United States women's national rugby sevens team

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United States
Usa rugby textlogo.png
UnionUSA Rugby
Nickname(s)Eagles
Coach(es)Emilie Bydwell[1]
Captain(s)Abby Gustaitis &
Kris Thomas
Top scorerAlev Kelter (752)
Most triesAlev Kelter (87)
Team kit
Change kit
World Cup Sevens
Appearances3 (First in 2009)
Best result3rd place (2009, 2013)
Official website
www.usa.rugby/womens-eagles-sevens/

The United States women's national rugby sevens team competes in international rugby sevens competitions.[2] The team finished second at the 2015 USA Women's Sevens, after defeating Russia in the semifinals. They competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics.[3]

History[edit]

(Source: US Women's Rugby Foundation and USA Rugby)

In 1996 the first assembly of a National Women's 7s team was formed. Emil Signes held tryouts to pick a team to compete in the first Women's International 7s tournament to be held during the Hong Kong 7s event. The team competed under the name ‘Atlantis’, the National 7s program created by Emil, and finished their tour undefeated. Many of these players went on to compete for the USA Women's 7s Team in the Hong Kong 7s Women's Division.

Under head coach Ric Suggit, the Eagles placed third at the 2013 Women's Sevens World Cup in Russia. They defeated Spain 10–5 in their final match, with tries coming from Emilie Bydwell and Vanesha McGee.[4]

In June 2019, the Eagles became just the fifth team to have won a World Series tournament, joining New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and England. In that same season, the Americans finished second in the overall standings, securing both their highest finish to date and automatic qualification to the 2020 Olympic Games.[5]

Tournament History[edit]

World Rugby Sevens Series[edit]

Season by season

Season Rank Points Events Cups Plates Bowls* Most tries Most points
2012–13 4th 48 4 0 1 1
2013–14 7th 38 5 0 2 1
2014–15 5th 76 6 0 1 0
2015–16 6th 46 5 0 1 0
2016–17 6th 62 6 0 0 0
2017–18 5th 56 5 0 0 1
2018–19 2nd 100 6 1 0 0 Naya Tapper (18) Alev Kelter (141)
Total 37 1 5 3 Naya Tapper (77) Alev Kelter (624)

* – At the start of the 2016–17 season, the plate was abandoned, with the bowl replaced by the Challenge Trophy.

Summer Olympics[edit]

Olympic Games record
Year Round Position Pld W L D
Brazil 2016 Quarterfinals 5th 6 3 2 1
Japan 2020 5th place match 6th 6 4 2 0
Total 0 Titles 2/2 12 7 4 1

Rugby World Cup Sevens[edit]

Rugby World Cup Sevens
Year Round Position Pld W L D
United Arab Emirates 2009 Semifinals 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 5 3 2 0
Russia 2013 3rd place playoff 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 6 5 1 0
United States 2018 Bronze Final 4th 4 2 2 0
South Africa 2022 Bronze Final 4th 4 2 2 0
Total 0 Titles 4/4 19 12 7 0

2009[edit]

Pool B

Team Pld W D L PF PA +/- Pts
 England 3 3 0 0 93 0 +93 9
 United States 3 2 0 1 50 17 +33 7
 Russia 3 1 0 2 31 51 −20 5
 Japan 3 0 0 3 10 116 −106 3

Cup

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
 
 
 
 France0
 
 
 
 United States19
 
 United States12
 
 
 
 New Zealand14
 
 New Zealand33
 
 
 
 Canada12
 
 New Zealand10
 
 
 
 Australia15
 
 Spain7
 
 
 
 South Africa15
 
 South Africa10
 
 
 
 Australia17
 
 England10
 
 
 Australia17
 

Rugby X Tournament[edit]

Rugby X Tournament
Year Position Pld W L D
England 2019 2nd 2 1 1 0

Team[edit]

Current squad[edit]

United States' roster of 12 athletes was named on 17 June 2021.[6]

Head coach: Emilie Bydwell[1]

Previous squads[edit]

Notable players[edit]

Honors[edit]

World Series
Finish 
Tourney
Gold Silver Bronze Plate (Fifth)
Dubai Sevens 2017 2015
USA Sevens 2013, 2015 & 2018 2014 & 2016
China Sevens 2013
Amsterdam Sevens 2013 & 2014
São Paulo Sevens
Australia Sevens 2017 2019
Japan Sevens 2019
Canada Sevens 2018 & 2019 2015
France Sevens 2019 2018
Spain Sevens 2022 (Malaga)
Other Top Three Finishes

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Emilie Bydwell selected as Head Coach of USA Women's Sevens National Team". USA Rugby. Retrieved 2021-12-14.
  2. ^ "IRB announces Women's Sevens World Series" (Press release). International Rugby Board. October 4, 2012. Archived from the original on October 19, 2014. Retrieved October 4, 2012.
  3. ^ Blaber, Junoir (2016-07-18). "USA Rugby Names 2016 U.S. Olympic Women's Rugby Team". rugbywrapup.com. Retrieved 2021-10-25.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Eagles claim third place victory with thrilling sudden death try". USA Rugby. Retrieved 2016-02-26.
  5. ^ "U.S. women's rugby team earns first World Series title, Olympic spot". OlympicTalk | NBC Sports. 2019-06-17. Retrieved 2021-10-25.
  6. ^ "U.S. Olympic women's rugby team roster announced". NBC Sports. 17 June 2021.

External links[edit]