1903 in South Africa

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1903 in South Africa
1900 1901 1902 « 1903 » 1904 1905 1906

Years in South Africa

Events[edit]

February
March
  • 12 – Andries Dreyer, an archivist of the Dutch Reformed Church, is ordained as a missionary of the congregation for the Hanover Street area in Cape Town.
May
  • 21 – The first contingent of Chinese labourers leave China to work on the Witwatersrand gold mines.
June
  • 4 – The Indian Opinion is started by Mahatma Gandhi with Mansukhlal Nazar as editor.
Unknown date
  • The County of Pembroke, a British cargo ship, is shipwrecked near Port Elizabeth.

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

  • 13 March – General David Johannes Joubert (Ou Kat), a South African explorer to East Africa, dies of malaria near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

Railways[edit]

Railway lines opened[edit]

  • 19 February – Cape Central – Swellendam to Riversdale, 64 miles (103.0 kilometres).[1]
  • 28 February – Cape Western – Kalbaskraal to Hopefield (Narrow gauge), 46 miles 69 chains (75.4 kilometres).[1]
  • 22 March – Free State – Sannaspos to Thaba 'Nchu, 17 miles 3 chains (27.4 kilometres).[1]
  • 1 April – Free State – Harrismith to Aberfeldy, 20 miles 60 chains (33.4 kilometres).[1]
  • 27 April – Transvaal – India Junction to Driehoek (avoiding line), 55 chains (1.1 kilometres).[1]
  • 17 September – Natal – Mhlatuze to Somkele, 55 miles 17 chains (88.9 kilometres).[1]
  • 1 November – Transvaal – India Junction to New Canada, 14 miles 31 chains (23.2 kilometres).[1]
  • 12 November – Natal – Talana to Lucas Meyer, 50 miles 64 chains (81.8 kilometres).[1]
  • 14 December – Cape Eastern – King William's Town to Middledrift, 31 miles 17 chains (50.2 kilometres).[1]
  • 14 December – Cape Midland – Cookhouse to Adelaide, 42 miles 2 chains (67.6 kilometres).[1]
  • 14 December – Cape Midland – Willowmore to Le Roux, 75 miles 54 chains (121.8 kilometres).[1]

Locomotives[edit]

Cape
Transvaal
  • Three new Cape gauge locomotive types enter service on the Central South African Railways (CSAR):
    • Six Reid Tenwheeler 4-10-2 tank locomotives are converted to a 4-8-2T configuration by removing the fifth pair of coupled wheels to make them better suitable for yard work. In 1912 they will be designated Class H1 on the SAR.[5]:136[3]:32, 56
    • Thirty Class 8-L2 4-8-0 Mastodon type locomotives. In 1912 they will be designated Class 8B on the SAR.[2]:56, 127[3]:48-49
    • Thirty Class 8-L3 4-8-0 Mastodon type locomotives. In 1912 they will be designated Class 8C on the SAR.[2]:128[3]:48-49

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Statement Showing, in Chronological Order, the Date of Opening and the Mileage of Each Section of Railway, Statement No. 19, p. 184, ref. no. 200954-13
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Holland, D.F. (1971). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways, Volume 1: 1859-1910 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 978-0-7153-5382-0. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Paxton, Leith; Bourne, David (1985). Locomotives of the South African Railways (1st ed.). Cape Town: Struik. ISBN 0869772112. 
  4. ^ a b c Classification of S.A.R. Engines with Renumbering Lists, issued by the Chief Mechanical Engineer’s Office, Pretoria, January 1912, pp. 9, 12, 15, 36 (Reprinted in April 1987 by SATS Museum, R.3125-6/9/11-1000)
  5. ^ a b c Holland, D.F. (1972). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways, Volume 2: 1910-1955 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. ISBN 978-0-7153-5427-8. 
  6. ^ Dulez, Jean A. (2012). Railways of Southern Africa 150 Years (Commemorating One Hundred and Fifty Years of Railways on the Sub-Continent - Complete Motive Power Classifications and Famous Trains - 1860-2011) (1st ed.). Garden View, Johannesburg, South Africa: Vidrail Productions. ISBN 9 780620 512282.