Talk:Danu (Irish goddess)

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Other place-names[edit]

  • A Icelandic friend interested in celtic mythology told me about the connection between Danu and London. Regards Gangleri | [//

/w/index.php?title=User_talk:Gangleri&action=history Th] | T 20:34, 2005 Mar 4 (UTC)

Would you like to enlarge on that? Rather tantalising titbit to offer! ThePeg 19:28, 7 April 2007 (UTC)


There are some unsourced things in here that strike me as modern inventions, such as: "She is depicted, usually, with long flowing raven black hair, emerald green eyes with fair skin and fine features. Accompanied by a fairy, usually a phooka," Could the original editors of this piece do something about that, or we'll have to put citation needed tags on this. --Kathryn NicDhàna 17:59, 13 May 2006 (UTC)

Good grief. Turn your back for a second and the articles start filling up with gibberish. The phrase "Irish Celt lore" rings alarm bells immediately. Lir (an Irish mythological character) being the son of Beli (a Welsh mythological character) - Aaargh! And then the clincher - "Celtic Wiccan circles". Another neo-pagan who can't tell the difference between genuine ancient material and the stuff they've made up. I wouldn't bother with a citation tag, I'm just going to remove the paragraph. --Nicknack009 19:29, 13 May 2006 (UTC)
Well, yeah, I was trying to be polite <g>. I was certain any "source" for that would be a mass-market, occult-press paperback, or "that's what my high priestess told me." You're right to just delete it. --Kathryn NicDhàna 20:33, 13 May 2006 (UTC)
Polite? What's that? I notice from your user-page your a neo-pagan yourself, but as you're insisting on valid sources you're obviously not one of the ones that wind me up so much, so assume a little "present company excepted" in my last comment. I've no problems with people constructing (or reconstructing) their own religions, so long as, in forums like this, they know to distinguish between what's reconstructed and what's not.--Nicknack009 21:43, 13 May 2006 (UTC)
No need to apologize; I agree with you completely. One of the main tenets of the tradition I belong to is to always distinguish between solid research and personal inspiration. And fantasy passed off as fact is right out. True, I am a Pagan, as I am a polytheist, and definitely not a member of any of the Big Three religions. And technically I am a "neo-" as there simply is no unbroken, Celtic polytheistic tradition in existence, so any polytheism practiced now is a new religious movement. But the Neopagan community just has too much baggage now - fantasy passed off as fact, cultural misappropriation, and other unsavory things I simply cannot support - so I no longer identify as part of it. I am one of those Polytheistic reconstructionist types, specifically, CR. We're quite different from the Wiccans and fluffy Neopagans. Or at least, we do our best to be. --Kathryn NicDhàna 22:08, 13 May 2006 (UTC)
Pagan schisms? Heh heh. Reminds me of the Celtic paganism that Pat Mills created in Sláine, if you've ever read that. One all-powerful deity (the Goddess), a mortal, sacrificial god (the Horned God), no other good deities, one bad one (Crom Cruach), and a hero who's concerned with establishing doctrinal correctness. He hasn't really moved as far from Christianity as he likes to think. Personally, I'm a complete heathen - I just like the stories. --Nicknack009 22:30, 13 May 2006 (UTC)
Oh, get a dozen Pagans in a room and you have at least that many schisms. Haven't read Sláine, but, uh, no that's not Celtic (as I know you know). It's pretty damn close to what many Wiccans believe, though. It's awful when people try to pass that stuff off as Celtic... and lots of Americans in particular have been ignorant enough to buy it. There's a lot of work to be done on that front, but in the fifteen-twenty years I've been working on it, things are slowly improving. In some sectors, anyway. But perhaps I see a biased, more literate sample, as now and then others point me to crap on the internet that is more ignorant than ever. I can't even go near the general Pagan lists anymore, it's just too sad. And it pisses me off to see it encroach on Wikipedia. Grrrrr. --Kathryn NicDhàna 03:11, 14 May 2006 (UTC)

Shouldn't the name be Danú.[edit]

Shouldn't the name (and possibly the article's title) be Danú spelt with a fada. At the very least, there should be a mention of it in the first line with the names.--Dmol (talk) 19:38, 13 July 2008 (UTC)

Do you have a source that advocates that spelling? I've never seen it before. As I understand it, a final u in Old Irish represents a schwa, so OI Danu would be pronounced /'danə/, hence the later spelling Dana. Similarly, OI Derdriu is pronounced more or less the same as modern Deirdre. --Nicknack009 (talk) 13:14, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

There is a statue entitled Danú near Rathmore in County Kerry. But I've just noticed how hard it is to find any supporting evidence for this spelling. The only other mention is the Irish band that spell it Danú. Everything else seems to be without the fada.--Dmol (talk) 20:50, 18 July 2008 (UTC)

Terminal "-u"/"-iu" in old Irish was not pronounced long.Murchadh (talk) 20:32, 21 December 2009 (UTC)

What's up with the rivers?[edit]

Both this and lays claim to the name of the Danube river. —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 06:04, 4 October 2009 (UTC)

See Proto-Indo-European language. -- (talk) 16:45, 24 November 2009 (UTC)
see also the Tribe of Dan, and also the alternate name for achaian macedonians, Danaan. (talk) 11:24, 14 December 2015 (UTC)


There is not any reliable reference that "Da-mater" was a water goddess. (talk) 11:06, 12 October 2010 (UTC)


There is not any reliable reference that "Da-mater" was a water goddess. (talk) 11:07, 12 October 2010 (UTC)


Are there any relevant sources for connecting Danu with Brigantia/Brigid? as far as my studies wen at the time I haven't seen any hint pointing to this connection. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rotheron (talkcontribs) 09:23, 5 November 2012 (UTC)

Article needs a re-write[edit]

This article is in pretty rough shape and contains a whole lot of spurious and out-of-date information. In fact, there is very little information in medieval Irish literature about *Danu (I believe this nominative form name is not even attested, only the genitive Danann/Donann); much of what people "know" about the goddess comes from modern scholars and most of it is highly speculative. I will start touching it up when I have the time.Cagwinn (talk) 15:28, 3 June 2014 (UTC)