Shockwave (Drayton Manor)

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Shockwave
DraytonManor Shockwave.jpg
Train just after corkscrew
Drayton Manor Theme Park
Park section Action Park
Coordinates 52°36′45″N 1°42′58″W / 52.61250°N 1.71611°W / 52.61250; -1.71611Coordinates: 52°36′45″N 1°42′58″W / 52.61250°N 1.71611°W / 52.61250; -1.71611
Status Operating
Opening date 26 March 1994
Cost £4 million
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Intamin
Designer Werner Stengel
Model Stand-up roller coaster
Track layout Out and back
Lift/launch system Chain lift hill
Height 119.7 ft (36.5 m)
Drop 105 ft (32 m)
Length 1,640 ft (500 m)
Speed 53 mph (85 km/h)
Inversions 4
Duration 2:00
G-force 4
Height restriction 55 in (140 cm)
Trains 2 trains with a single car. Riders are arranged 4 across in 6 rows for a total of 24 riders per train.
Shockwave at RCDB
Pictures of Shockwave at RCDB

The Shockwave (Originally The 7up Shockwave & npower Shockwave) is an Intamin stand-up roller coaster at Drayton Manor Theme Park at Drayton Bassett in the United Kingdom. It was opened in 1994, and is one of the only two stand-up coasters in Europe. It is also the only stand-up roller coaster with a zero-gravity roll ever made.

The ride, designed by Werner Stengel, was created as part of a two-year, £4m project in 1993-94. The Shockwave's station is located directly above Splash Canyon's station area, in the 'Action Park' area next to G Force.

Ride Experience[edit]

The Shockwave, which reaches 53 mph (85 km/h) and delivers up to 4 g, features a lift to 119.7 ft (36.5 m), then an 105 ft (32 m) drop into a loop followed by a zero-gravity roll, corkscrews and a bend around back to the station. Originally, the track was white with brown supports, but between 2004 and 2012 it was repainted to have a light blue track and turquoise supports. Also in 2012 the Trains were repainted: 1 Blue and the other Red. Both will operate on busy days. In 2016, the ride and trains received new logos

In 1994, the ride opened along with two other roller coasters in the UK; the Pepsi Max Big One at Pleasure Beach Blackpool, and Nemesis at Alton Towers (which opened one week before the Shockwave). In fact, it had been built as planned, but local councillors had not noticed the proximity to the boundary when considering the plans.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "An Interview with Colin Bryan". Coaster Kingdom. 2004. Retrieved 2006-03-24.