Talk:Break, Break, Break

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Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was page moved by Tanthalas39 after a discussion on AN. Soap Talk/Contributions 02:59, 4 September 2009 (UTC)


Break, Break, Break (poem)Break, Break, Break — This page was inappropriately moved without a discussion from Break, Break, Break. This page is about the poem, the originator of the phrase. The poem was written by British Poet Laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson, one of the most famous English poets. It is one of his most famous short poems and has the vast majority of google hits and google book hits. The only other use is a stub page for a non-notable movie that has no information on it and probably derived its title from this poem. This is the clear primary use, and it was moved by someone with faulty motives as described here. Ottava Rima (talk) 01:52, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

  • Oppose move - I'm not convinced this is the primary topic. Jeni (talk) 01:59, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
You'd have to provide evidence that the movie is some how notable. So far, you have done nothing but trolled and edit warred against a highly respected admin. Ottava Rima (talk) 02:16, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
No edit war has occurred, perhaps you should read up on the term. Jeni (talk) 02:25, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
Hmm, lets see. Jdelanoy removes a page and makes this one primary. You undo the action. That is edit warring. I didn't say "3RR". Ottava Rima (talk) 02:28, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
It wont let me paste a link into the template cover, so for anyone curious, here is the discussion on AN. -- Soap Talk/Contributions 02:59, 4 September 2009 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Short film[edit]

I don't know if it's of any use here, but in looking for sources for the unrelated film referenced above, I did find that a short film adaptation of this poem was made by Thomas A. Edison, Inc. in 1913. Directed by Charles H. France, the single-reel silent film starred Ben F. Wilson, Laura Sawyer, Charles Sutton, James Gordon and Mabel Trunnelle. Some of this information (not the cast) can be verified from its entry in the Library of Congress' copyright archive ("Motion Pictures 1912–1939". Catalog of Copyright Entries. United States Copyright Office. 1951. p. 180.) All the best, Steve T • C 21:47, 6 September 2009 (UTC)

I'm not sure really how it could really be adapted, as the poem isn't really a narrative. Ottava Rima (talk) 22:02, 6 September 2009 (UTC)
Yeah, that's what I was wondering. Some kind of nondiegetic mood piece, I thought, but one review called the film—titled A Day that is Dead—a drama and "a charming story of other days, with the angry breakers dashing on to a rock-bound coast as a background". Steve T • C 22:12, 6 September 2009 (UTC)
Weird. If I see anything about it in any sources on Tennyson, I'll mention it when the page gets expanded. New Historicism loves to analyze such things as that. Ottava Rima (talk) 22:23, 6 September 2009 (UTC)

File:W.E.F. Britten - The Early Poems of Alfred, Lord Tennyson - Break, Break, Break.jpg to appear as POTD[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:W.E.F. Britten - The Early Poems of Alfred, Lord Tennyson - Break, Break, Break.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on February 16, 2014. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2014-02-16. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thanks! — Crisco 1492 (talk) 23:32, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Picture of the day
Break, Break, Break

A 1901 illustration for "Break, Break, Break", an elegy by Lord Tennyson written in 1835 for his friend Arthur Hallam, who had died two years previously. Written during a period of relative isolation at Mablethorpe, Lincolnshire, the poem uses minimalistic terms and forgoes decorative aspects. In his biography of Tennyson, Michael Thorn describes it as "one of the great short lyrics".

Illustration: William Edward Frank Britten; restoration: Adam Cuerden
ArchiveMore featured pictures...