (in Japanese). Kadokawa Game Linkage. 28 April 2004. Archived from the original on 5 October 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  25. ^ "横スクロールSHT「プロギアの嵐」が携帯に!". SoftBank Games (in Japanese). ITmedia. 28 April 2004. Archived from the original on 5 October 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  26. ^ "900i専用「プロギアの嵐DX」を公開". ITmedia Mobile (in Japanese). ITmedia. 8 September 2004. Archived from the original on 11 September 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  27. ^ Webster, Andrew (16 April 2019). "Capcom is launching a plug-and-play mini-arcade with Mega Man, Street Fighter, and more". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 27 September 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  28. ^ Robinson, Martin (16 April 2019). "Capcom takes on the mini console craze with a massive £200 stick". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 16 April 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  29. ^ McMullen, Chris (17 January 2020). "At Home With Capcom's Home Arcade". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on 27 May 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  30. ^ "Game Machine's Best Hit Games 25 - TVゲーム機ーソフトウェア (Video Game Software)". Game Machine (in Japanese). No. 635. Amusement Press, Inc. 1 June 2001. p. 21.
  31. ^ Freeman, Will (6 November 2019). "Capcom Home Arcade review – authentic retro gaming at a cost". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Archived from the original on 13 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  32. ^ Brown, Pete (2 May 2019). "A Quick Look At Every Game In The Capcom Home Arcade Collection". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  33. ^ McFerran, Damien (4 November 2019). "Hardware Review: Capcom Home Arcade Is The Most Ludicrous Micro-Console Yet, And We're In Love". Nintendo Life. Nlife Media. Archived from the original on 25 December 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  34. ^ Leiva, Carlos (4 November 2019). "Análisis Capcom Home Arcade ¿Merece la pena?". Vandal (in Spanish). El Español. Archived from the original on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  35. ^ Jenkins, David (6 November 2019). "Capcom Home Arcade review – the biggest mini console ever made". Metro. DMG Media. Archived from the original on 8 November 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  36. ^ oliveroidubocal (22 November 2019). "Test Capcom Home Arcade : aussi bien qu'une borne ?". Jeuxvideo.com (in French). Webedia. Archived from the original on 26 November 2019. Retrieved 15 May 2020.
  37. ^ "Press Releases- New DARIUSBURST Chronicle Saviours Capcom DLC and Physical PS4 Release Coming Soon!". Gamasutra. UBM Technology Group. 5 February 2017. Archived from the original on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020.

External links[edit]