Talk:Bicarbonate

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Electrodes[edit]

what happens when at electodes

Solubility of bicarbonate[edit]

Is HCO3- soluble or insoluble?

Bicarbonates are rather soluble. An example is that Calcium Bicarbonate is soluble while Calcium Carbonate isn't. LoyalSoldier 04:53, 21 March 2007 (UTC)

bicarbonates and gas[edit]

Do bicarbonates evolve gas no matter what you mix it with?


No.

Bicarbonates are mostly soluble in water and some acids but not all bicarbonates are soluble. Am doing a research on the reaction between zinc chloride and sodiun hydrogen bicarbonate. Any help with what the end products will be? I am anticipation zinc bicarbonate {Zn(CO3)2 and anothetr complex compound of Zn...... Answer needed urgently

bicarbonate food sources[edit]

What foods have bicarbonate in them?

Bread, cakes, donuts. Those that raises when you heat them Kboom 12:26, 12 June 2007 (UTC)

Title[edit]

What is the policy of Wikipedia concerning titles of pages? Since hydrogen carbonate is the more proper name, shouldn't the title be changed to that?

Both names are correct. The "Hydrogen" tags are generally used in chemicals with three or more hydrogen atoms. It is just like Acetic acid is suppose to be called ethanoic acid, but people call it acetic acid anyways. LoyalSoldier 04:55, 21 March 2007 (UTC)
Totally disagree; there's no such thing as 'bicarbonate.' It must have a co-ion, whether that's a hydrogen ion or a metal. The analogous name to acetic acid would be bicarbonate of soda, and even that acknowledges the sodium. What's the process to request a change to a page name? Madgenberyl (talk) 19:40, 15 May 2012 (UTC)

Equilibrium question[edit]

Which does the equilibrum shift toward when applied with heat, bicarbonate or carbonate?

Under what conditions? Both will decompose when heated, but bicarbonate will do so at a lower temperature. LoyalSoldier 22:46, 20 April 2007 (UTC)

Citations needed?[edit]

At least two of the "citations needed" tags on this page seem to be out of place. The first is on the carbonic acid-bicarbonate equilibrium reaction. This equation is very well-known and should hardly need a citation. The other is the mention of the fact that changes in pH within the body are harmful. The next sentence includes a link to the Wikipedia pages for acidosis and alkalosis, which explain in detail why physiological pH changes are a problem. Isn't a link to a Wikipedia page considered valid as a citation? Madgenberyl (talk) 19:53, 15 May 2012 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Not moved per discussion and common use. Materialscientist (talk) 06:02, 3 February 2013 (UTC) Materialscientist (talk) 06:02, 3 February 2013 (UTC)



BicarbonateHydrogencarbonate – IUPAC name is more proper. P76837 (talk) 20:46, 1 February 2013 (UTC)

  • Strong oppose that doesn't appear to be the IUPAC name hydrogen carbonate =/= "hydrogencarbonate" -- 65.92.180.137 (talk) 05:15, 2 February 2013 (UTC)
  • Strong oppose. No doubt the suggestion is well intentioned, but the term "hydrogencarbonate" is rare. --Smokefoot (talk) 19:10, 2 February 2013 (UTC)
  • Oppose. 'Hydrogencarbonate' is a rarely-used term, mainly appearing in school chemistry textbooks. Professional researchers tend to use the term 'bicarbonate'. The term 'hydrogen carbonate' is fairly common, but only as part of the name of a compound. For example, 'sodium bicarbonate' is more common than 'sodium hydrogen carbonate', both of which are much more common than 'sodium hydrogencarbonate'. --Ben (talk) 19:15, 2 February 2013 (UTC)
  • Oppose for almost every application bicarbonate is the term used. Graeme Bartlett (talk) 05:45, 3 February 2013 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

Bicarbonates of non alkali or alkanine earth metals[edit]

Are there any bicarbonates of metal which dont belong to the alkali or alkaline earth metals like Aluminium, Iron, Lead etc ive never seen any listed — Preceding unsigned comment added by Custard mustard sandwich (talkcontribs) 18:39, 3 February 2013 (UTC)

pKb[edit]

Correct me if I'm wrong, but given that for carbonic acid, pKa values are 6.367 (pKa1), 10.32 (pKa2), isn't the pKb of bicarbonate 14 - 6.367 = 7.633? pKb is a measure of how much it will react as a base (ie HCO3- +H2O ⇌ H2CO3 + OH-). The pKb currently listed here is that for carbonate. Adabow (talk) 04:48, 7 June 2013 (UTC)

Apparently pKb = 3.7 has to belong to carbonate, but the caveat is that pKa1 = 6.367 for H2CO3 is wrong, so your result is also incorrect. Infobox in the “carbonic acid” article currently demonstrates pKa1 of “H2CO3*”, not a real compound but a summary concentration of actual H2CO3 and (much more abundant) dissolved CO2 – it is explained later in article. Pure H2CO3’s pKa1 is claimed to equal 3.6, much lower (more acidic). IMHO we should simply delete the pKb= value from the infobox. Incnis Mrsi (talk) 07:37, 7 June 2013 (UTC)

Why "bi-"?[edit]

It would be good if this article explained why the word "bicarbonate" begins with "bi-". I had to google the answer: apparently it's because you need twice as many bicarbonate ions as carbonate ions to neutralise the same amount of acid. But I got that from an unreliable source. Could someone who can provide a reliable source add this? -- Dr Greg  talk  23:25, 31 January 2014 (UTC)