Talk:Geography of antisemitism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Jewish history (Rated List-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Jewish history, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Jewish history on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Start[edit]

Moved from Anti-Semitism, as it was too big. However now that you can read it, it needs help.Greroja 21:51, 24 August 2006 (UTC)

Antisemitism in Spain[edit]

Minor correction (I don't know where to put this):(Granada was under Moorish, not Christian, control from 711 to 1492. It was the last Iberian region to be "reconquered", by the so-called Catholic monarchs, in 1492.

Unsourced on antiSemitism in Africa[edit]

Very informative to include in the article (encyclopediac, but wasn't able to find sources immediately, I would love others to help me out). But, this is well circulated in the world press on the huge problem of antisemitism is widespread in Africa. Here are the removed posts below and bear with me this isn't what I believe, nor want to promote. Antisemitism in Subsaharan Africa has gone on for over 40 years, partially from or under authoritanian dictators like Idi Amin of Uganda. According to some biographers, Idi Amin was viciously antisemitic. "Everytime someone mentions Jews around Amin, he turns angry and foams in the mouth, and rant about the Jews manipulated his people". I want to point out some Rastafarian groups and some Black Muslim activists are notably antisemitic, and we've heard of their speeches associated both Jews and whites as "blue eyed devils", that black Africans are "the true Hebrews" or the Egyptians are Africans/Nubians, not Caucasians, can't be taken seriously by academia and are politically motivated claims. + 63.3.14.2 04:02, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

Africa[edit]

Jews are sparse in number in sub-saharan Africa, except for enclaves of historical Jewish sects in Ethiopia, the Falashas, who traced their roots to the peoples of Canaan for 3,000 years and most of the Falasha applied for migration permits into Israel since the 1970's. Once there are communities home to thousands and/or tens of thousands of Jews each in Kenya, Sudan, Uganda and Zaire (the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and in Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe had a thriving Jewish community of Ashkenazi origin. By 1980, nearly all of Africa's Jewish population outside of South Africa have left the continent, while European and Sephardic (Middle Eastern) Jews left for Israel, while a few others went to Europe or North America. The continent's massive poverty rates and political turmoil in the late 20th century led to some African national leaders began to blame Jews and used antisemitism to justify the problems of their countries, they believed, "are operated by a conspiracy against the African race". Antisemitism in Africa includes false rumors and allegations that the AIDS pandemic, which severely affects subsaharan Africa than anywhere on earth (despite the disease affects every continent and every race), was bioengineered by either the US, the United Nations or "the Jews" in a plot to exterminate millions of black Africans and the disease is seriously damaging the countries, is a part of the "Jewish" or "white Europeans' maneuvers against Africa" or a continuous practice of "racial genocide". African nations are prone to accept unreliable antisemitic reports and revisionist history on slavery of black Africans to the new world was in due part of "Jewish merchants working for European colonial masters", also inflames the unsupported antisemitic rhetoric. According to social scientists, theories like antisemitism are appealing to some impoverished and downtrodden people without enough education to know the "Jewish conspiracy" myth is false and unprovable. [citation needed]

South Africa[edit]

Farther south are substantially large communities of Jews in South Africa, either of Sephardic and Ashkenazic origins, the majority of them live in urban areas like Cape Town and Johannesburg, where up to 70,000 South African Jews live in socioeconomically mobile and fairly non-oppressed lives. The state of Israel had great diplomatic relations with South Africa and the two were in an alliance against Soviet communism, even in the time (1950's and 1960's) when Apartheid, the official race segregation system, was enforced as the law in that country. However, both far-right white Apartheid supporters and far-left black African nationalists accused South African Jews for their misfortunes (it's been claimed on some post-1945 Apartheid legislation is closely similar to the 1930's Nuremberg race laws, due to the "semi-fascist" affiliation of the Nationalist Party ruled South Africa in most of the 20th century), and Jews received inconclusive blame for grave economic damage of the nations of the African continent. These opposition political groups used or propagated classic antisemitic stereotypes of Jews as "liberals" or "seditious" to the South African government, who are accused to thwarted the end of Apartheid in the early 1990's. There was a wave of white South African emigres, including most of the Jewish minority once ranged over 150,000 in the 1980's, to Europe or North America, and many other South African Jews found new homes in Israel. South African Jews were widely concerned on political crises and economic insecurity in the country in the past two decades, a byproduct brought on by huge racial disparities and inequalities of Apartheid. [citation needed] >>

Antisemitism in Asia[edit]

Also the updated edits on antisemitism in Asia are deleted, while the parts on antisemitism in China and India are repeatedly deleted or re-edited for someones' satisfaction. I don't know on the information on the situation of antisemitism in China or India, was unsourced or violated wikipedia rules, but it has to stop! Here are these posts below, and again I don't want to look like I'm making Africans, (east or south) Asians or whoever else are "anti-semites"...not true! Antisemitism is worldwide and every race/ religion can have prejudices towards other peoples, such as the Jews. The anti-zionist movement tries to make an issue out of Israel's existence as a "white/western colony" of "American imperialist interests" established over Arab/Islamic lands of the "third world" appeals to some impoverished and downtrodden people. The article covered the anti-Semitic hate groups in north America (the US and Canada, perhaps to include the whole continent)...but what about reports of antisemitism in the Jewish community of Australia? +63.3.14.2 04:02, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

East Asia[edit]

Historically, the Jewish population was miniscule and sparsely dispersed across the Asian continent. The earliest record of Jews and Judaism in east Asia were trade merchants who took the Silk Road to a number of cities in central China in the 2nd century AD. (see History of the Jews in China) Antisemitism is evident in lesser but noticable forms in China, India, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore and Southeast Asia, wherever a brief history of small Jewish inhabitation is documented. Today, a small population of practicing Jews continue to live in east Asia. The usual culprits of the primarily "New antisemitism" movement in Asia belonged to the far-left, nationalist and anti-Zionist activists. Some governments are openly hostile to the presence of Jews and white Europeans, a legacy of colonialism in Asia during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Communist China and other east Asian countries have strained relations with the state of Israel for over half a century. However, antisemitism in both political and religious forms are very low in India, home to the Bene Israel sect of Judaism for over 1,500 years and Indian society shown further tolerance of Judaism than in medieval Europe and the Muslim world. The same is true for the rest of Asia outside of Russia and the Middle East, on a more positive reaction by most east Asians in the matter of Judaism and with east Asian religions lived aside each other for thousands of years. [citation needed]

Japan[edit]

Originally Japan, with no Jewish population, had no anti-Semitism, however, Nazi ideology and propaganda left its influence on Japan during World War II, and the Protocols of the Elders of Zion were subsequently translated into Japanese. Today, anti-Semitism and belief in Jewish manipulation of Japan and the world remains despite the small size of the Jewish community in Japan. Books about Jewish conspiracies are best sellers. According to a 1988 survey, 8% of Japanese had read one of these books.[1] In recent years, the rise of the National Socialist Japanese Workers and Welfare Party is an anti-Semitic and neo-Nazi force to reckon with in the history of global antisemitism movements. [citation needed] According to the Israeli Defense Forces, Israeli disaster relief troops arrived in Kobe after the 1995 earthquake when international assistance arrived to guard and repair the devastated city. It was reported that Israeli troops were harassed and threatened by some of Kobe's residents with malicious intent, even a few refused to accept emergency supplies from Israeli medical staff and antisemitism may be the cause of these conflicts. [citation needed]

References

  1. ^ Japanese Attitudes Towards Jews Accessed October 8, 2006

Historic & Current?[edit]

I'm confused about what is current and historic, and I moved Turkey from historic to current, but why is this distinction even drawn? Wouldn't a flat structure make more sense and be easier to maintain? --Merzul 18:52, 8 February 2007 (UTC)

FYI, I recommend to move the segments on Egypt, Libya and Morocco to Africa. The two countries are not located in the Asian continent, unless you could rename it to Asia and the Middle East (or separate Middle Eastern countries to have it's own section dealing with an amount of fervent antisemitism in Arab countries and the Muslim world). Geographically incorrect, but let's also expand the evidence of historic and current anti-semitism in Asia, Africa, and North and Latin America. 63.3.14.2 06:49, 13 February 2007 (UTC)

Antisemitism in North America[edit]

Antisemistism in Canada[edit]

Would it make sense to make a page about antisemitism in Canada? I believe that at the time of the Second World War there is a fair bit of information pertaining to the topic - for instance the refusal to admit Jewish refugees on the St. Louis due to the antisemitic sentiments of the Minister of Immigration of the time //etc// As well, immigration policies from Confederation on tended to discriminate against Jewish people (as well as other groups)... --CdnStar 03:25, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

If you can find the sources, it makes sense.--Sefringle 03:46, 25 February 2007 (UTC)
    • Thanks - that'll give me something to do this week, I know I have a few sources already. Thanks --CdnStar 04:59, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

Russia[edit]

The majority of Russia is mainly in Asia, so I think it is better to have Russia in the Asia section.--Sefringle 21:28, 1 March 2007 (UTC)

The history of Jews in Russia is overwhelmingly associated with Russia's European part. United Nations list Russia as an European country [1], so the case is clear I think. M0RD00R 07:32, 17 March 2007 (UTC)
OK that clears it up. Thanks--Sefringle 07:33, 17 March 2007 (UTC)
You're welcome. M0RD00R 07:41, 17 March 2007 (UTC)

US section[edit]

I saw that the Jimmy Carter stuff was removed so I did the same for Mel Gibson. It seems that the section has more of an historical overtone. The Mel stuff is still pretty current. Maybe there are better examples like the Faraakan(sp) mention? Anyways--Tom 13:10, 3 July 2007 (UTC)

The section on private liberal arts universities and medical and dental schools employing Numerus clausus seems to need citations. Thanks, --Tom 18:05, 9 August 2007 (UTC)

Antisemitism in Israel[edit]

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/6985808.stm. May be worth a section, if more sources preferably for other notable incidents can be found. —AldeBaer 16:32, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

Indian anti-semitism[edit]

This section is full of POV and unsubstantiated sentences. It is said here that "Anti-semitism first came to India with the Portuguese" and "There have been no antisemitic incidents from the Hindu majority in India in the nearly 3-millennium history of Indian Jewry". This section was clearly written by Hindu ultra-nationalists and adds nothing of encyclopedic value. 89.155.101.155 (talk) 22:18, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

Antisemitism in Britain & Ireland[edit]

I'm astonished that there is not a section on this page about Antisemitism in the United Kingdom, when there is for so many countries around the world. Or Ireland either. There is a hugely significant history of antisemitism in these countries (& still a culture of antisemitism in some areas of society). I checked the Wikipedia entry for History of Jews in England, & there isn't really very much there on antisemitism either - or at least there is a lot of relevant info missed out. Seems like a major subject has been glossed over. - 86.133.3.140 (talk) 01:35, 8 February 2008 (UTC)

Not "hugely significant" in Ireland, as numbers were very small. A "pogrom" in 1907 in Limerick, whipped up by a priest, not involving educated people. Too little help for Jewish genocide refugees after 1945 (but how many Darfurians are being welcomed into Israel in 2008?). On the other hand, the most famous novel in Irish literature in the past century, Ulysses by James Joyce, has an Irish-Jewish protagonist, Leopold Bloom.86.42.197.252 (talk) 15:23, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

Image copyright problem with Image:KKK holocaust a zionist hoax.jpg[edit]

The image Image:KKK holocaust a zionist hoax.jpg is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

  • That there is a non-free use rationale on the image's description page for the use in this article.
  • That this article is linked to from the image description page.

This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --23:05, 17 September 2008 (UTC)

RfC[edit]

Light bulb iconBAn RfC: Which descriptor, if any, can be added in front of Southern Poverty Law Center when referenced in other articles? has been posted at the Southern Poverty Law Center talk page. Your participation is welcomed. – MrX 16:23, 22 September 2012 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:3D Test of Antisemitism which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 10:30, 28 August 2014 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Geography of antisemitism. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 14:02, 9 January 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 5 external links on Geography of antisemitism. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 05:03, 13 October 2017 (UTC)

External links modified (January 2018)[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 2 external links on Geography of antisemitism. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete the "External links modified" sections if they want, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 15 July 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 20:49, 25 January 2018 (UTC)

Africa : Cameroon section. Is this a joke? Absolutely terrible![edit]

This article is a mess and needs to clarify the scope of this article. As it stand at the moment, it seems to me that if someone from any country has made an antisemitic remark then his/her country is judged antisemitic rather than the individual, coupled with real state law/system sanctioned antisemitism in any given country. For example under Cameroon, just because a deputy justice minister made an alleged antisemitic canard then the whole country is antisemitic? Really! This is just foolish and doesn't really address the topic. The scope of this article needs to be defined rather than adopting this shopping list. Wikipedia is not a shopping list.

In 2019, deputy justice minister Jean de Dieu Momo advanced an antisemitic canard during prime time on Cameroon Radio Television, and suggested that Jewish people had brought the holocaust upon themselves.[1][2]

Tamsier (talk) 10:03, 14 March 2019 (UTC)

Amtisemitism in Israel[edit]

Israel is missing. Zezen (talk) 03:48, 29 May 2019 (UTC)

  1. ^ "Cameroon minister sparks fury by saying 'arrogant' Jews brought on Holocaust". The Independent. 7 February 2019.
  2. ^ "Cameroon goment wash hand from Jean de Dieu Momo e comments". 5 February 2019 – via www.bbc.com.