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Natsu Dragneel[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 1
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Tetsuya Kakihara
Mako (child)
English
Todd Haberkorn
Luci Christian (child)
Portrayed by Shūta Miyazuki (musical)

Natsu Dragneel (Japanese: ナツ・ドラグニル, Hepburn: Natsu Doraguniru) is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the Fairy Tail manga series created by Hiro Mashima. He is introduced in the first chapter of Fairy Tail as a teenage member of the eponymous wizards' guild, who are notorious in the fictional kingdom of Fiore for their numerous accounts of causing unintentional property damage with their magic. A dragon slayer (滅竜魔導士 (ドラゴンスレイヤー), doragon sureiyā), Natsu possesses the same abilities as his foster father, the dragon Igneel, namely the ability to consume and envelop himself in fire, for which he is famously named Salamander (火竜 (サラマンダー), Saramandā). Natsu's predominant role in the series is to reunite with Igneel, who has been missing for seven years by the story's outset. Over the course of the series, Natsu learns about his connection to Zeref, the immortal Black Wizard, including his heritage as Zeref's dead brother that is resurrected as a demon called Etherious Natsu Dragneel (E.N.D.).

Creation and conception[edit]

Natsu was one of the first characters Hiro Mashima created during the development of Fairy Tail. He was conceptualized as a fire-using member of a courier guild who would suffer from motion sickness, a character trait he based on one of his friends,[1] which was implemented into the final version of the character.[vol. 1:afterword] Mashima also cited his own personality as a junior high school student as inspiration for Natsu's character,[1] and his father's death as an influence for the relationship between Natsu and Igneel.[2] Natsu's concept evolved in a one-shot short story titled Fairy Tale, where he is depicted as a spirit with horns.[vol. 1] The character's name is derived from the Japanese word for "summer" (, natsu) to follow up on the main character of Hiro Mashima's previous work Rave Master being named Haru, which means "spring".[vol. 2:afterword] He is normally depicted wearing black-colored clothing, which Mashima chose in favor of his original choice of red to improve the contrast with between his fire and clothing.[3]

Natsu's age is left ambiguous throughout the series. The character's profile on the cover of chapter 23 lists his age as "unknown",[ch. 23] and during chapter 108, he is trapped behind a runic blockade designed to prevent those over the age of 80 from crossing.[ch. 108] In the Q&A section of the manga's Volume 15 tankōbon release, it was asserted that the character's age is actually not over 80, and that "beyond that would be revealing an important plot point".[vol. 15]

In the anime adaptation and related media, Natsu's Japanese voice actor is Tetsuya Kakihara, while actress Mako provides Natsu's voice in scenes depicting the character as a child. Kakihara, who was a fan of the manga before the anime adaptation was announced, expressed immediate interest when auditions were being held. Because Natsu was the only character whose voice he could not imagine, Kakihara did not expect to be cast as Natsu and was pleasantly surprised when he received the role.[4] In the English dub produced by Funimation, Todd Haberkorn performs his voice in most appearances, with Luci Christian performing the child version.

Appearances[edit]

Natsu first appears as a member of the Fairy Tail wizard's guild who searches for the whereabouts of Igneel, a dragon who disappeared on the date of July 7, X777, seven years before the beginning of the series.[ch. 66] Before Natsu's induction into the guild, Igneel adopts him as an orphaned child and trains him in the use of Fire Dragon Slayer Magic (火の滅竜魔法, Hi no Metsuryū Mahō),[ch. 2] which grants him the ability to consume and create fire, and makes him immune to fire-based attacks.[ch. 1] It also affords him other superhuman abilities such as immense strength, a heightened sense of smell and hearing,[ch. 77, 329] and resilience against otherwise lethal attacks.[ch. 77] Due to his sharpened senses, however, he suffers from incapacitating motion sickness when riding virtually any sort of transportation.[ch. 1, 514] While investigating a rumor of a "salamander" in the town of Hargeon, mistaking it for Igneel, the teenage Natsu and his companion Happy rescue Lucy Heartfilia from a slaver operating under Natsu's moniker "Salamander". Natsu and Happy invite Lucy into Fairy Tail, where the three perform paid missions alongside each other.[ch. 1, 3] They are later joined by two of Natsu's childhood rivals, Gray Fullbuster and Erza Scarlet, forming what their guildmates label as Fairy Tail's "most powerful team".[ch. 69]

In the following months, Natsu develops his skills as a dragon slayer by temporarily gaining the power-boosting Dragon Force (ドラゴンフォース, Doragon Fōsu) ability. He is eventually selected to participate in Fairy Tail's promotional trial held on Sirius Island, the guild's sacred ground.[ch. 201] The trial is interrupted when Natsu and his guildmates encounter Zeref, a notorious, immortal dark wizard who wishes to be killed by Natsu, but is not recognized by him.[ch. 208, 209] Zeref's presence on the island attracts the attention of the dark guild Grimoire Heart, led by former Fairy Tail guild master Hades, whom Natsu defeats after obtaining the Raien-ryū (雷炎竜, "Thunder Fire Dragon", renamed "Lightning Fire Dragon" in the Funimation dub) Mode from Laxus Dreyar, which combines their fire and lightning magic, respectively. Shortly afterward, the black dragon Acnologia assaults the Fairy Tail wizards, who are placed into seven years of suspended animation by the spirit of Mavis Vermillion, Hades' predecessor, for protection.

Returning to find that the other wizard guilds in Fiore have far surpassed their guild, Natsu participates in the Grand Magic Games tournament with his friends. Receiving a power upgrade from Jellal Fernandez's vigilante guild, Crime Sorcière, Natsu single-handedly defeats the reigning champions Sting Eucliffe and Rogue Cheney, two dragon slayers believed to be the strongest in the kingdom. Following Fairy Tail's victory in the tournament, Natsu becomes embroiled in a war between his guild and Tartaros, a dark guild of Etherious demons created by Zeref that seek to summon E.N.D., Zeref's ultimate creation. When Acnologia appears and threatens both guilds, Igneel emerges from Natsu's body, revealed to have sealed himself within Natsu at the time of their apparent separation in order to inoculate him against "dragonification", a dragon slayer affliction that transforms them into dragons similar to Acnologia.[ch. 400, 414] Despite unlocking his latent ability to activate Dragon Force at will, Natsu is helpless to prevent Acnologia from killing Igneel.

Natsu embarks on a year-long training journey with Happy to prepare for a future encounter with Zeref and Acnologia. He returns with an innately heightened level of power, Fire Dragon King (炎竜王, Enryū-ō) Mode, that allows him to fight on par with Zeref.[ch. 464] Learning that Fairy Tail has disbanded in his absence, Natsu seeks out his friends and reforms the guild. During Zeref's ensuing invasion with the militaristic Alvarez Empire, Natsu fails to finish Zeref off in time after being informed of his heritage: Zeref identifies himself as Natsu's older brother, Zeref Dragneel, and Natsu as E.N.D. (Etherious Natsu Dragneel), resurrected from death as an infant to kill his brother.[ch. 436] It is further revealed that Igneel raised Natsu at Zeref's behest 400 years ago before sending him to the present era through Eclipse, Zeref's time travel gate, to assist in defeating Acnologia.[ch. 465] This knowledge triggers Natsu's demonic transformation, which manifests as a tumor-like "demon seed" that, coupled with a similar "dragon seed" that induces dragonification, endangers his life.[ch. 503, 516] After falling into a coma following a rampage in his demon form,[ch. 516] Natsu experiences a metaphysical dream with various figures from his past and destroys both seeds by asserting his identity as a human.[ch. 520]

In other media[edit]

Natsu has appeared in other Fairy Tail works outside the manga and anime series. He is featured in both film adaptations of the series, Phoenix Priestess and Dragon Cry,[5] as well as nine different original animated videos, including a crossover with Rave Master, another series created by Hiro Mashima.[6] He is also a playable character in every Fairy Tail video game.[7][8] Natsu's voice actor, Tetsuya Kakihara, was also featured in an internet radio program airing on HiBiKi Radio Station on February 11, 2012.[9]

Characteristics[edit]

Natsu is a teenager who is recognized by his pink, spiky hair and white scarf,[ch. 1] the latter of which is knitted from Igneel's scales, and is his most treasured possession. He is commonly accompanied by Happy, a catlike Exceed whom Natsu hatches from an egg as a child, and is able to be carried by him without succumbing to motion sickness.[ch. 3] Depicted as the "problem child" of Fairy Tail,[ch. 23] Natsu is a rambunctious wizard who often thoughtlessly charges into battle and rarely controls his own strength, resulting in the most numerous accounts of property damage his guild is blamed for.[ch. 2] Despite this, he maintains strong friendships with his guildmates and a firm belief in camaraderie, becoming enraged at the sight of others harming his friends or their own allies. Ultear Milkovich also notes that Natsu is more cunning and perceptive than he appears to be when in the midst of battle.[ch. 42] When he activates Dragon Force, parts of Natsu's face, arms, legs and chest become temporarily covered in scales.[ch. 98] Being a human that is repurposed to become an Etherious demon, Natsu possesses a latent instinct to kill his creator, Zeref, after which his life is forfeit.[ch. 465] While assuming his Etherious form, Natsu's sense of reason is overridden by his murderous instincts, making him unable to distinguish friend from foe.[ch. 504]

Reception[edit]

Natsu ranked second in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Aoki, Deb. "Interview: Hiro Mashima". About.com. The New York Times Company. p. 1. Retrieved April 26, 2012. 
  2. ^ Cha, Kai-ming (August 5, 2008). "Everyday Hiro: Fairy Tail's Mashima at Comic-Con". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved November 24, 2011. 
  3. ^ Mashima, Hiro (July 17, 2007). 超おまけ フェアリーテイル FAIRY TAIL Super Supplement (in Japanese). Kodansha. 
  4. ^ a b 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Fairy Tail Adventure Manga Gets Film Next August". Anime News Network. October 12, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Fairy Tail Film's Prologue Manga Gets Anime Also". Anime News Network. April 15, 2013. Retrieved July 11, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Tokyo Game Show 2009 Konami Special Site". Konami. Archived from the original on November 26, 2009. Retrieved October 21, 2011. 
  8. ^ Yip, Spencer (April 8, 2010). "Only Two Months Until Fairy Tail: Portable Guild". Siliconera. Retrieved April 9, 2010. 
  9. ^ "番組紹介:FAIRY TAIL Webラジオ『魔導士ギルド放送局 やりすぎソーサラー!』" (in Japanese). hibiki-radio.jp/. Retrieved January 24, 2012. 

Fairy Tail manga volumes by Hiro Mashima. Original Japanese version published by Kodansha. English translation published by Del Rey Manga and Kodansha.

Individual volumes

  1. Vol. 1 (ch. 1–4): December 2006 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363771-7. March 2008 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50133-2.
  2. Vol. 2 (ch. 5–13): January 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363782-3. March 2008 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50330-5.
  3. Vol. 3 (ch. 14–22): March 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363810-3. June 2008 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50556-9.
  4. Vol. 4 (ch. 23–30): May 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363832-5. September 2008 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50557-6.
  5. Vol. 5 (ch. 31–39): July 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363857-8. January 2009 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50558-3.
  6. Vol. 6 (ch. 40–48): September 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363890-5. April 2009 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-50681-8.
  7. Vol. 7 (ch. 49–56): November 2007 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363914-8. July 2009 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51039-6.
  8. Vol. 8 (ch. 57–65): January 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363940-7. October 2009 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51040-2.
  9. Vol. 9 (ch. 66–74): March 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363965-0. December 2009 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51233-8.
  10. Vol. 10 (ch. 75–82): May 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-363986-5. March 2010 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51457-8.
  11. Vol. 11 (ch. 83–91): August 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384023-0. June 2010 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51992-4.
  12. Vol. 12 (ch. 92–100): October 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384050-6. September 2010 (in English). ISBN 978-0-345-51993-1.
  13. Vol. 13 (ch. 101–109): December 2008 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384075-9. May 2011 (in English). ISBN 978-1-935429-32-6.
  14. Vol. 14 (ch. 110–118): March 2009 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384098-8. July 2011 (in English). ISBN 978-1-935429-33-3.
  15. Vol. 15 (ch. 119–126): May 2009 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384136-7. September 2011 (in English). ISBN 978-1-935429-34-0
  16. Vol. 16 (ch. 127–134): July 2009 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384158-9. November 2011 (in English). ISBN 978-1-935429-35-7.
  17. Vol. 17 (ch. 135–143): September 2009 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384185-5. January 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-054-1.
  18. Vol. 18 (ch. 144–152): November 2009 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384211-1. March 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-055-8.
  19. Vol. 19 (ch. 153–160): January 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384233-3. May 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-056-5.
  20. Vol. 20 (ch. 161–169): March 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384266-1. July 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-057-2.
  21. Vol. 21 (ch. 170–178): May 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384296-8. September 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-058-9.
  22. Vol. 22 (ch. 179–187): August 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384346-0. November 2012 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-059-6.
  23. Vol. 23 (ch. 188–196): October 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384379-8. January 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-060-2.
  24. Vol. 24 (ch. 197–204): December 2010 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384416-0. March 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-266-8.
  25. Vol. 25 (ch. 205–213): February 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384442-9. April 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-267-5.
  26. Vol. 26 (ch. 214–222): April 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384473-3. May 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-268-2.
  27. Vol. 27 (ch. 223–230): June 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384502-0. June 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-269-9.
  28. Vol. 28 (ch. 231–239): August 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384533-4. July 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-270-5.
  29. Vol. 29 (ch. 240–248): October 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384563-1. August 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-406-8.
  30. Vol. 30 (ch. 249–257): December 2011 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384597-6. September 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-407-5.
  31. Vol. 31 (ch. 258–266): February 2012 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384628-7. October 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-408-2.
  32. Vol. 32 (ch. 267–274): April 2012 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384654-6. November 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-409-9.
  33. Vol. 33 (ch. 275–282): June 2012 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384686-7. December 2013 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-410-5.
  34. Vol. 34 (ch. 283–291): August 2012 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384719-2. January 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-411-2.
  35. Vol. 35 (ch. 292–299): November 2012 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384765-9. February 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-412-9.
  36. Vol. 36 (ch. 300–308): February 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384810-6. March 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-432-7.
  37. Vol. 37 (ch. 309–317): April 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384845-8. April 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-433-4.
  38. Vol. 38 (ch. 318–325): June 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-384876-2. May 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-434-1 (in English)
  39. Vol. 39 (ch. 326–335): August 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-394908-7. June 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-435-8.
  40. Vol. 40 (ch. 336–344): October 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-394941-4. July 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-417-4.
  41. Vol. 41 (ch. 345–353): December 2013 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-394982-7. August 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-437-2.
  42. Vol. 42 (ch. 354–361): March 2014 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395009-0. September 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-561-4.
  43. Vol. 43 (ch. 362–369): May 2014 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395077-9. October 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-562-1.
  44. Vol. 44 (ch. 370–378): July 2014 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395124-0. November 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-563-8.
  45. Vol. 45 (ch. 379–386): September 2014 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395186-8. December 2014 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-564-5.
  46. Vol. 46 (ch. 387–394): November 2014 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395241-4. January 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-797-7.
  47. Vol. 47 (ch. 395–403): January 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-40-6395-287-2. March 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61262-798-4.
  48. Vol. 48 (ch. 404–412): March 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395343-5. May 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61-262819-6.
  49. Vol. 49 (ch. 413–420): May 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395406-7. July 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61-262985-8.
  50. Vol. 50 (ch. 421–429): July 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395435-7. September 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-61-262986-5.
  51. Vol. 51 (ch. 430–438): September 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395489-0. November 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236114-1.
  52. Vol. 52 (ch. 439–446): November 2015 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395538-5. January 2016 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236115-8.
  53. Vol. 53 (ch. 447–455): January 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395577-4. April 2016 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236126-4.
  54. Vol. 54 (ch. 456–464): March 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395626-9. June 2016 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236215-5.
  55. Vol. 55 (ch. 465–473): May 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395675-7. August 2015 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236262-9.
  56. Vol. 56 (ch. 474–482): July 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395715-0. September 2016 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236290-2.
  57. Vol. 57 (ch. 483–491): September 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395761-7. November 2016 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236291-9.
  58. Vol. 58 (ch. 492–500): November 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395804-1. February 2017 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236334-3.
  59. Vol. 59 (ch. 501–509): December 2016 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395831-7. March 2017 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236335-0.
  60. Vol. 60 (ch. 510–518): March 2017 (in Japanese). ISBN 978-4-06-395897-3. May 2017 (in English). ISBN 978-1-63-236336-7.

Happy (Fairy Tail)[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 1
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Rie Kugimiya
English
Tia Ballard

Happy (Japanese: ハッピー, Hepburn: Happī)

Reception[edit]

Happy ranked fourth in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Lucy Heartfilia[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 1
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Aya Hirano
English
Cherami Leigh
Portrayed by Ayu Manaka (musical)

Lucy Heartfilia (Japanese: ルーシィ・ハートフィリア, Hepburn: Rūshii Hātofiria)

Reception[edit]

Lucy has ranked within the top three characters in every official popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine, placing first in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Gray Fullbuster[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 2
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Yuichi Nakamura
Eri Kitamura (child)
English
Newton Pittman
Ryan Reynolds (child)
Portrayed by Atsushi Shiramata (musical)

Gray Fullbuster (Japanese: グレイ・フルバスター, Hepburn: Gurei Furubasutā)

Appearances[edit]

In the ensuing year, Gray trains alongside Juvia before being contacted by Erza to spy on Avatar, a cult of Zeref's worshippers. Gray joins the cult under the pretense of being corrupted by his demon slayer magic in a vain effort at gaining intel on E.N.D. He maintains this facade to his friends, convincing Natsu of a premonition that Gray would instigate Rogue Cheney's descent into villainy by murdering Frosch, Rogue's companion. Gray eventually rejoins his friends to annihilate the cult. Later, during the battle between Fiore's guilds and the Alvarez Empire, Gray discovers that Natsu and E.N.D. are the same entity. This, combined with Juvia's presumed death and his magic's corruptive influence, drives Gray to fight Natsu to the death. Erza disrupts their duel and, together with Wendy Marvell's revival of Juvia, returns both friends to their senses. Gray later attempts to use an enhanced version of Iced Shell against Zeref to atone for his actions, but is once again stopped by Natsu as a reaffirmation of their friendship.

Reception[edit]

Gray ranked sixth in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Erza Scarlet[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 10
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Sayaka Ohara
English
Colleen Clinkenbeard
Portrayed by Minami Tsukui (musical)

Erza Scarlet (Japanese: エルザ・スカーレット, Hepburn: Eruza Sukāretto)

Reception[edit]

Lucy has ranked within the top three characters in every official popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine, placing third in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Jellal Fernandez[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 77
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Daisuke Namikawa
English
Robert McCollum
Terri Doty (child)
Portrayed by Hirofumi Araki (musical)

Jellal Fernandez (Japanese: ジェラール・フェルナンデス, Hepburn: Jerāru Ferunandesu)

Appearances[edit]

Jellal's body is recovered by the Oración Seis, led by Jellal's former mentor Brain, who forces Wendy Marvell to revive him; she does so while mistaking him for Mystogan, her benefactor and his counterpart from the parallel world of Edolas. Upon reviving, Jellal suffers from amnesia and is horrified to learn of his atrocities from Erza. Convinced to atone, Jellal allies with Fairy Tail against the Seis. Despite his instrumental role in helping Natsu defeat Brain's alter ego Zero, Jellal is arrested by agents of the reorganized Council for his previous crimes.

Over the next seven years, Jellal is liberated from prison by a reformed Ultear and her accomplice Merudy, and the three form Crime Sorcière to eliminate Zeref's influence from the world. Their guild collaborates with Fairy Tail during the Grand Magic Games to investigate a presence identical to Zeref. Assuming Mystogan's identity during this time, Jellal participates in the Grand Magic Games tournament on Fairy Tail's "Team B" amidst competition from Millianna, his former follower at the Tower of Heaven, and Kagura Mikazuchi, Simon's sister, both of whom seek vengeance against Jellal.

Reception[edit]

Jellal ranked 11th in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Wendy Marvell[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 132
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Satomi Satō
English
Brittney Karbowski
Portrayed by Misaki Momose (musical)

Wendy Marvell (Japanese: ウェンディ・マーベル, Hepburn: Wendi Māberu)

Reception[edit]

Wendy ranked fifth in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014. 

Zeref[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 200
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Akira Ishida
English
Joel McDonald

Zeref Dragneel (Japanese: ゼレフ・ドラグニル, Hepburn: Zerefu Doraguniru), more commonly known by the mononym Zeref, is a fictional character and the central antagonist of the Fairy Tail manga series created by Hiro Mashima. Initially featuring as an unseen character, Zeref makes his first appearance midway through the story as an unaging, 400-year-old youth. Originally a kind prodigy who sought a means to undo death, Zeref is inflicted with a divine curse of immortality that moreover causes those around him to die whenever he cherishes life, gaining notoriety as a mass-murdering embodiment of evil known as the Black Wizard (黒魔道士, Kuro Madōshi). Thus, whilst growing disillusioned with mankind to the point of embracing his villainous legacy, he desires to be stopped by series protagonist Natsu Dragneel, who is later revealed as Zeref's younger brother, resurrected by Zeref as a demonic Etherious (エーテリアス, Ēteriasu) to carry out the purpose of killing him.

Creation and conception[edit]

Zeref's Japanese voice actor in the anime adaptation is Akira Ishida. Ishida felt that his performance as Zeref has not changed since the character has only made occasional appearances throughout the series. However, he also found the character to be interesting due to his mysterious background that is gradually revealed as the story progresses.[1] Joel McDonald provides the character's voice in the anime's English dub produced by Funimation.

Personality and attributes[edit]

Hiro Mashima described Zeref as "really dark [...] He'd never make a silly face."[vol. 26:afterword] In the series' narrative, Zeref suffers from a curse known as the Black Magic of Ankhselam (アンクセラムの黒魔術, Ankuseramu no Kuro Majutsu), also called the "curse of contradiction", which unwittingly kills everything around him whenever he cherishes the value of life. Conversely, abandoning this notion of life affords him full control of his deadly magic.[ch. 250] The curse also makes Zeref immortal, unable to age or die by virtually any means.

In most of his appearances, he initially wears a black (red in his early manga appearances) robe wrapped in a white sash. When he embraces his role as ruler of the Alvarez Empire, he begins wearing fanciful garments "more befitting an emperor".[ch. 466]

Appearances[edit]

Background[edit]

Zeref's backstory spans 400 years of the series' fictional history, much of which is revealed through flashbacks in chapters 436 and 465 of the manga. Growing up as the sole survivor of a dragon attack among his family, Zeref Dragneel studies as a child prodigy at Mildian's magic academy. There he develops various magic technologies designed to resurrect Natsu, his infant brother who was killed in the attack. His repeated efforts result in him being cursed by Ankhselam (アンクセラム, Ankuseramu), a deity of life and death, who burdens Zeref with immortality and the Black Magic of Ankhselam. Remorseful, Zeref creates numerous Etherious demons he hopes to be capable of killing him and ending his curse, eventually succeeding when he reanimates Natsu's body as a demon that he aptly dubs "Etherious Natsu Dragneel" (E.N.D.).[ch. 436] He later places Natsu under the care of the dragon Igneel, with whom Zeref cooperates in a plan to eliminate the murderous black dragon, Acnologia. Supplying an Eclipse time travel portal to Anna Heartfilia, a celestial wizard and ancestor of Lucy Heartfilia, Zeref sends Natsu and his fellow dragon slayers 400 years forward to the date of July 7, X777, seven years before the beginning of the main story.[ch. 465]

The prequel manga Fairy Tail Zero depicts Zeref's first encounter with Mavis Vermillion, his adversary and Fairy Tail's founding master, set 105 years before the main story's events. Mavis, oblivious to Zeref's identity, sympathizes with him over his curse and befriends him. In return for her kindness, Zeref teaches magic to Mavis and her companions, including the forbidden spell Law (ロウ, ), which she is forced to use to save her friends' lives. Their story continues in a flashback shown from chapters 449 through 451 of the main story, where Zeref begins building the Alvarez Empire to combat Acnologia.[ch. 450] Upon reuniting with Mavis, Zeref discovers that her use of Law has afflicted her with the same curse and immortality as him. Mavis remains empathetic towards Zeref, and the two fall in love. Upon kissing her, however, Zeref's curse sends Mavis into a deathlike coma, causing a heartbroken Zeref to fully give up on living.

In Fairy Tail[edit]

In other media[edit]

Reception[edit]

Since his introduction, Zeref's identity and role in the series have been a source of speculation. John Rose from The Fandom Post was disappointed by his introductory scene, feeling it played out more like a trope typical for the series rather "a trope from the genre than something that sets him apart in the series". He also criticized the reveal of his identity, calling it anti-climactic and considering Zeref to be "much less in person than was promised".[2] Rebecca Silverman of Anime News Network praised the added depth to Zeref's character via his romance with Mavis, saying "[Fairy Heart] is symbolic of Zeref's and Mavis' relationship in the past, as Mavis' heart is something Zeref yearned for but never really had". While discussing Mashima's "interesting" take on the "true love's kiss" cliché between the two characters, Silverman commented that "while Zeref may have loved Mavis with all of his heart, part of hers was occupied with her guild, and therefore her kiss did not have the same effect on his curse. Thus Mavis was freed while Zeref was forced to live on, his love for Mavis turning to ash in his mouth if not his heart".[3]

References[edit]

Mavis Vermillion[edit]

SubZeroSilver/Sandbox 4
Fairy Tail character
First appearance Fairy Tail manga chapter 253
Created by Hiro Mashima
Voiced by Japanese
Mamiko Noto
English
Leah Clark

Mavis Vermillion (Japanese: メイビス・ヴァーミリオン, Hepburn: Meibisu Vāmirion)

Creation and conception[edit]

Mavis' background was included in one of Hiro Mashima's very first concepts of the series.[vol. 31:bonus] Mashima's initial character concept for Mavis was that of an old man, which he hurriedly changed when he discovered that "Mavis" was a female name.[1] According to Mashima, his decision to design her as a young girl was done in order to surprise readers.[citation needed] In response to the character's "immense popularity" following her initial appearance, Mashima incorporated her into the story further than he originally intended, remarking that he had "no idea" she would become so popular.[vol. 32:afterword] While creating the story for the prequel manga Fairy Tail Zero, Mashima planned to depict Mavis as someone who initially hated guilds before gradually coming to love them. However, this concept was scrapped due to the manga's page limit.[citation needed]

Reception[edit]

Mavis ranked 18th in a popularity poll conducted by Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2014.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://twitter.com/hiro_mashima/status/272695411637116930
  2. ^ 週刊少年マガジン2014年26号. Weekly Shōnen Magazine. Kodansha. June 11, 2014.