Sima Nenadović

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Sima Sima Nenadović
Сима Ненадовић
Sima Nenadović.jpg
Nickname(s)Sima
Born1793
Brankovina (modern Serbia)
Died26 July 1815 (22 years old)
Dublje
AllegianceSerbia Serbian revolutionaries
Years of service1813–1815
RankVojvoda
UnitValjevo nahija
Battles/wars

Simeon "Sima" Nenadović (Serbian Cyrillic: Сима Ненадовић; 1793–1815) was a Serbian voivode (military commander) in the Second Serbian Uprising of the Serbian revolution. He was part of the Nenadović family, among which was his brother Prota Mateja, the first Serbian Prime Minister, his father Aleksa Nenadović (1749-1804), his nephew Ljubomir Nenadović, and his uncle Jakov Nenadović.

Life[edit]

Simeon Nenadović "Sima" was born in 1793, in Brankovina. His father was knez Aleksa Nenadović, and his mother's name was Jovanka. The renegade janissaries, known as dahia, took control of the Smederevan Sanjak in 1802, after murdering Vizier Hadži Mustafa Pasha. The four leaders divided the Sanjak, ruling as dictators, also removing the rights granted by Sultan Selim III. In 1804, the jannisaries executed more than 70 prominent Serb nobles, among which were Aleksa (Sima's father), and Ilija Birčanin. Sima finished Great School in Belgrade, and military school in Vienna.

The slaughter of the dukes triggered the First Serbian Uprising.[1] Karadjordje was elected as leader. Sima's uncle, Jakov Nenadović, was one of the most distinguished revolutionary commanders, and the first Serbian Interior Minister (1811–1813). His older brother, Mateja, known as Prota Mateja, was an Orthodox archpriest and the first Serbian Prime Minister.

Sima did only participate in the last year of the Uprising, in the battles on the Drina (1813). With the suppression of the revolt by the Ottomans, Sima fled Serbia and helped his brother Mateja in his diplomatic missions (1814–15). He returned to Serbia, immediately with the outbreak of the Second Serbian Uprising (1815). He became a voivode of the Valjevo nahija. He died in combat against the Ottomans at Dublje, during the Battle of Dublje [sr] on 26 July 1815, at the age of 22.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leopold von Ranke, "History of Servia and the Servian Revolution", p. 119-120

Sources[edit]

  • Milićević, Milan (1888). Поменик знаменитих људи у српскога народа новијега доба. Srpska kraljevska štamparija. pp. 412–414. (Public Domain)
  • Velibor Berko Savić, Nenadovići, Valjevo 2004