Talk:Addiction

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Let's talk about our problems and make them go away.[edit]

Hi. My name's Hulk. I'm addicted to lying about my name.

Now that that's out of the way, I've been referred here by a concerned and angry citizen.

I can't see the point of singling out drug addiction as its own thing in the lead of an article about general addiction, especially before the part about the main topic. Can you?

Just another rewarding thing that people crave. I get that there's a specific subtopic article for it, and I'm not against Wikilinking it in the lead. Just should go with the others in Paragraph 2. Probably first in that list, since it's the most famous, but not bigger than addiction itself. InedibleHulk (talk) 19:22, October 20, 2014 (UTC)

So should I take the silence to mean nobody else sees the point either? InedibleHulk (talk) 19:02, November 22, 2014 (UTC)
Behavioral addiction and drug addiction are a dichotomy. Stop editing the lead sentence. Seppi333 (Insert  | Maintained) 19:36, 22 November 2014 (UTC)
Dichotomies are for opposites. There's a slight difference between compulsively seeking rewarding sex and compulsively seeking rewarding drugs, but only as much as between rewarding food and rewarding gambling. Not two different things.
I'll stop removing it from the lead when I get a more sensible reason to keep it. InedibleHulk (talk) 20:34, November 22, 2014 (UTC)
A drug isn't a natural reward. Added: I meant it's this. Seppi333 (Insert  | Maintained) 21:05, 22 November 2014 (UTC)
Alright, I've removed "natural" and re-piped to the more encompassing reward system. Seem fair? InedibleHulk (talk) 21:16, November 22, 2014 (UTC)
As for this, there's no mutual exclusivity. Plenty of people are addicted to drugs and gambling. InedibleHulk (talk) 21:17, November 22, 2014 (UTC)
Mutual exclusivity simply means no element belongs in both categories... In any event, it's fine with the current language. Seppi333 (Insert  | Maintained) 21:22, 22 November 2014 (UTC)
Alright. Then we're mutually content. "Stimuli" works. InedibleHulk (talk) 21:40, November 22, 2014 (UTC)

Definition[edit]

Current text hinges on a 1992 JAMA article. Perhaps PMID 22073026 would be more current? LeadSongDog come howl! 02:18, 19 June 2015 (UTC)

Sorry for the delay in responding - didn't notice this until now.
All compulsions are pathologically reinforced behaviors, but the main difference between that paper and the characterizations used by the reviews in several sections of this article is that these reviews require that the behavior/drug be rewarding - i.e., activate the reward system, particularly the mesolimbic pathway/nucleus accumbens, in functional neuroimaging studies. The nucleus accumbens governs the response to positive reinforcement (the form of reinforcement that involves a reward), and it is there that ΔFosB overexpression has been shown to simultaneously occur with the appearance of addictive behavior and structural neurplasticity. It's a rather simple definition, but it actually has rather significant/profound implications for the neuropsychology and molecular neurobiology involving a drug or behavior. Seppi333 (Insert ) 03:46, 19 June 2015 (UTC)

Missing concepts[edit]

Operant conditioning:

Classical conditioning:

Neuroepigenetics:

Seppi333 (Insert ) 14:25, 22 June 2015 (UTC)