Vice President of Bolivia

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The Vice President of the Plurinational State of Bolivia (Spanish: Vicepresidente del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia) or Vice President of Bolivia (Spanish: Vicepresidente de Bolivia), is the second highest political position in Bolivia. The Vice President replaces the President in his definitive absence or others impediment and is the President of the Legislative Assembly.

The first Vice President of Bolivia was José Ramón de Loayza, elected by President Pedro Blanco and by the Conventional Assembly in 1828. The Constitution of 1839 eliminated the Vice President position, a situation that lasted until 1878, when a new Constitution under Hilarión Daza reincorporated the Vice President position, but no Vice Presidents were elected until 1880.

The Constitution of 1880 incorporated the figure of two Vice Presidents, who were elected like the President by direct vote, but with different powers: The First Vice President presided over the Senate and was empowered to replace or succeed the President, The Second Vice President only had the function of replacing or succeeding the President, in case of absence, resignation, inability or death of the First Vice President. This dual form of the Vice Presidents, was in force until 1921 when the Congress-Convention of 1921, convened by Bautista Saavedra abolished the double Vice Presidency.

The unconstitutional government of Carlos Quintanilla amended the Constitution removing the position of Vice President, by a simple decree. This made that Enrique Peñaranda was elected without a Vice President. This lasted until 1945 when the Congress appointed Julián Montellano as Vice President of Gualberto Villarroel.[1]

List of Vice Presidents of Bolivia[edit]

Single Vice Presidency (1828–1880)[edit]

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office President Notes
R.
Start End
1 Loazya.jpg José Ramón de Loayza Pacheco
(1751–1839)
18 December 1828 1 January 1829 Himself [2]
Pedro Blanco Soto
Vacant
1 January 1829 – 24 May 1829
José Miguel de Velasco
2 José Miguel de Velasco Franco.jpg José Miguel de Velasco
(1795–1859)
24 May 1829 23 July 1835 Andrés de Santa Cruz [3]
3 Mariano Calvo.jpg Mariano Enrique Calvo
(1782–1842)
23 July 1835 17 February 1839 [4]
Vacant
17 February 1839 – 26 October 1839
José Miguel de Velasco The Constitution of 1839 eliminates the Vice President position.
Position abolished
26 October 1839 – 15 February 1878
Vacant
15 February 1878 – 28 October 1880
Hilarión Daza The Constitution of 1878 reincorporates the Vice President position.
Narciso Campero

Double Vice Presidency (1880–1921)[edit]

Title Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Party Elected President Notes
R.
Start End
Vacant
28 October 1880 – 31 May 1880
Narciso Campero The Constitution of 1880 incorporates the Double Vice Presidency.
1st Vice
President
4 Aniceto Arce.jpg Aniceto Arce
(1824–1906)
31 May 1880 11 March 1881 Conservative Appointed by the National Convention as Vice President for 4 years. Sentenced to banishment by Narciso Campero. [5]
Vacant
11 March 1881 – 4 September 1884
2nd Vice
President
5 Belisario salinas belzu.jpg Belisario Salinas Belzu
(1833–1893)
31 May 1880 4 September 1884 Conservative Appointed by the National Convention as Vice President for 4 years. [6]
1st Vice
President
6 Mariano Baptista Caserta.jpg Mariano Baptista
(1832–1907)
4 September 1884 15 August 1888 Democratic 1884 Gregorio Pacheco [7]
2nd Vice
President
7 Jorge Oblitas.jpg Jorge Oblitas
(1831–1900)
4 September 1884 15 August 1888 Democratic [8]
1st Vice
President
8 José Manuel del Carpio.jpg José Manuel del Carpio
(?–?)
15 August 1888 4 August 1892 Conservative 1888 Aniceto Arce [9]
Vacant
4 August 1892 – 11 August 1892
2nd Vice
President
9 Serapio reyes ortiz.jpg Serapio Reyes Ortiz
(1822–1900)
15 August 1888 11 August 1892 Conservative [10]
1st Vice
President
10 SEVERO FERNÁNDEZ ALONSO CABALLERO.jpg Severo Fernández
(1849–1925)
11 August 1892 19 August 1896 Conservative 1892 Mariano Baptista [11]
2nd Vice
President
Juan Federico Zuazo
(1825–1892)
Died before taking office Conservative
1st Vice
President
11 Rafael Peña de Flores.jpg Rafael Peña de Flores
(1822–1901)
19 August 1896 12 April 1899 Conservative 1896 Severo Fernández Ousted from office by the Federal Revolution of 1899. [12]
2nd Vice
President
12 Jenaro Sanjinés Calderón.jpg Jenaro Sanjinés Calderón
(1843–1913)
19 August 1896 12 April 1899 Conservative Ousted from office by the Federal Revolution of 1899. [13]
Vacant
12 April 1899 – 25 October 1899
Federal Government Junta (es)
1st Vice
President
13 Lucio Pérez Velasco.jpg Lucio Pérez Velasco
(1854–1904)
25 October 1899 24 January 1903 Liberal José Manuel Pando Appointed by the National Convention as Vice President for 4 years. Sentenced to banishment by José Manuel Pando. [14]
Vacant
24 January 1903 – 14 August 1904
2nd Vice
President
14 Aníbal Capriles Cabrera.jpg Aníbal Capriles Cabrera
(1854–1924)
25 October 1899 14 August 1904 Liberal Appointed by the National Convention as Vice President for 4 years. [15]
1st Vice
President
15 Eliodoro Villazón con banda presidencial.jpg Eliodoro Villazón
(1848–1939)
14 August 1904 12 August 1909 Liberal 1904 Ismael Montes [16]
2nd Vice
President
16 V.Abecia A..jpg Valentín Abecia Ayllón
(1846–1910)
14 August 1904 12 August 1909 Liberal [17]
1st Vice
President
17 M.pinilla.jpg Macario Pinilla Vargas
(1855–1927)
12 August 1909 14 August 1913 Liberal 1909 Eliodoro Villazón [18]
2nd Vice
President
18 Saracho.jpg Juan Misael Saracho
(1857–1915)
12 August 1909 14 August 1913 Liberal [19]
1st Vice
President
(18) Saracho.jpg Juan Misael Saracho
(1857–1915)
14 August 1913 1 October 1915 Liberal 1913 Ismael Montes Died in office. [19]
Vacant
1 October 1915 – 15 August 1917
2nd Vice
President
19 José Carrasco Torrico.jpg José Carrasco Torrico
(1863–1921)
14 August 1913 15 August 1917 Liberal [20]
1st Vice
President
20 Ismael Vázquez Virreira.jpg Ismael Vázquez Virreira
(1865–1930)
15 August 1917 12 July 1920 Liberal 1917 José Gutiérrez Guerra Ousted from office by a coup d'état. [21]
2nd Vice
President
21 José Santos Quinteros.jpg José Santos Quinteros
(1865–1951)
15 August 1917 12 July 1920 Liberal Ousted from office by a coup d'état. [22]
Vacant
13 July 1920 – 24 January 1921
Transitional Government Junta (es)

Single Vice Presidency (1921–Present)[edit]

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Party Elected President Notes
R.
Start End
Vacant
24 January 1921 – 10 January 1926
Transitional Government Junta (es) The Convention of 1921 abolished the double Vice Presidency.
Bautista Saavedra
Felipe Segundo Guzmán
22 Abdon saavedra.jpg Abdón Saavedra
(1872–1942)
10 January 1926 28 May 1930 Socialist Republican Dec.1925 Hernando Siles Reyes [23]
Vacant
28 May 1930 – 5 March 1931
Council of Ministers
Carlos Galindo
23 Jose luis tejada sorzano.jpg José Luis Tejada Sorzano
(1882–1938)
5 March 1931 27 November 1934 Genuine Republican 1931 Daniel Salamanca Urey Assumed the presidency after the resignation of Daniel Salamanca Urey. [24]
Vacant
28 November 1934 – 28 May 1938
Tejada Sorzano
David Toro
Germán Busch
24 Enrique Baldivieso.jpg Enrique Baldivieso
(1902–1957)
28 May 1938 24 April 1939 Appointed by the National Assembly as Vice President. Ousted from office by a self-coup of Germán Busch. [25]
Vacant
24 April 1939 – 4 December 1939
Carlos Quintanilla
Position abolished
4 December 1939 – 6 November 1945
Carlos Quintanilla amends the Constitution removing the position of Vice President.
Enrique Peñaranda
Gualberto Villarroel
25 Julian V.montellano.jpg Julián Montellano
(1900–1989)
6 November 1945 21 July 1946 Appointed by the National Assembly as Vice President. Ousted from office by a coup d'état. [26]
Vacant
21 July 1946 – 10 March 1947
Néstor Guillén
Tomás Monje
26 Mamer-urriol.jpg Mamerto Urriolagoitía
(1895–1974)
10 March 1947 17 October 1949 Republican Socialist Unity 1947 Enrique Hertzog Assumed the presidency after the resignation of Enrique Hertzog. [27]
Vacant
17 October 1949 – 15 April 1952
Mamerto Urriolagoitía
Hugo Ballivián
Hernán Siles Zuazo
27 Hernán Siles Zuazo.jpg Hernán Siles Zuazo
(1914–1996)
15 April 1952 6 August 1956 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement Víctor Paz Estenssoro [28]
28 Ñuflo chavez ortiz.jpg Ñuflo Chávez Ortiz
(1923–1996)
6 August 1956 24 June 1957 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement 1956 Hernán Siles Zuazo Resigned. [29]
Vacant
24 June 1957 – 6 August 1960
29 Juan Lechín Oquendo.jpg Juan Lechín Oquendo
(1914–2001)
6 August 1960 6 August 1964 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement 1960 Víctor Paz Estenssoro [30]
30 Rene barrientos.jpg René Barrientos
(1919–1969)
6 August 1964 4 November 1964 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement 1964 Outsed Víctor Paz Estenssoro in a coup d'état. [31]
Vacant
4 November 1964 – 6 August 1966
René Barrientos
Alfredo Ovando Candía
31 Siles Salinas.jpg Luis Adolfo Siles Salinas
(1925–2005)
6 August 1966 27 April 1969 Social Democratic 1966 René Barrientos Assumed the presidency after the death of René Barrientos. [32]
Vacant
27 April 1969 – 10 October 1982
32 Jaime paz zamora.jpg Jaime Paz Zamora
(1939–)
10 October 1982 14 December 1984 Democratic and Popular Union 1980 Hernán Siles Zuazo Resigned to run for presidency. [33]
Vacant
14 December 1984 – 6 August 1985
33 Julio Garrett Ayllón
(1925–)
6 August 1985 6 August 1989 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement 1985 Víctor Paz Estenssoro [34]
34 Luis Ossio
(1930–2016)
6 August 1989 6 August 1993 Revolutionary Left Movement 1989 Jaime Paz Zamora [35]
35 Víctor Hugo Cárdenas
(1951–)
6 August 1993 6 August 1997 Revolutionary Nationalist Movement 1993 Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada [36]
36 Jorge Quiroga-1.jpg Jorge Quiroga
(1960–)
6 August 1997 7 August 2001 Nationalist Democratic Action 1997 Hugo Banzer Assumed the presidency after the resignation of Hugo Banzer. [37]
Vacant
7 August 2001 – 6 August 2002
Jorge Quiroga
37 Carlos Mesa.jpg Carlos Mesa
(1953–)
6 August 2002 17 October 2003 2002 Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada Assumed the presidency after the resignation of Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada. [38]
Vacant
17 October 2003 – 22 January 2006
Carlos Mesa
Eduardo Rodríguez
38 Álvaro García Linera - Participante del Foro Internacional por la Emancipación y la Igualdad 2011 (cropped).jpg Álvaro García Linera
(1962–)
22 January 2006 22 January 2010 Movement for Socialism 2005 Evo Morales [39]
22 January 2010 22 January 2015 2009
22 January 2015 Incumbent
(Term ends on 22 January 2020)
2014

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Historia". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  2. ^ "1828-1829 José Ramón de Loayza Pacheco". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  3. ^ "1829-1835 José Miguel de Velasco Franco". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  4. ^ "1835-1839 Mariano Enrique Calvo Cuellar". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  5. ^ "1880-1881 Aniceto Arce Ruiz". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  6. ^ "1880-1884 Belisario Salinas Belzu". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  7. ^ "1884-1888 Mariano Baptista Caserta". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  8. ^ "1884-1888 Jorge Oblitas". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  9. ^ "1888-1892 Jose Manuel del Carpio". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  10. ^ "1888-1892 Serapio Reyes Ortiz". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  11. ^ "1892-1896 Severo Fernández Alonso". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  12. ^ "1896-1899 Rafael Peña de Flores". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  13. ^ "1896-1899 Jenaro Sanjinés Calderón". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  14. ^ "1899-1903 Lucio Peréz Velasco". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  15. ^ "1899-1904 Aníbal Capriles Cabrera". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  16. ^ "1904-1909 Eliodoro Villazón Montaño". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  17. ^ "1904-1909 Valentín Abecia Ayllón". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  18. ^ "1909-1913 Macario Pinilla Vargas". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  19. ^ a b "1909-1913 Juan Misael Saracho". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  20. ^ "1913-1917 José Carrasco Torrico". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  21. ^ "1917-1920 Ismael Vásquez Virreira". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  22. ^ "1917-1920 José Santos Quinteros". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  23. ^ "1926-1930 Abdón Saavedra Mallea". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  24. ^ "1931-1934 José Luis Tejada Sorzano". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  25. ^ "1938-1939 Enrique Baldivieso Aparicio". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  26. ^ "1945-1946 Julián V. Montellano Carrasco". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  27. ^ "1947-1949 Mamerto Urriolagoitia Harriague". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  28. ^ "1952-1956 Hernán Siles Zuazo". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  29. ^ "1956-1957 Ñuflo Chávez Ortiz". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  30. ^ "1960-1964 Juan Lechín Oquendo". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  31. ^ "1964 René Barrientos Ortuño". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  32. ^ "1966-1969 Luis Adolfo Siles Salinas". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  33. ^ "1982-1984 Jaime Paz Zamora". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  34. ^ "1985-1989 Julio Garret Ayllón". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  35. ^ "1989-1993 Luis Ossio Sanjinéz". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  36. ^ "1993-1997 Víctor Hugo Cardenas Conde". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  37. ^ "1997-2001 Jorge Quiroga Ramírez". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  38. ^ "2002-2003 Carlos Mesa Gisbert". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 
  39. ^ "2006-2009 Álvaro García Linera". Vicepresidencia del Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]