Talk:Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zagreb

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Primacy?[edit]

There was a sentence on the Josip Bozanić page for a while that was removed as "not true" which said:

As Zagreb archbishop, Bozanić also serves as Primate of Croatia

What is the official stance? --Joy [shallot] (talk) 14:09, 27 January 2010 (UTC)

Croatia has no primate as far as I know. The Archbishop of Zagreb is often treated similarly to the primates of other countries, because as Croatia's only Cardinal he is the highest ranking clergy in the country. The lack of a primate makes sense: a hundred years ago Zagreb and Zadar were the only archdioceses within the modern RH's borders, and neither was in any position to claim primacy. With Zadar gifted to Italy after WWI, this left Dalmatia's metropolitan see in another country! The archbishops of Zagreb and Sarajevo became the senior clergy in the state, with Zagreb taking precedent due to its size and history. The archbishops of Zagreb became heads of the Bishops' conferences during the monarchy, fascism, and communism. This made the archbishop of Zagreb a leading figure (with many claims that he is the "head of the Church in Croatia"), but no official primacy has ever been given as far as I am aware.
With that said, .hr wiki claims that Split historically held such a primacy. Due to Split's later humble ecclesiastical history, it was likely not retained.--Thewanderer (talk) 15:21, 27 January 2010 (UTC)