Talk:Franz Grillparzer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search


This article need radical revision[edit]

Some of it is ludicrous for an encyclopaedia and reads like a school essay. What does "... all of them indicating a strong and independent spirit, not invariably just" even mean, especially with no examples or clarification?

Das Kloster bei Sendomir?[edit]

This article fails to mention at least one of Grillparzer's works: Das Kloster bei Sendomir. I would add it in, but I don't feel expert enough to do it myself. Perhaps mentioning it next to Der arme Spielmann would make sense since that and Das Kloster bei Sendomir are both Novelle from Grillparzer -- the only two I know of (again, I'm no expert). I think it was first published in the "Schreyvogel Taschenbuch 'Aglaja'" in 1828, although I've also read something about it being published in 1827 (I think it was written in some sketched out form for some years prior), so someone might want to verify this.

Kyledr (talk) 20:49, 25 July 2008 (UTC)

I have added in the story listed as being written/published in 1827. The German article lists Das Kloster bei Sendomir as being published in 1827; in the back of my Reclam-Verlag edition, it says: "The story first appeared in the Taschenbuch 'Aglaja' for the year 1828, edited by Joseph Schreyvogel, Vienna: J.B. Wallishausser, 1827." Similar to how one would buy a 2010 calendar at the end of 2009, apparently one would buy the 1828 Taschenbuch at the end of 1827. In the afterward of the Reclam-Verlag edition, it gives a brief biographical sketch of Grillparzer in which it mentions that the story was "essentially complete" by autumn of 1827. Matt (talk) 03:14, 29 December 2009 (UTC)

[edit]

I have added information from the German article. I will continue to work on this over the next few days.

I have added information from the German article. I will continue to work on this over the next few days.

poetic but unencyclopedic language[edit]

I realize this is an article about a writer who wrote dramas. Still, sentences such as Whatever the cause may have been, the poet was plunged into an abyss of misery and despair to which his diary bears heartrending witness; his sufferings found poetic expression in the fine cycle of poems bearing the significant title Tristia ex Ponto appear to be a bit unencyclopedic. Can't we just say he was really bummed out? Volunteer Marek (talk) 21:32, 19 November 2010 (UTC)

Indeed. It reads like a high school student's essay. What on earth does "... all of them indicating a strong and independent spirit, not invariably just ..." even mean? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2.97.125.10 (talk) 11:41, 24 January 2015 (UTC)

Piece is lacking in subjectivity.[edit]

The English-language piece has a strong tendify to glorify Grillparzer's work without making clear the reception of his work at the time. The German-language article is much better-written, balanced, and more informative. Someone should translate it into English. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.17.206.140 (talk) 00:01, 18 March 2011 (UTC)

Maybe you mean 'lacking in objectivity'. This is a very poor article for an encyclopaedia.