Talk:T cell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Molecular and Cell Biology (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Molecular and Cell Biology. To participate, visit the WikiProject for more information.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Medicine (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Anatomy (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Anatomy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Anatomy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article has been classified as relating to microanatomy.
 
WikiProject AIDS
WikiProject icon This article is part of WikiProject AIDS, an attempt to build a comprehensive, detailed, and accessible guide to AIDS, HIV, and related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate in the project, you can choose to edit this article, or visit the project page for more information.
 
WikiProject Physiology (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Physiology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Physiology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article has been classified as relating to the physiology of cells.
 

Purpose of T-cells[edit]

The article has great depth on types of T-cells, their development, etc, but a little more "why" rather than "how" and "what" would be great. Even one sentence in the summary would go a long way, distinguishing their role from that of B-cells, for instance. I'd be happy to take a crack at it, but it's probably better done by a true subject matter expert — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rockfox212 (talkcontribs) 13:00, 2 August 2016 (UTC)

Hyphen or not?[edit]

Throughout the article the term is spelled without a hyphen (T cell), except in the accompanying image for T cell activation, where it's inconsistently spelled "T-cell" and "T cell" - Can someone clarify the usage here? Is with or without hyphen preferred? Should there be a difference for hyphenated adejctives, as in "T-cell activation"?

Thanks, 216.165.126.18 14:30, 10 September 2007 (UTC)

It's not really a set phrase, so rules are as for normal hyphen usage. I'd just go with whatever makes sense at the time. Unless it's unclear that the "cell" refers to the "T", I'd stick with "T cell". But in some cases, as with "T-cell activation", where, to the non-specialist, there is the potential for confusion as to what is happening, I'd use a hyphen. Consult a copy of Fowler's! Kantokano 15:15, 10 September 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for clarifying! 216.165.126.18 16:17, 21 September 2007 (UTC)

According to National Cancer Institute word style list there is hyphen when it is used as adjective, e.g. "T-cell lymphoma", otherwise when used as a noun it is written as "T cell". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.226.21.117 (talk) 09:18, 22 October 2014 (UTC)

That is the normal hyphenation rule in English. If "T cell" stands on its own as a noun phrase, then no hyphen is required. If "T cell" together modifies another noun (phrase), then a hyphen should be used, such as in "T-cell activation" or "T-cell lymphoma". --JorisvS (talk) 10:54, 22 October 2014 (UTC)

You can use either, some research scientists use the hyphenated version in their papers, in order to reduce the number of words due to a word limit. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.37.215.34 (talk) 13:39, 5 August 2016 (UTC)

Should mention MAIT cells[edit]

Since 2009 there has been discussion of mucosal-associated invariant T cells which seem to be activated by molecules presented by MR1 on antigen presenting cells. Should at least mention them here, then give them their own article. eg MR1 antigen presentation to mucosal-associated invariant T cells was highly conserved in evolution. 2009, [http://www.nature.com/icb/journal/v88/n8/full/icb2010104a.html Innate T cells detect bacteria. Bacteria, mucosal-associated invariant T cells and MR1. 2010], MR1 presents microbial vitamin B metabolites to MAIT cells. 2012 - Rod57 (talk) 03:12, 1 December 2012 (UTC)

The problem is the balance between making a truly comprehensive article and a readable one - I've been trying for a while to stop this article drifting off into the latest and strangest subset and to keep it general and not involve every paper someone has read and decided is important. It's probably worth waiting until these cells have been better outlined before adding them. --Kantokano (talk) 06:06, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

Are they outlined enough yet ? - eg. Innate mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are activated in inflammatory bowel diseases. - Rod57 (talk) 13:16, 20 April 2015 (UTC)

Consistent capitalization[edit]

If "T-sub-H" and "T-sub-h" refer to the same object, the article should consistently use one of the two conventions. Same for "T-sub-c" and "T-sub-C". If they do not refer to the same object, the article should specify what a "T-sub-h" cell is.

No mention of T-cell immunity[edit]

Could it be explained or linked to somehow ? - Rod57 (talk) 13:03, 20 April 2015 (UTC)

Perhaps we could say : T-cell immunity is a type of Cell-mediated immunity involving Cytotoxic T cells ? - Rod57 (talk) 22:37, 10 February 2016 (UTC)

Genetic Engineering[edit]

Hello everyone, I added a genetic engineering section as human T cell genome engineering is starting to take off in 2015. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Westernmgene (talkcontribs) 03:11, 28 September 2015 (UTC)

Not helpful yet. Does not say what type of T cell, what the changes were, or if/how it relates to Chimeric antigen receptor. - Rod57 (talk) 22:51, 10 February 2016 (UTC)

Why only CD4+ T cell activation described[edit]

The large Signalling/activation section only seems to mention CD4+ cells (~=T helper cells). Could move this section to T helper cell ? Article only briefly mentions activation of other T cell types. - Rod57 (talk) 21:52, 10 February 2016 (UTC)

Other summaries of T cell activation[edit]

Naive T cell#Activation - Rod57 (talk) 23:01, 23 February 2016 (UTC)