ABC (newspaper)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from ABC (Spain))
Jump to: navigation, search
ABC
Diario ABC logo.svg
20090602 abc frontpage.jpg
Front page, 2 June 2009
Type Daily newspaper
Format Compact
Owner(s) Grupo Vocento
Founder(s) Torcuato Luca de Tena y Alvarez-Ossorio
Publisher Catalina Luca de Tena
Editor Ángel Expósito
Founded 1 January 1903
Political alignment Conservativism, Monarchism, Right wing
Language Spanish
Headquarters Juan Ignacio de Tena 7, Madrid, Spain
Circulation 243,154 (2011)
Website www.abc.es

ABC is a Spanish national daily newspaper published in Spain. It is the third largest general-interest newspaper in Spain, and the oldest newspaper still operating in Madrid. ABC is often referred to as a newspaper of record from Spain, along with El País and El Mundo.

History and profile[edit]

ABC was first published in Madrid on 1 January 1903[1] by Torcuato Luca de Tena y Álvarez-Ossorio.[2] The paper started as a weekly newspaper, turning daily in June 1905.[3]

On 20 July 1936, shortly after the Spanish Civil War began, ABC in Madrid was seized by the republican government, which changed the paper's politics to support the Republicans. A separate ABC printed in Seville supported the Nationalists. In 1939 ABC in Madrid was given back to its original owners, by Francisco Franco,[2] and once again became the largest newspaper in Spain, serving and supporting Franco's dictatorship.

It later moved from its historic landmark offices in Madrid by Paseo de la Castellana, which are now a shopping mall. The paper is part of Grupo Vocento.[4][5]

In the late 1970s and 1980s ABC had close connections with first Popular Alliance and later Popular Party.[6]

On 25 September 2009, ABC made its complete archives, dating back to 1903, available online, giving modern readers a chance to see contemporaneous news about the Spanish Civil War or Francisco Franco's death.

ABC publishes in compact-sized stapled sheets, noticeably smaller than the loose tabloid format favoured by most Spanish dailies, including El País and El Mundo. Its cover distinctively features a full-size picture.

Its director since 1983, Luis María Ansón, left in 1998 to found another daily, La Razón, which initially catered to even more conservative readers. ABC is known for generally supporting conservative political views[7] and defending the Spanish monarchy.[8] The paper has also a right-wing stance.[9]

Historically, it was noted in its heavy use of photography, and the front page is typically a large photo taking up to one third of the area. Recently, it has been recognized for its coverage of Spanish culture and arts.[2]

From 1975 to 1978 ABC had the highest circulation in Spain.[1] It was 187,484 copies in 1975, 171,382 copies in 1976, 145,162 copies in 1977 and 126,952 in 1978.[1] In the period of 1995–1996 the paper had a circulation of 321,573 copies, making it the second best-selling paper in the country.[10] ABC had a circulation of 263,000 copies in 2003, being the fourth best-selling newspaper in the country.[11] Between June 2006 and July 2007 the paper had a circulation of 230,422 copies.[3] The 2008 circulation of the paper was 228,258 copies.[12] It was 243,154 copies between July 2010 and June 2011.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Katrin Voltmer (2006). Mass Media and Political Communication in New Democracies. Psychology Press. p. 19. ISBN 978-0-415-33779-3. Retrieved 30 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c "ABC". Encyclopedia Britannica. I: A-Ak - Bayes (15th ed.). Chicago, IL: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. 2010. p. 14. ISBN 978-1-59339-837-8. 
  3. ^ a b Andrea Czepek; Melanie Hellwig; Eva Nowak (2009). Press Freedom and Pluralism in Europe: Concepts and Conditions. Intellect Books. p. 275. ISBN 978-1-84150-243-4. Retrieved 12 December 2014. 
  4. ^ Andreu Casero-Ripollés; Jessica Izquierdo-Castillo (2013). "Between Decline and a New Online Business Model: The Case of the Spanish Newspaper Industry". Journal of Media Business Studies 10 (1): 63–78. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  5. ^ Enric Castelló; David Domingo (2005). "Spanish media facing new media: a challenge to journalists?". International Journal of Iberian Studies 18 (3). Retrieved 3 December 2014. 
  6. ^ Frank R. Baumgartner; Laura Chaqués Bonafont (2014). "All News is Bad News: Newspaper Coverage of Political Parties in Spain". Political Communication. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  7. ^ Bogusława Dobek-Ostrowska et. al. (2010). Comparative Media Systems: European and Global Perspectives. Budapest: Central European University Press. Retrieved 1 December 2014.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  8. ^ Richard Gunther; Jose Ramon Montero; Jose Ignacio Wert (2000). "The media and politics in Spain". In Richard Gunther; Anthony Mughan. Democracy and the Media: A Comparative Perspective. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 27 November 2014. 
  9. ^ Dan Beeton (22 July 2013). "Spanish Newspaper ABC Runs a “Completely False” Report on Venezuela, Again". CEPR. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  10. ^ Media Policy: Convergence, Concentration & Commerce. SAGE Publications. 24 September 1998. p. 7. ISBN 978-1-4462-6524-6. Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  11. ^ Roland Schroeder (2004). "Interactive Info Graphics in Europe-- added value to online mass media: a preliminary survey". Journalism Studies 5 (4). doi:10.1080/14616700412331296473. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  12. ^ Alan Albarran (10 September 2009). Handbook of Spanish Language Media. Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 978-1-135-85430-0. Retrieved 29 October 2014. 
  13. ^ Figures covering July 2010 to June 2011 from Spain's Oficina de Justificación de la Difusión, Retrieved 28 January 2012.

External links[edit]

  • ABC.es – official online version of ABC
  • The ABC – Article in English discussing ABC