Talk:Secret decoder ring

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Content from decoders[edit]

Here is the content from the decoders article. I changed it into a redirect to decoder. This material was written almost entirely by 4.247.71.29. If it is merged into this article, I suggest that be put in the edit summary.

"Although several different items are called "decoders," in the popular mind, these are primarily premiums from old radio and television shows, which sent out messages to be deciphered by their audiences.

The first widespread decoders were issued by Ovaltine Foods (the Wander Company) in 1935 for the radio show they sponsored, Little Orphan Annie This was called a Radio Orphan Annie (ROA) Secret Society Decoder Pin. Once a week, at the close of the show, a "secret message" was sent in cipher that would provide a preview for the next episode of the show, which was a serial. ROA Secret Society Decoder Pins were issued annually throiugh 1940, when Ovaltine dropped sponsorship of the program. An Urban Legend is that one of the secret messages was, "Be sure to drink your Ovaltine," but that never took place.

The second series of decoders was associated with the Captain Midnight radio show. These were called Code-O-Graphs, and were used the same way as the ROA decoder pins. They were offered annually from 1941 through 1949, with a two-year hiatus during World War II, where materials restruictions prevented any being manufactured for the 1943 and 1944 seasons.

Although Little Orphan Annie and Captain Midnight were the primasry radio programs to use decoders, other programs issued them as well. These include Tom Mix Ralston Straight Shooters, Tennessee Jed, and Red Ryder. The radio show, Sky King, had a radio premium that included a decoder element, but this was never used to decipher incoming messages from broadcasts.

Another legend from radio days is the "Secret Decoder Ring." No radio program ever offered such a premium, but many are convinced that such existed. By the early 1960s, a "decoder ring" was offered by PF Shoes, in comjunction with the Jonny Quest primetime television cartoon. After that, a few more "decoder rings" were offered, including one by Ovaltine in 2000."

-- Kjkolb 11:19, 3 April 2006 (UTC)

Contradictory statements[edit]

The article contradicts itself. This is based on revision [1]

  • The first paragraph states Ovaltine started cryptological premiums for the Little Orphan Annie radio program, and continued with the Captain Midnight radio and television programs.
  • The third paragraph stats There is a myth that decoder rings were premiums offered by radio programs.

Yngvarr (t) (c) 14:07, 26 August 2008 (UTC)

Secret Decoder Wedding Ring[edit]

Bruce Schneier and Cory Doctorow have designed a "Secret Decoder Wedding Ring". Description and pictures available at http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0809.html#8 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.65.48.66 (talk) 23:47, 19 September 2008 (UTC)