Starbase Indy

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Starbase Indy
Starbase Indy logo.png
Status Active
Genre Star Trek/General Science Fiction
Venue Wyndham Indianapolis West
Location(s) Indianapolis, Indiana
Country United States
Inaugurated 1988
Organized by Starbase Indy Committee
Website
www.starbaseindy.com

Starbase Indy is a science fiction convention. Its mission, revised in 2017, is "Celebrating Star Trek's vision of the future by promoting humanitarianism and STEM education today." Refocusing on Roddenberry's vision[1] of a hopeful future, Starbase Indy reorganized as public benefit corporation with the purpose of raising the interest and improving the knowledge and skills of all ages in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through engagement in public discussion, lectures, and hands-on programs during our once a year event. We also work to eliminate prejudice and discrimination through intentional inclusivity, promotion of diversity, and specifically designed activities.

Starbase Indy is held annually during the Friday through Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend in Indianapolis, Indiana. It draws attendees mainly from the Midwestern United States, but attendees have registered from as far away as Germany and Australia.

History[edit]

The idea for Starbase Indy germinated after Indianapolis Star Trek fans attended a convention in St. Louis and decided to create their own convention. The first Starbase Indy was held in March 1988 in the Adam’s Mark Hotel and the main guest star was Michael Dorn, who portrayed Worf in Star Trek: The Next Generation. In 1990, the convention moved to the Marriott East in Indianapolis and the now-traditional Thanksgiving weekend.[1] Beginning in 1989, the convention adopted The Next Generation as part of its name, then the Third Generation in 1990, and so on. With Starbase Indy: The Eighth Generation in 1995, the local organizing committee ended the initial run of Starbase Indy. In 2004, after a professional convention company bowed out, a new fan-run committee organized Starbase Indy: the Ninth Generation. In 2008 Vulkon Entertainment, which had planned to take over the convention, bowed out days before the event.[1] Local fans put together a one-day event, known as Freekon, and later in 2009 began meeting monthly to plan the 2009 Starbase Indy convention.[2] The local organizing committee has continued the Thanksgiving weekend tradition ever since. For 2011, due to the hotel schedule, the convention had to be moved to Dec. 9-11. For 2012, the convention returned to its three-day Thanksgiving weekend tradition. In 2015, Starbase Indy returned to its original home, now known as the Wyndham Indianapolis West. [3]

In 2017, Starbase Indy began a rebranding effort, adopting a new mission statement, "Celebrating Star Trek's vision of the future by promoting humanitarianism and STEM education today." While continuing the "Geek Family Thanksgiving Tradition" convention programming, organizers are also increasing the amount of science programming available at the convention.

Guest stars[edit]

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004


Earlier Years

Besides Michael Dorn, other guest stars at Starbase Indy have included Marina Sirtis and Majel Barrett Roddenberry in 1989; Nichelle Nichols in 1991;[4] Leonard Nimoy in 1992;[1] Robert Picardo and Dwight Schultz in 1995.

Convention activities[edit]

Starbase Indy traditionally includes the typical Q&A sessions with guest stars, a dealers’ room, panel discussions on science and science fiction topics,[5] a masquerade,[6] a dance, and appearances by scientists and authors. Programming in the past has included sessions on screenwriting, prop building,[6] building robots, filk music, and meetings for Star Trek clubs.

Starbase Indy is currently a registered non-profit organization. Each year it supports charities. In the past, Starbase Indy charities have included Cats Haven, Lungevity[30], The Jason Foundation [31], Toys for Tots, Precious Paws, and Camp Awareness.[6][7] In 2010 the charities were Cats Haven and Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]