Talk:Chinese food therapy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject China (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject China, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of China related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Alternative medicine (Rated Stub-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Alternative medicine, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Alternative medicine related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the quality scale.
 
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 

Name change[edit]

The name of this article was changed from food therapy to Chinese food therapy because the phrase food therapy is far too generic to be claimed just by one culture or group. It could just as well be claimed as a modality of natural health, for example. -- John Gohde 15:53, 11 May 2004 (UTC)

I'm surprised this wasn't included[edit]

I'm surprised nothing was written about 熱氣. Certain types of food (greasy, fried, chocolate) are supposed to cause it, and and other types are supposed to nullify it (soup, tea), and 熱氣 is the supposed cause of ailments like sore throats, coughs, fevers, acme, and so on. --Yuje 23:49, July 24, 2005 (UTC)

That's specific to southern China. It's not easy to cover the food therapy of every region of China in one article. :-) — Instantnood 11:11, July 25, 2005 (UTC)
熱氣 means yang which is more generic than 燥火 濕熱 mentioned in the article which are more specific types of yang. Feel free to add that to the list too. Kowloonese 23:26, 21 March 2006 (UTC)

Daoism and Chinese food therapy[edit]

I'd be interested if Chinese food therapy was related to Daoism immortality practices. I'm taking a Chinese history class and in it I learned that one of the Daoist techniques for achieving immortality had to do with dietary practices. It would make sense especially if this is refering to particularly Chinese practices if those Daoist diets are related to the food therapy. Jztinfinity 02:42, 10 November 2006 (UTC)

Yi Shi Tong Yuan[edit]

The Chinese old proverb "Yi Shi Tong Yuan" (醫食同源) that means "medicine and diet both originated from the practice and experience of daily life"[1], I think, deserves its on article. However since none tried it, I think it should be at least addressed in the article.--Caspian blue 00:09, 14 May 2009 (UTC)

Dubious comparison[edit]

"In this way, this health system is in direct opposition to Louis Pasteur's germ theory of disease[dubious – discuss], being more aligned with Claude Bernard, and Antoine Bechamp's biological terrain theory of disease."

This is a truly ridiculous comparison. In developed societies, how many diseases these days are caused by "germs" ? Is heart disease caused by "germs" ? Is diabetes caused by "germs" ? Are strokes caused by "germs" ? Is cancer caused by "germs" ? Its nonsense.Eregli bob (talk) 10:28, 17 March 2012 (UTC)

I agree. While it is true that Traditional Chinese Medicinal Philosophy does not recognize "germs" i.e., pathogenic organisms, this comparison with Pasteur's germ theory in an attempt to set TCM as the opposite twin of Western Medicine is pointless purple prose. We should neuter the sentence, or take it out entirely.--Mr Fink (talk) 13:29, 17 March 2012 (UTC)

Recomended References[edit]

Here are some books:

"The Chinese Kitchen: Recipes, Techniques, Ingredients, History, and Memories from America's Leading Authority on Chinese Cooking" by Eileen Yin Fei-Lo

"Feng Shui and the 5-Element Kitchen" by Jurgen Heinrich Fahrnow

"The Feng Shui Cookbook: Creating Health and Harmony in Your Kitchen" by Elizabeth Miles

"Chinese Dietary Therapy" by Liu Jilin

"The Tao of Healthy Eating: Dietary Wisdom According to Traditional Chinese Medicine" by Bob Flaws

"Chinese Diet Therapy" by Zhao Muying

"Chinese Nutrition Therapy: Dietetics in Traditional Chinese Medicine" by Joerg Kastner

"Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition" by Paul Pitchford

"Prince Wen Hui's Cook: Chinese Dietary Therapy" by Bob Flaws and Honora Wolf

"A Spoonful of Ginger: Irresistible, Health-Giving Recipes from Asian Kitchens" by Nina Simonds

"Chinese System Of Food Cures: Prevention & Remedies" by Henry C. Lu

"Your Guide to Health with Foods & Herbs: Using the Wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine" by Zhang Yifang and Yao Yingzhi

"Heart Smart Chinese Cooking" by Stephen Wong

"The Healing Cuisine of China: 300 Recipes for Vibrant Health and Longevity" by Zhuo Zhao and George Ellis

"Chinese Foods for Longevity: The Art of Long Life" by Henry C. Lu

"Diseases Treated with Melons, Fruits and Vegetables: Traditional Chinese Medical Therapies" by Zongchang Xiu

"Chinese Healing Foods" by Rosa Ross

"Chinese System Of Foods For Health & Healing" by Henry C. Lu

"A Soup for the Qan: Chinese Dietary Medicine of the Mongol Era As Seen in Hu Sihui's Yinshan Zhengyao (Sir Henry Wellcome Asian Series)" by Paul D. Buell and Eugene N. Anderson

"Food as Medicine: A Traditional Chinese Medical Perspective" by Ted Zombolas and Jing Yuan

"Natural Remedies From The Chinese Cupboard: Healing Foods And Herbs" by Jing Pei Fang

"Five Laws for Healthy Living: Discover the Wisdom of Chinese Medicine to Nourish Your Life" by Angela Hicks and A. Hicks

"Diet Therapy of Diabetes (Chinese Edition)" by lei yong le

"The Book of Jook: Chinese Medicinal Porridges--A Healthy Alternative to the Typical Western Breakfast" by Bob Flaws

"Buddhist Health Preserving and Diet Therapy (Chinese Edition)" by Dong Xiao Kang

"New Knowledge on Family Diet Therapy (Chinese Edition)" by ben she

"Food, Medicine, and the Quest for Good Health" by Nancy N. Chen

"Diet Therapy for Cancers (Chinese Edition)" by zhang bing qi and an yu zhi

"The Care and Feeding of Your Chi: Feng Shui for Your Body" by Skye Alexander

"Chinese Diet Library: Heart Disease Diet Therapy" by Shen Hong

"The Chinese System of Using Foods to Stay Young" by Henry C. Lu

"Nourishing Life: Chinese Hundreds of Herb-medicine Imperial Cuisine (Chinese-English edition)" by Jiao Mingyao

"Healthy Life: Chinese Hundreds of Herb-medicine Imperial Cuisine (Chinese-English edition)" by Jiao Mingyao

"Prolonging Life: Chinese Hundreds of Herb-medicine Imperial Cuisine (Chinese-English edition)" by Jiao Mingyao

"Fruits As Medicine: A Safe and Cheap Form of Traditional Chinese Food Therapy" by Dai Yin-Fang, Liu Cheng-Jun, Ron Edwards and Gong Zhi-Mei

"Ginger, Garlic & Green Onions As Medicine: Curing Diseases the Chinese Way : A Safe and Cheap Form of Traditional Chinese Food Therapy" by Wang Fuchun and Duan Yuhua

"Dr. Chang's secrets of a thin body: Permanent weight loss no more cellulite complete healing diet" by Stephen T Chang

"Chinese diet for your health" by Henry C Lu

"Chinese health foods: Cook it yourself" by Henry C Lu

"A Taoist Cookbook: With Meditations Taken from the Laozi Daode Jing." by Michael Saso

"Tai Chi Diet: Food for Life." by Mike Symonds

"Your Way to Health With Foods and Herbs: Using the Wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine" by Zhang Yifang

"Managing Your Emotional Health Using Traditional Chinese Medicine: How Herbs, Natural Foods, and Acupressure Can Regulate and Harmonize Your Mind and Body" by Zhang Yifang

"Cooking With Chinese Herbs" by Terry Tan

"Chinese Medicinal Herbs: A Modern Edition of a Classic Sixteenth- Century Manual" by Li Shih-Chen


Henry123ifa (talk) 12:01, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

It was a good run[edit]

From 2002 till April 18, 2014, the old content lasted 12 years before it was blasted away. Twelve years were not too bad at all.  :-) Kowloonese (talk) 23:01, 27 September 2014 (UTC)

Some people couldn't tell the difference between a statement of fact, and a statement about others beliefs and what this article is actually about, e.g. the theory might be a load of pseudo-science, but having such an article gives us and understanding of that belief. Food therapy may have zero verifiable scientific basis, and of no health benefits what so ever, it doesn't stop people believing in it and acting as if it worked. Don't be sad, the old article is still there, and will always be there in the history, just so long as this article is not deleted. --KTo288 (talk) 17:27, 29 October 2014 (UTC)
I never understand this policy of blowing away info that don't have scientific proof. If you follow the same policy all articles on religions should be blown away. Chinese food therapy is a system that many Chinese people still practice. Just like Taichi and Yoga, the results and health benefits vary on individual basis and if you throw away info that are unproven yet, the knowledge is just buried unnecessarily. If you think the article is misleading, just clarify it and put in a disclaimer to emphasize there is no scientific proof yet. Chinese herbal medicine has been empirical over thousands of years. Only in recent decades, scholars are trying to find the scientific basis of why herbs have their medicinal results. Many universities in China, including The Chinese University of Hong Kong, are doing research on traditional Chinese herbal formulas. Such research is not easy because Chinese medicine believes in a balance formula, each prescription is a cocktail of multiple ingredients tailored to each person's condition. Such studies get very complex when so many variables are involved. Unlike Western medicine which only target the problem with one single active ingredient without regard of side effects. The basic principle behind Chinese food therapy is to eat healthy and adjust to your body's reaction to each type of food. The Yin Yang thing is not magic, it is just a system of classifying food based on body's reactions helps you choose a combination that reach a good balance. Kowloonese (talk) 21:20, 21 November 2014 (UTC)
Nevertheless, this ought to be in the same "pseudoscience" category that "Traditional Chinese medicine" is in. We do nobody any favours by suggesting that this rubbish works. 109.157.79.50 (talk) 01:43, 30 January 2015 (UTC)