Talk:Craig Steven Wright

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Contested deletion[edit]

This article should not be speedily deleted for lack of asserted importance because it is still being worked on.

Contested deletion[edit]

This article should not be speedily deleted for lack of asserted importance because this person could be worth more than 300 million dollars (U.S.). This is not just anyone. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Senoranandmanikutty (talkcontribs) 03:20, 9 December 2015 (UTC)

This article MUST BE DELETED[edit]

I have tried to delete known false information in this page and I explained why on the appropriate special page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Craig_Steven_Wright) but somebody always revert my change saying I did not exeplained why.

This news if now a know hoax, verified by http://motherboard.vice.com/read/satoshis-pgp-keys-are-probably-backdated-and-point-to-a-hoax. If you have not YOURSELF fresh information tahat a=your are able to confirm (not just a rumor copy/paste from a forum), please do not add any information known as FALSE.

If no one can find an error in the article above, then I'll add a 4th vote that this article should be deleted as it appears to have been started as the result of a hoax by a theological nut with no writings indicating he has Satoshi's level of skill in cryptography or the importance of smart contracts. Ywaz (talk) 17:00, 1 April 2016 (UTC)

Qualifications and references don't agree. Lacking References.[edit]

The article says he has a PhD in computer science but the given reference says his "PhD is in theology". (Note - Wiki article now corrected).

The article also says he is a "researcher at Charles Sturt University" but there is no reference or source.

There is no reference to having authoring or coauthored several books. One book is mentioned.

Based on the Wiki article his actual achievements seem to be "18 SANS Institute courses", "information systems manager", working on a incomplete PhD, and starting two failed private companies. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Aussiejohn (talkcontribs) 21:26, 13 December 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 2 external links on Craig Steven Wright. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 05:16, 1 April 2016 (UTC)

Two PhD's and Eight masters[edit]

http://cointelegraph.com/news/craig-wright-is-not-satoshi-nakamoto-the-myth-lives-on — Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.144.39.45 (talk) 21:53, 15 April 2016 (UTC)

Craig Steven Wright as founder Satoshi Nakamoto[edit]

News continues to break relating to Craig Steven Wright's claiming to be Satoshi Nakamoto. I suggest we keep this page as Wright claiming to be Nakamoto, until at least the dust settles. I changed the wiki entry to reflect his claim.

The Economist "Craig Steven Wright claims to be Satoshi Nakamoto. Is he?". Economist. 2 May 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2016. http://www.economist.com/news/briefings/21698061-craig-steven-wright-claims-be-satoshi-nakamoto-bitcoin

BBC "Craig Wright revealed as Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto". BBC. 2 May 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2016 http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36168863

This might develop later into a whole section entitled controversy, so until that happens suggest keeping it as "claims to be the creator" rather than "is the founder."

For what is worth, no technical person and no one in the cryptography field is believing him. So far the only two people he convinced are two bitcoin developers after a private demo. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Debman3 (talkcontribs) 16:27, 6 May 2016 (UTC)

Lead paragraph[edit]

I'm just going to throw this out there as a retired editor, the lead paragraph of this entry makes almost no sense. 63.118.185.98 (talk) 18:22, 2 May 2016 (UTC)

Bitcoin capitalization[edit]

There is no uniform convention for bitcoin capitalization. Some sources use Bitcoin, capitalized, to refer to the technology and network and bitcoin, lowercase, to refer to the unit of account.[1]

The Wall Street Journal,[2] The Chronicle of Higher Education[3], and the Oxford English Dictionary[4] advocate use of lowercase bitcoin in all cases. The same convention is used by The Economist[5] and the main Bitcoin article. The second of the cited articles and the Talk:Bitcoin archives explain the reasons why. I propose to adjust the capitalization in this article to use the same convention. Ladislav Mecir (talk) 16:16, 5 May 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ Bustillos, Maria (2 April 2013). "The Bitcoin Boom". The New Yorker. Condé Nast. Retrieved 22 December 2013. Standards vary, but there seems to be a consensus forming around Bitcoin, capitalized, for the system, the software, and the network it runs on, and bitcoin, lowercase, for the currency itself.
  2. ^ Vigna, Paul (3 March 2014). "BitBeat: Is It Bitcoin, or bitcoin? The Orthography of the Cryptography". WSJ. Retrieved 21 April 2014.
  3. ^ Metcalf, Allan (14 April 2014). "The latest style". Lingua Franca blog. The Chronicle of Higher Education (chronicle.com). Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  4. ^ "bitcoin". Oxford University Press. Retrieved 28 December 2014.
  5. ^ "Craig Steven Wright claims to be Satoshi Nakamoto. Is he?". Economist. 2 May 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2016.

CIA[edit]

Shall we mention that some believe he was a decoy sent from the CIA? 89.241.63.114 (talk) 20:17, 6 May 2016 (UTC)

Per WP:RUMOUR, speculation and rumour, even from reliable sources, are not appropriate encyclopedic content. Ladislav Mecir (talk) 09:14, 7 May 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 3 external links on Craig Steven Wright. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 01:40, 24 May 2017 (UTC)

Second Ph.D awarded[edit]

It appears to have been awarded at last in February 2017. "Craig S. Wright. “The quantification of information systems risk: A look at quantitative responses to information security issues” (doctoral thesis). Charles Sturt University, February 2017." You can find it in the CSU thesis search on "Craig Wright". Glancing through it, it's definitely written as badly as everything else Wright has written, pretty sure it's him - David Gerard (talk) 00:43, 29 May 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Craig Steven Wright. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 03:43, 14 August 2017 (UTC)

Claims he was satoshi. Did he?[edit]

"He has publicly said to be Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of bitcoin". This edit does not make any sense. Is it supposed to be "He has publicly said that he is Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of bitcoin"? Because I'm not sure he has ever done that and I cannot find it in the linked source. Even his blog post is a bit wishy washy about it.

I initially edited to read "He has publicly identified himself as pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin.", which I accept is a bit clunky, but it is the direct quote from the BBC news article.

On further examination of the video, his claim is "I was the main part of it [Satoshi Nakamoto], other people helped me." So maybe it should read:

"He has publicly identified himself as the main part of the team that created Bitcoin, also known by the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. Epideme12 (talk) 06:42, 21 February 2018 (UTC)

"Identified" seems to claim not just that he announced to be the main part of the team, but also that he was the main part of the team, which is not accepted as a fact by the majority of available sources. That is why I prefer to replace the term "identified" by something more subjective, such as "announced to be". Ladislav Mecir (talk) 10:49, 25 February 2018 (UTC)
Frankly, this is the correct occasion for the word "claimed" - he made a claim, one that is widely disbelieved - David Gerard (talk) 16:19, 25 February 2018 (UTC)

Did he actually claim to be Satoshi? He posted a blog which never explicitly said he was and in the BBC and economist stuff, all I can actually find his claim is "I was the main part of it [Satoshi Nakamoto], other people helped me."

115.187.165.37 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 10:52, 17 April 2018 (UTC)

Publications / Bibliography section?[edit]

Satoshi claims notwithstanding, Wright has some corpus of published literature out there. Any consensus on if we should have a section for published books/articles, instead of just in the body of the text? (Just ran across "DNS Security in Australia" - incidentally).

PvOberstein (talk) 07:09, 10 March 2018 (UTC)

Content move[edit]

I am moving a large block of content (mostly duplicate) from the Satoshi Nakamoto article to this talk page per WP:UNDUE weight to wright as Satoshi and leaving it here per WP:PRESERVE.

- On 9 December, only hours after Wired claimed Wright was Nakamoto, Wright's home in Gordon, New South Wales was raided by at least ten police officers. His business premises in Ryde, New South Wales were also searched by police. The Australian Federal Police stated they conducted searches to assist the Australian Taxation Office and that "This matter is unrelated to recent media reporting regarding the digital currency bitcoin."[1] According to a document released by Gizmodo alleged to be a transcript of a meeting between Wright and the ATO, he had been involved in a taxation dispute with them for several years.[2]

On 2 May 2016, Craig Wright posted on his blog publicly claiming to be Satoshi Nakamoto. In articles released on the same day, journalists from the BBC and The Economist stated that they saw Wright signing a message using the private key associated with the first bitcoin transaction.[3][4] During his BBC interview (which was also video recorded, aired and published by BBC News) Wright said:

Some people will believe, some people won't, and to tell you the truth, I don't really care. ... I didn't decide [to reveal my identity now]. People decided this matter for me. And they're making life difficult not for me but my friends, my family, my staff. ... They want to be private. They don't want all of this to affect them. And I don't want any of them to be impacted by this. None of it's true. There are lots of stories out there that have been made up. And I don't like it hurting those people I care about. So I am going to do this thing only once. And once only. I am going to come in front of a camera once. And I will never, ever, be on the camera ever again for any TV station, or any media, ever.

Wright's claim was supported by Jon Matonis (former director of the Bitcoin Foundation) and bitcoin developer Gavin Andresen, both of whom met Wright and witnessed a similar signing demonstration.[5]

On 4 May 2016, Wright made another post on his blog intimating his intentions to publish "a series of pieces that will lay the foundations for this extraordinary claim".[6][7] But the following day, he deleted all his blog posts and replaced them with a notice entitled "I'm Sorry", which read in part:

I believed that I could put the years of anonymity and hiding behind me. But, as the events of this week unfolded and I prepared to publish the proof of access to the earliest keys, I broke. I do not have the courage. I cannot.[8][9]

On Thursday 5 May 2016 shortly before closing his blog, Wright sent around an email link to a news story from an impostor site resembling SiliconAngle saying "Craig Wright faces criminal charges and serious jail time in UK". Wright stated that "I am the source of terrorist funds as bitcoin creator or I am a fraud to the world. At least a fraud is able to see his family. There is nothing I can do."[10].

In June 2016, the London Review of Books published an article by Andrew O'Hagan about the events, based on his book "The Secret Life: Three True Stories" in which O'Hagan spends several weeks with Wright at the request of Wright's public relations team; which, as revealed in the book, was set up as a result of a business deal between Wright and various individuals including Calvin Ayre after bitcoin was created. All of those involved in the described business deal seemed to agree that they wanted a significant event in human history to be documented by a writer with complete impartiality and freedom to investigate. O'Hagan was with Wright during the time of his various media interviews. O'Hagan also interviews Wright's wife, colleagues and many of the other people involved in his claims.[11][12][13] It also reveals that the Canadian company nTrust was behind Wright's claim made in May 2016 (perhaps referencing nTrust as being the same entity which created the public relations team for Wright). Further, O'Hagan suggests that Wright provided an invalid private key because he was legally unable to provide the valid one as a result of legal obligations agreed as part of a Seychelles trust deal previously reached. O'Hagan's book also corroborates the suggestion that both Wright and David Kleiman were the identies of the moniker "Satoshi Nakamoto".

Following O'Hagan's article, BBC journalist Rory Cellan-Jones (who interviewed Wright on camera for the BBC) wrote a follow up article citing O'Hagan's account as the possible reasons for Wright's apparent unwillingness to declare himself as Nakamoto:

To me, the key revelation is about this motivation.

He had told the BBC that he had not wanted to come out into the spotlight but needed to dispel damaging rumours affecting his family, friends and colleagues.

But O'Hagan shows us something rather different - a man under intense pressure from business associates who stood to profit from him if he could be shown to be Nakamoto.[14]

This is in reference to O'Hagan's firsthand account, which describes business associates as being furious when they learned that Wright had provided invalid proof (despite showing them valid proof privately) and for his failure to disclose the details of the Seychelles Trust deal which meant that he could neither provide said proof publicly or yet gain access to the bitcoin attributed to Nakamoto. Cellan-Jones concludes his article by expressing doubts about Wright but admits "It seems very likely he was involved, perhaps as part of a team that included Dave Kleiman and Hal Finney, the recipient of the first transaction with the currency."

The 2017 Netflix documentary titled Banking on Bitcoin concluded with an extract of Wright's 2016 interview with the BBC.[15][16]

On February 14, 2018 a suit against Wright (said to be living in London) for more than US$10bn was lodged in a Florida court on behalf of David Kleiman's estate, alleging that Wright has fraudulently appropriated Kleiman's share of the bitcoins that he and Kleiman mined together.[17][18] The suit sets out much detail of the collaboration between Wright and Kleiman, but does not speculate on whether they or either of them created bitcoin.[19]

New Liberty Dollar issuer Joseph VaughnPerling says he met Wright at a conference in Amsterdam three years before publication of the bitcoin white paper and that Wright introduced himself as Satoshi Nakamoto at that time.[20][21]

References

  1. ^ Hunt, Ellie; Farrell, Paul (9 December 2015). "Reported bitcoin 'founder' Craig Wright's home raided by Australian police". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 9 December 2015. Retrieved 9 December 2015.
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference gizmodo was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ "Creator of Bitcoin digital cash reveals identity – BBC News". BBC News. BBC. BBC. 2 May 2016. Archived from the original on 2 May 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2016.
  4. ^ "Craig Steven Wright claims to be Satoshi Nakamoto. Is he?". The Economist. 2 May 2016. Archived from the original on 2 May 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2016.
  5. ^ Satoshi, archived from the original on 5 May 2016, retrieved 7 May 2016
  6. ^ Alex Hern. "Bitcoin: Craig Wright promises new evidence to prove identity". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016.
  7. ^ Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Proof – Dr. Craig Wright BlogDr. Craig Wright Blog, archived from the original on 4 May 2016, retrieved 7 May 2016
  8. ^ "Dr. Craig Wright". Archived from the original on 7 May 2016.
  9. ^ Alex Hern. "Craig Wright U-turns on pledge to provide evidence he invented bitcoin". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 May 2016.
  10. ^ "Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain: Bitcoin, Blockchain, Ethereum & Smart Contracts" by David Gerard, pp. 67-78
  11. ^ Nakamoto, Andrew O’Hagan on the many lives of Satoshi (30 June 2016). "The Satoshi Affair". London Review of Books. pp. 7–28. ISSN 0260-9592. Archived from the original on 11 September 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  12. ^ "There could be a lot of money in claiming to have invented Bitoin". Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 28 June 2016.
  13. ^ O'Hagan, Andrew (6 June 2017). The Secret Life: Three True Stories. Faber & Faber. ISBN 9780571335855.
  14. ^ "Back to the Satoshi Nakamoto Bitcoin affair". Archived from the original on 7 December 2017.
  15. ^ Prisco, Giulio (1 September 2017). "Banking on Bitcoin Available on Netflix: A Good Intro to Bitcoin in Need of a Sequel". Bitcoin Magazine. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  16. ^ Christopher Cannucciari. "Banking on Bitcoin". Netflix.
  17. ^ Pearson, Jordan (February 27, 2018). "The Man Who Claimed to Invent Bitcoin Is Being Sued for $10 Billion". Motherboard. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  18. ^ Hern, Alex (February 27, 2018). "Self-proclaimed bitcoin 'creator' sued for $10bn". The Guardian. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  19. ^ "Ira Kleiman v. Craig Wright". United States District Court, Southern District of Florida. February 14, 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  20. ^ "Satoshi Saga Continues: Tulip Trust Trustee Expected to Appear by September 19, Says Joseph VaughnPerling" by Aaron van Wirdum Staff Writer, Bitcoin magazine, May 5, 2016 1:03 PM EST
  21. ^ Twitter communication with Brian Cohen, 2 May 2016

If you have any comments, please ping me. Thanks! Jtbobwaysf (talk) 08:43, 16 July 2018 (UTC)

+1 - David Gerard (talk) 10:26, 16 July 2018 (UTC)

Source checks, edits[edit]

I cut the second para of the intro - it was fine detail that was already covered in the body, and not suitable for the intro summary of an article.

I cut a pile of primary sources and non-RS sources - if these details aren't in RSes, they're not notable enough to mention in a BLP (this is an encyclopedia article, not a resume). The article needs serious going-over - it's still got a ton of rubbish sources in it. - David Gerard (talk) 11:50, 8 December 2018 (UTC)

The hoax claim in the lead section[edit]

The hoax claim in the lead section introduced by 84percent is

He has publicly claimed to be the main part of the team that created bitcoin, and the identity behind the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. These claims are widely regarded as a hoax.[1][2][3][4]

Note, however, that the source[1] uses the "hoax" term with a "probably" reservation meaning that it does not say the claim is a hoax, the source[2] mentions that "the most likely answer to this mystery is that Craig Wright is the inventor of Bitcoin, and that the second most likely answer is that he’s staged an elaborate, strange and long-planned hoax.", i.e. it does not say that the claim is a hoax, the source[3] just asks whether the claim is true or whether it is a hoax and finally, the source[4] also says things such as "So were Andresen, the Economist, and other observers tricked by the digital equivalent of a magic trick? No one other than Wright knows for sure.", not saying that the claim actually was a hoax, just warning that the readers should be skeptical. Therefore, the formulation used by 84percent in the lead section is a misrepresentation of the sources. Ladislav Mecir (talk) 09:09, 9 April 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ a b Jeong, Sarah (2015-12-09). "Satoshi's PGP Keys Are Probably Backdated and Point to a Hoax". Motherboard. Retrieved 2019-04-07.
  2. ^ a b Bustillos, Maria (2015-12-11). "The Bizarre Saga of Craig Wright, the Latest "Inventor of Bitcoin"". ISSN 0028-792X. Retrieved 2019-04-07.
  3. ^ a b Foley, Hannah Francis and Rebecca (2015-12-11). "Craig Steven Wright: Did this 'daggy dad' from Sydney really invent Bitcoin?". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2019-04-07.
  4. ^ a b Lee, Timothy B. (2016-05-02). "Craig Wright really wants you to think he invented Bitcoin. Don't believe him". Vox. Retrieved 2019-04-07.
Hi Ladislav Mecir. Thanks for the details. I admit I had a lapse in judgement with some of the older and less reliable sources, which I can see now have not all directly labeled the statements a hoax. I've cleaned that up with newer sources that are unambiguous about the fact that Craig Wright's claims are indeed widely regarded as a hoax. The only old source the remains from the above list is the 2015 article by Sarah Jeong.
Wired:[1] "Since then, however, three new inconsistencies have cast doubt on that evidence, and added weight to the "hoax" side of the scale" and "The two major holes in Wright's resume that have come to light since, however, point to a hoaxer who may have planted clues of his purported bitcoin creation". The Next Web:[2] "[...] although subsequent reporting raised serious concerns that his claims were part of an elaborate hoax to impersonate Bitcoin‘s mysterious creator". The Australian:[3] "Australian authorities are understood to firmly believe Mr Wright is not the creator of Bitcoin and that he may have created the hoax to distract from his tax issues." Motherboard:[4] "Satoshi's PGP Keys Are Probably Backdated and Point to a Hoax". Motherboard[5] says Vitalik Buterin called him a "fraud" onstage a large blockchain conference, to which the audience applauded; while hoaxter is not exactly synonymous with fraudster (the latter is worse), the fact that the audience "went wild" after Buterin ousted him proves that the hoax regard is not merely a journalist bias. This one may not be appropriate however because of WP:SYNTH. Finally, Forbes:[6] "Time To Call A Hoax?", and "[...] it's becoming increasingly likely the media madness of this week was the result of a hoax."  84percent (talk) 10:11, 9 April 2019 (UTC)
@84percent: "I admit I had a lapse in judgement..." – actually, you still do not judge the sources correctly. None of the sources confirms that "it is widely regarded as a hoax". None of the sources even confirms that it regards it as a hoax, they just see such an alternative as having some probability or likelihood, besides the alternative that Wright is Satoshi Nakamoto. That is why the best alternative still remains to revert the formulation to WP:STATUSQUO. Ladislav Mecir (talk) 11:24, 10 April 2019 (UTC)
@Ladislav Mecir: What wording exactly are you suggesting? I understand your points. Do you think it would be satisfactory to replace "a hoax" with "a possible hoax" and leave the sentence intact otherwise? 84percent (talk) 11:38, 10 April 2019 (UTC)
I wouldn't replace it. Mecir just tried to remove one reference that documents extensively the perception of Wright as a fake, but that doesn't use the precise word "hoax". But "hoax" is a perfectly good, accurate and correctly-communicating word for what Wright is extensively documented as having attempted - David Gerard (talk) 08:05, 11 April 2019 (UTC)
84percent, the WP:STATUSQUO version, which, as far as I remember, was a result of an extensive discussion I did not take part in is

He has publicly identified himself as the main part of the team that created bitcoin, and has stated he is the identity behind the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. This statement has been widely regarded with scepticism.

The sources mention a hoax as one of the probable alternatives, mentioning the possibility that Wright is Satoshi Nakamoto as the other. Knowing that there was a consensus on the status quo wording, as opposed to the present misrepresentation of the sources, we could very well revert to the status quo without misrepresenting the sources, in fact. Another variant of the text that would not misrepresent the cited sources would be to replace "a hoax" with "a possible hoax" and leave the sentence intact otherwise. I do not think we shoud misrepresent the cited sources so much as to say that they claim that the statement was a hoax when they clearly mention that as just one of the possible alternatives. Ladislav Mecir (talk) 09:52, 11 April 2019 (UTC)
@Ladislav Mecir: I've just made the edit for the latter ("a possible hoax" with the rest intact).

Lede is WP:OVERCITE and appears to be a WP:BLP violation. If this guy is a hoax or not might be fun for us to debate on the talk page, but seems out of line for a BLP article. Thanks Jtbobwaysf (talk) 10:16, 18 April 2019 (UTC)

Do you have a proposal? Claiming to be Satoshi Nakamoto is what Craig Wright is most notable for. If you hear his name, the first thing that comes to mind is "Satoshi Nakamoto" or (much more often) "hoax". 84percent (talk) 10:41, 18 April 2019 (UTC)
Given the arguments over this claim, it probably does need to be cited to that extent. And it's not a BLP violation if it's in a ton of RSes - what bit in particular are you claiming appears to be a BLP violation? - David Gerard (talk) 14:44, 18 April 2019 (UTC)

Extended confirmed protection, 1 week[edit]

I realise there's strong feelings on Wright, but we can't set his occupation to "conman" in the text. Per WP:BLPADMINS, I've put this on ECP for a week. I must note that I've been editing and opining on "hoax" versus "possible hoax" myself, so other admins should feel free to remove this if they feel it's inappropriate. Or, indeed, extend it - David Gerard (talk) 13:27, 12 April 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Greenberg, Andy (2015-12-11). "New Clues Suggest Craig Wright, Suspected Bitcoin Creator, May Be a Hoaxer". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Retrieved 2019-04-09.
  2. ^ Perez, Yessi Bello (2019-03-18). "Inside Craig Wright's blockchain patent 'empire'". Hard Fork | The Next Web. Retrieved 2019-04-09.
  3. ^ "ATO probes Bitcoin 'creator'". www.theaustralian.com.au. 2016-01-20. Retrieved 2019-04-09.
  4. ^ Jeong, Sarah (2015-12-09). "Satoshi's PGP Keys Are Probably Backdated and Point to a Hoax". Motherboard. Retrieved 2019-04-07.
  5. ^ Pearson, Jordan; Maiberg, Emanuel (2018-05-23). "Craig Wright Isn't Mad, He's Actually Laughing After Public Beef at Blockchain Conference". Motherboard. Retrieved 2019-04-09.
  6. ^ Fox-Brewster, Thomas. "Time To Call A Hoax? Inconsistencies On 'Probable' Bitcoin Creator's PhD And Supercomputers Revealed". Forbes. Retrieved 2019-04-09.

Craig Wright Satoshi legal letters, Bitcoin SV delisting[edit]

Mainstream RS coverage: FT, Bloomberg - any others? This may rate mention - David Gerard (talk) 13:02, 19 April 2019 (UTC)

I came here to update the page, specifically for that reason. The trouble - there is so much media (crypto and mainstream) coverage, difficult to describe all the matters in a wikipedia-friendly style.

Copyright issue[edit]

There seems to be an attempt to misrepresent this information in the article. Yes, Craig Wright submitted an application for registration. However, the US copyright office doesn't recognize Wright as Satoshi, it just means he was able to fill the forms and pay a nominal amount of money. There was no determination of truth made. In fact, the copyright office explicitly put out a press release to clarify this: https://www.copyright.gov/press-media-info/press-updates.html?loclr=twcop. Making a note here as I suspect more attempts to manipulate the article. --Molochmeditates (talk) 03:04, 23 May 2019 (UTC)

That press release is golden. (It started as an email to crypto news site Decrypt; I'm told the Copyright Office put it up as a press release after Decrypt asked them to, presumably as Decrypt was wary of defamation risk.) - David Gerard (talk) 15:35, 23 May 2019 (UTC)

Citizenship[edit]

Hello, Molochmeditates reverted my change about his citizenship. In my reference I included a link to an OFFICIAL US government site where it was stated that he is an Antiguan and Barbudan citizen. You can find it here. On the line "Authorship on Application" there is written "Citizenship: Antigua and Barbuda.". There are also lots of people in the cryptocurrency space who acquired this citizenship (You can buy the citizenship for $250k I think) like Roger Ver and Calvin Ayre. Emil Engler (talk) 14:16, 23 May 2019 (UTC)

That's a site where Wright claimed it. See the Copyright Office press release above - David Gerard (talk) 15:19, 23 May 2019 (UTC)
David above answered your question. Please also see my revert summary the next time, it should have the information you need to determine why your edit was reverted. --Molochmeditates (talk) 15:23, 23 May 2019 (UTC)