Special routes of U.S. Route 78

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U.S. Route 78 marker

U.S. Route 78
Highway system

At least 15 special routes of U.S. Route 78 have existed.

Mississippi[edit]

Red Banks business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Business
Location: Red Banks, Mississippi

Hickory Flat business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Business
Location: Hickory Flat, Mississippi

Alabama[edit]

Hamilton–Graysville alternate route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Alternate
Location: HamiltonGraysville, Alabama

Carbon Hill–Jasper alternate route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Alternate
Location: Carbon HillJasper, Alabama

Birmingham–Irondale alternate route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Alternate
Location: BirminghamIrondale, Alabama

Birmingham truck route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Truck
Location: Birmingham, Alabama

Leeds truck route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Truck
Location: Leeds, Alabama

Anniston business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Business
Location: Anniston, Alabama

Alabama–Georgia[edit]

US 78N [edit]

U.S. Highway 78N
Location: Heflin, AlabamaVilla Rica, Georgia
Existed: 1927[3][4]–November 1934[1][2]

U.S. Route 78N (US 78N) was a northern divided U.S. highway that comprised the current mainline of US 78 from Heflin, Alabama, to Villa Rica, Georgia.

The road that would eventually become US 78N was established in 1920, as SR 8 from the Alabama state line to Villa Rica.[5] By the end of the third quarter of 1926, US 78 was established, being designated along a local roadway from Heflin to the state line, and SR 8 from the state line to Villa Rica.[3][6] The next year, US 78 split into two divided routes, with US 78N being designated from Heflin to Villa Rica, on the northern segment of SR 8 (thereby replacing the mainline highway).[7] In 1928, Alabama State Route 4 (SR-4) was designated along US-78N.[7][8] By May 1933, US 78N/SR 8 were paved from Bremen to Villa Rica.[9][10] Later that month, US 78N/SR 8 were paved from east of the Alabama state line to Bremen.[10][11] The next month, US 78N/SR 8 were paved west to the Alabama state line.[11][12] By November 1934, US 78N was redesignated as part of mainline US 78.[1][2]

US 78S [edit]

U.S. Highway 78S
Location: Heflin, AlabamaVilla Rica, Georgia
Existed: 1927[7]–November 1934[1][2]

U.S. Route 78S (US 78S) was a southern divided U.S. highway that comprised the current length of Alabama State Route 46 from Heflin, Alabama, to the Georgia state line, SR 166 from the state line to Carrollton, and SR 61 from Carrollton to Villa Rica.

The road that would eventually become US 78 was established in 1920 as part of SR 34 from Carrollton to Villa Rica.[5] By the end of the third quarter of 1921, SR 16 was designated from the Alabama state line, west of Bowdon to Carrollton.[5][6] By late 1926, SR 16 and SR 34 were redesignated as a southern branch of SR 8.[3][6] In 1927, US 78 split into two divided routes, with US 78S being designated from Heflin to Villa Rica, via Bowdon and Carrollton, on the southern branch of SR 8.[7] In 1928, Alabama State Route 4 (SR-4) was designated along US-78N, while SR-46 was designated along US-78S.[7][8] By 1932, US 78S/SR 8 were paved from Carrollton to just southwest of Villa Rica.[4][13] By the end of 1934, US 78S/SR 8 were paved from the Alabama state line to a point near Bowdon.[14][15] By November 1934, US 78S was redesignated as US 78 Alternate.[1][2] By the beginning of 1948, the southern branch of SR 8 was redesignated as SR 8 Alternate.[16][17] By the middle of 1954, SR 8 Alternate was redesignated as SR 166 from the Alabama state line to northeast of Carrollton) and SR 61 from there to Villa Rica.[18][19]

Heflin–Villa Rica alternate route[edit]


U.S. Highway 78 Alternate
Location: Heflin, AlabamaVilla Rica, Georgia
Existed: 1934[1][2]–1952[20][21]

U.S. Route 78 Alternate (US 78 Alt.) was an alternate route of US 78 in northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia. It comprised the current length of Alabama State Route 46 (SR 46) from Heflin, Alabama, to the Georgia state line, SR 166 from the state line to Carrollton, and SR 61 from Carrollton to Villa Rica.

The road that would eventually become US 78 Alternate was established in 1920 as part of SR 34 from Carrollton to Villa Rica.[5] By the end of the third quarter of 1921, SR 16 was designated from the Alabama state line, west of Bowdon to Carrollton.[5][6] By late 1926, SR 16 and SR 34 were redesignated as a southern branch of SR 8.[3][6] In 1927, US 78 split into two divided routes, with US 78S being designated from Heflin to Villa Rica, via Bowdon and Carrollton, on the southern branch of SR 8.[7] In 1928, SR 4 was designated along US-78N, while SR 46 was designated along US-78S.[7][8] By 1932, US 78S/SR 8 were paved from Carrollton to just southwest of Villa Rica.[4][13] By the end of 1934, US 78S/SR 8 were paved from the Alabama state line to a point near Bowdon.[22][15] By November 1934, US 78S was redesignated as US 78 Alt.[1][2] By the beginning of 1948, the southern branch of SR 8 was redesignated as SR 8 Alternate.[16][17] By the beginning of 1953, US 78 Alt. was decommissioned.[20][21] By the middle of 1954, SR 8 Alternate was redesignated as SR 166 from the Alabama state line to northeast of Carrollton) and SR 61 from there to Villa Rica.[18][19]

Georgia[edit]

Athens business loop[edit]

U.S. Highway 78 Business
Location: Athens, Georgia
Length: 9.9 mi[23] (15.9 km)
US 78 Business/SR 10 (Broad Street) intersection with Lumpkin Street in the heart of Athens. This sign along Lumpkin Street says that Broad Street carries US 78 instead of the business route.

U.S. Route 78 Business (US 78 Bus.) in the Athens – Clarke County metropolitan area is a Bannered U.S. Highway that is concurrent with Georgia State Route 10 (SR 10) for its entire length. Its western terminus is at an interchange with US 29/SR 8/SR 316 and US 78/SR 10, southeast of Bogart in Oconee County. Its eastern terminus is at US 29/US 129/US 441/SR 10 Loop/SR 15. The roadway continues as US 78/SR 10.

All of US 78 Bus. in Clarke County is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[24]

Prior to the completion of the Athens Perimeter Highway, and SR 316, the Broad Street and Atlanta Highway portions of US 78 Business carried US 29/US 78 through Athens' downtown and commercial west side. US 29 entered Athens via North Avenue and Thomas Street, joining US 78 at the Broad Street–Thomas Street–Oconee Street intersection downtown. The combined highways continued to the Pepsi bottling plant in Bogart, where US 78 turned left onto the Moina Michael Highway and US 29 continued straight into Bogart.

When SR 10 Loop was completed, US 29 was routed along the north side of the loop, while US 78 was routed along the south side, with US 78 Bus. being established inside the loop. North Avenue and Thomas Street had their state route designation removed. SR 316 (also carrying US 29) had been completed only up to Moina Michael Highway, so the stretch of highway from there to SR 10 Loop (sections of Moina Michael Highway and Atlanta Highway) continued to carry US 29/US 78. Once SR 316 was completed to SR 10 Loop, US 29/US 78 were moved to SR 316, and US 29 was switched from the north side of the loop to the south side of the loop while US 78 Bus. was extended over Atlanta Highway and Moina Michael Highway to its present state. (Some maps still show US 29 along the north side of SR 10 Loop but that is incorrect; all signage is consistent with US 29 being routed on the south and east sides of the loop.)


County Location mi[23] km Destinations Notes
Oconee 0.0 0.0 US 29 / SR 8 west / SR 316 (University Parkway) to I‑85 / US 78 (University Parkway) / SR 10 (Monroe Highway) – North Atlanta, Monroe Western terminus; west end of SR 10 concurrency
Clarke Athens 3.4 5.5 SR 10 Loop (Athens Perimeter Highway) – Watkinsville, University of Georgia, Hartwell, Elberton SR 10 Loop exit 18
5.1 8.2 Epps Bridge Parkway to SR 316 west - Atlanta Interchange; northern terminus of Epps Bridge Parkway
7.9 12.7 SR 15 Alt. (Milledge Avenue) – Greensboro, Gainesville
9.9 15.9 US 29 / US 129 / US 441 / SR 15 (Athens Perimeter Highway) / US 78 / SR 8 / SR 10 east / SR 10 Loop (Athens Perimeter Highway) – Commerce, Jefferson, Lexington, Washington Eastern terminus; east end of SR 10 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Washington business loop[edit]

U.S. Highway 78 Business
Location: Washington, Georgia
Length: 4.6 mi[25] (7.4 km)
Existed: 1980–

U.S. Route 78 Business (US 78 Bus.) is a 4.6-mile-long (7.4 km) business route of US 78 that exists entirely within the south-central part of Wilkes County. Nearly its entire length is within the city limits of Washington. It is concurrent with State Route 10 Business (SR 10 Bus.) for its entire length.

The concurrency begins at an intersection with US 78/SR 10, northwest of Washington. The business routes are known as Lexington Avenue. They travel to the southeast until they enter the city limits; then, they curve to the east-southeast. Just past Recreation Drive, they enter the Washington Historic District. They intersect SR 44 (North Mercer Street). At the eastern terminus of Callow Drive, US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus. curve to an east-southeast direction and are known as West Robert Toombs Avenue, named for Robert Toombs, a U.S. representative and senator from Georgia, as well as a Confederate general and Confederate secretary of state. At Depot Street, they are about one block north of the northern terminus of the Georgia Woodlands Railroad line. Spring Street marks the beginning of a concurrency with SR 47. Between Spring Street and Cheney Parkway, the three highways pass by the town square. At the corner of East Liberty Street, they pass by the historic Washington Presbyterian Church, just before passing the Robert Toombs House. A short distance later, they intersect SR 17 Bus. (Poplar Street), which joins the concurrency. Immediately after that intersection, the four highways curve to the southeast and pass the Washington–Wilkes Historical Museum. US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus./SR 17 Bus./SR 47 intersect East Street, which leads to Washington–Wilkes Elementary School. They continue to the southeast, before intersecting US 78/US 378/SR 10/SR 17. At this intersection, US 78 Bus./SR 10 Bus./SR 17 Bus. end, while SR 47 continues, concurrent with the beginning of US 378 (Lincolnton Road).[25] US 78 Bus. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[26]

The entire route is in Wilkes County.

Location mi[25] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 US 78 / SR 10 (Lexington Road) / SR 10 Bus. east – Lexington, Athens Western terminus of US 78 Bus. and SR 10 Bus.; west end of SR 10 Bus. concurrency
Washington 2.5 4.0 SR 44 (North Mercer Street) – Union Point, Greensboro
3.0 4.8 SR 47 south (Spring Street) – Crawfordville West end of SR 47 concurrency
3.4 5.5 SR 17 Bus. north (Poplar Drive) – Danburg, Chennault West end of SR 17 Bus. concurrency
4.6 7.4 US 78 / SR 10 / SR 17 / US 378 east (Lincolnton Road) / SR 10 Bus. west / SR 17 Bus. north / SR 47 south – Elberton, Thomson Eastern terminus of US 78 Bus. and SR 10 Bus.; southern terminus of SR 17 Bus.; western terminus of US 378; east end of SR 10 Bus., SR 17 Bus., and SR 47 concurrencies; SR 47 continues, concurrent with US 378.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

South Carolina[edit]

Aiken truck route[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Truck
Location: Aiken, South Carolina
Length: 8.4 mi[27] (13.5 km)

U.S. Route 78 Truck (US 78 Truck) is a Truck route of the US 78 that bypasses north of downtown Aiken, via University Parkway and Rudy Mason Parkway. Its routing is in complete concurrency of SC 118, and it also shares with other truck routes from U.S. and State routes. The road is two-lane on both ends, with a four-lane stretches between Laurens Street-Willow Run Road and Old Wagener Road-Charleston Highway. Though the routing is longer than going through the downtown area, it does provide a faster connection with US 1.

The entire route is in Aiken County.

Location mi[27] km Destinations Notes
Aiken 0.0 0.0
US 1 / US 78 / SC 118 / US 1 Truck
Western terminus; South end of US 1 Truck/SC 19 Truck and west end of SC 118 overlap
4.6 7.4 SC 19 (Laurens Street NW) – Trenton North end of SC 19 Truck overlap
5.6 9.0
US 1 (York Street NE) / US 1 Truck – Batesburg-Leesville
North end of US 1 Truck overlap
8.3 13.4 SC 4 / SC 302 east (Wagener Road) East end of SC 302 overlap
8.4 13.5 US 78 / SC 118 / SC 302 west Eastern terminus; East end of SC 118 and west end SC 302 overlap
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Blackville business loop[edit]


U.S. Route 78 Business
Location: Blackville, South Carolina
Length: 0.70 mi[28] (1.1 km)
Existed: 1981–present

U.S. Route 78 Business (US 78 Business) is a short business loop in the central part of the town of Blackville, via Walker and Main Streets. Originally, US 78 traversed along the route until by 1967, when new road south was created, allowing it to bypass Main Street.[29] The old alignment was not made into a business route till at least 1981; however, though it is signed as a business loop, on state and county maps it is officially a connector route in disguise.[30][31]

The entire route is in Blackville, Barnwell County.

mi[28] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 US 78 (Dexter Street) – Williston, Denmark Western terminus
0.2 0.32 SC 3 (Solomon Blatt Avenue) – Barnwell, Columbia
0.7 1.1 US 78 (Dexter Street) – Denmark, Williston Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f State Road Map of Alabama (XSL) (Map). General Drafting. 1933. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f State Road Map of Alabama (XSL) (Map). General Drafting. November 1, 1934. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 15, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d e State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Alabama System of State Roads (XSL) (Map). Alabama Department of Transportation. January 1, 1927. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c State Road Map of Alabama (XSL) (Map). Alabama Department of Transportation. Fall 1928. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  10. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April–May 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  16. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved April 18, 2014.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  17. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved April 18, 2014.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  18. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  19. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved April 18, 2014.  (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  21. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1953). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1953.)
  22. ^ Georgia State Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by GSHD. Georgia Department of Transportation. April 1, 1934. Retrieved April 18, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b Google (April 15, 2014). "Route of US 78 Business (Athens)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 15, 2014. 
  24. ^ National Highway System: Athens-Clarke County, GA (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2016. 
  25. ^ a b c Google (April 16, 2014). "Route of US 78 Business (Washington)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 16, 2014. 
  26. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2016. 
  27. ^ a b Google (May 23, 2013). "Route of US 78 Truck" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 23, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b Google (May 23, 2013). "Route of US 78 Business" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 23, 2013. 
  29. ^ General Highway Map, Barnwell County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1967. Retrieved April 11, 2014. 
  30. ^ General Highway Map, Barnwell County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1987. Retrieved April 11, 2014. 
  31. ^ General Highway System - Town of Blackville (PDF) (Map). South Carolina Department of Transportation. July 2009. Retrieved July 13, 2013.