Talk:Yamaga Sokō

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This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as stub, and the rating on other projects was brought up to Stub class. BetacommandBot 21:45, 9 November 2007 (UTC)

This passage is not correct[edit]

The author of this text gives credit to Yamaga Soko for the development of Bushido, when in reality he had a less radical theory called "Shido". The warriors already had a developed sense of balance (between the Bun and the BU) in their earliest writings and even quote the Confucian classics by name. It is a common mistake for western scholars unfamiliar with Japanese text to miss this. All of the warrior house codes prior to the Edo period clearly state that military and literary arts should be in balance in a true warrior and that without literary arts, leadership would be disasterous.


I recommend the removal of this passage from the article, because it is contrary to the truth:

He emphasized that the peaceful arts, letters, and history were essential to the intellectual discipline of the samurai. Yamaga thus symbolizes the historical transformation of the samurai class from a purely military aristocracy to one of increasing political and intellectual leadership.<ref>De Bary, William et al. (2001). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.6.204.111 (talk) 06:22, 7 February 2008 (UTC)


Wilson states that Daidoji Yuzan and Yamaga Soko drew influence directly from Obata Kagenori, an editor of the Takeda family's writings, "The Koyogunkan", described by Wilson as "probably the most widely read book of bushi origin during the Edo Period".

(quote from the intro to Takeda translation) "This selection from Takeda's work was also included in the Koyogunkan as a part of the Takeda clan's legacy. The Koyogun­kan is given two chapters in this study because it was probably the most widely read book of bushi origin during the Edo Period, and because it was appended and put into its present form' by Obata Kagenori (1572-1663), from whose school of martial studies a number of important writers and philosophers emerged, among them Daidoji Yuzan and Yamaga Soko. Obata himself was the son of one of Shingen's retainers, employed by the Tokugawa after the Takeda clan's demise. After disciplining himself in the martial arts, he took leave of the Tokugawa and traveled the country, testing himself. He participated at both the battle of Sekigahara and the fall of Osaka Castle, thus receiving much of his knowl­edge of martial affairs first hand." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.6.204.111 (talk) 06:38, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

Yamaga Soko restated earlier writings.[edit]

Wilson states that Daidoji Yuzan and Yamaga Soko drew influence directly from Obata Kagenori, an editor of the Takeda family's writings, "The Koyogunkan", described by Wilson as "probably the most widely read book of bushi origin during the Edo Period".

(quote from the intro to Takeda translation) "This selection from Takeda's work was also included in the Koyogunkan as a part of the Takeda clan's legacy. The Koyogun­kan is given two chapters in this study because it was probably the most widely read book of bushi origin during the Edo Period, and because it was appended and put into its present form' by Obata Kagenori (1572-1663), from whose school of martial studies a number of important writers and philosophers emerged, among them Daidoji Yuzan and Yamaga Soko. Obata himself was the son of one of Shingen's retainers, employed by the Tokugawa after the Takeda clan's demise. After disciplining himself in the martial arts, he took leave of the Tokugawa and traveled the country, testing himself. He participated at both the battle of Sekigahara and the fall of Osaka Castle, thus receiving much of his knowl­edge of martial affairs first hand." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.6.204.111 (talk) 06:41, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

"shi" was used to describe samurai from the tenth century or earlier!!![edit]

"shi" was used to describe samurai centuries earlier. Yamaga did not invent bushido, he merely codified and restated what others had already written hundreds of years before. This statement, part of the article is misleading:


He was a Confucian, and applied Confucius's idea of the "superior man" to the samurai class of Japan. This became an important part of the samurai way of life and code of conduct later known as bushido. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.6.204.111 (talk) 09:26, 12 February 2008 (UTC)