Carrier Strike Group One

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Carrier Strike Group One
CARSTRKGRU 1.png
Carrier Strike Group One emblem
Active 1 October 2009 – Present.[1]
Country United States of America
Branch United States Navy Seal United States Navy
Type Carrier Strike Group
Role Naval air/surface warfare
Part of U.S. Third Fleet
Garrison/HQ Naval Air Station North Island[2]
Nickname Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group
Motto Virtute et Armis ("By Valor and Arms")[Note 1]
Engagements War in Afghanistan
Iraq War
Operation Inherent Resolve
Commanders
Commander Rear Admiral Christopher Grady[3][4]
Chief of Staff Captain Robert Sanders[5]
Command Master Chief Master Chief Petty Officer Toby Cadwell[6]
Aircraft flown
Electronic
warfare
EA-18G Growler[7]
E-2C Hawkeye[7]
Fighter F/A-18E/F Super Hornet
F/A-18C Hornet[7]
Helicopter MH-60S Knighthawk[7]
MH-60R Seahawk[7]
Transport C-2A Greyhound[7]

Carrier Strike Group One, abbreviated as CSG-1 or CARSTRKGRU 1, is one of five U.S. Navy carrier strike groups currently assigned to the United States Pacific Fleet. Carrier strike groups gain and maintain sea control[8] as well as project naval airpower ashore.

USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) is the strike group's current flagship, and as of 2012, other units assigned include Carrier Air Wing Seventeen; the Ticonderoga-class cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Lake Champlain (CG-57); and the ships of Destroyer Squadron 1.[Note 2][1][9]

Although the previous Carrier Strike Group One traced its history to Carrier Division 1, formed in 1930, this current Carrier Strike Group One is an entirely new naval formation when it was established in October 2009. During the relocation of its flagship Carl Vinson to its new home base in California, Carrier Strike Group One supported Operation Unified Response, providing humanitarian assistance following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. During its first overseas deployment in 2011, the body of Osama bin Laden was flown to the Carl Vinson for burial at sea.

Historical background[edit]

Carrier Strike Group One traces its lineage to Carrier Division 1 (CarDiv 1), the U.S. Navy's first seagoing naval aviation formation. It was first organized in October 1930 as part of the Aircraft Scouting Force, U.S. Fleet in the Atlantic. It initially included the U.S. Navy's first aircraft carrier, the Langley, as well as the aircraft tender Wright and the minesweepers Sandpiper and Teal.[10] In 1933, USS Saratoga (CV-3) was re-assigned to Carrier Division One under Commander Aircraft, Scouting Force, which also included aircraft tender Wright; the minesweepers Lapwing, Teal, and Swan; and the rigid airships Akron and Macon. Carrier Division One was initially headquartered at the Coco Solo Naval Air Station located on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal Zone near Colón, Panama.[11] In 1939, Carrier Division One was transferred to the Pacific Scouting Force. Division aircraft carriers saw service in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.[10]

Rear Admiral John H. Cassady served as Commander Carrier Division 1 immediately after the end of Second World War. In this capacity, Cassady commanded Task Group 21.11, led by the carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt, during Operation Frostbite in February 1946. This naval exercise involved the embarked Air Group 74 conducting flight operations in Davis Straits between Labrador and Greenland. Previously, U.S. Naval carrier aviation had virtually no experience operating in Arctic waters.[12][13] Subsequently, Admiral Cassady commanded Task Group 125.4, consisting of the carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt; the cruiser Little Rock; and the destroyers New, Cone, and Corry, which paid a highly publicized port visit to Piraeus, Greece, in September 1946.[14][15] In conjunction with earlier visits, including that of USS Missouri (BB-63) to Turkey, this port call demonstrated U.S. support to Greece and Turkey in the face of Soviet pressure. According to James Chace, the deployment of Task Group 125.4 "symbolized" American resolve against that Soviet pressure, marking the true beginning of the Cold War.[16] In 1952 Commander Carrier Division 1 was flying his flag aboard USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31) off Korea. In August 1955, Carrier Division 1 comprised USS Yorktown (CV-10) at Puget Sound (in refit, receiving an angled flight deck), USS Hornet (CV-12) at San Francisco, and USS Hancock (CV-19), and USS Boxer (CV-21) both at San Diego.[17]

In June 1973, Carrier Division 1 was redesignated Carrier Group 1 (CarGru 1), and in January 1974, it was located at North Island, California.[18] Despite being headquartered at North Island, it was responsible for the Midway, which with Carrier Air Wing Five aboard had moved to United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, on 5 October 1973.[19] The move was the result of an accord signed on 31 August 1972 between the U.S. and Japan. In addition to the morale factor of dependents housed alongside with the crew, the move allowed continuous positioning of three carriers on the Pacific Rim at a time when the economic situation demanded the reduction of carriers in the fleet. In December 1990, following commanding Battle Group Delta, ComCarGru 1 was designated Commander, Training Battle Group, with responsibility for the Carrier Battle Group Inter-Deployment Training Cycle for the Pacific Fleet.[10] In 1996 the group was commanded by Timothy Beard.

On 1 October 2004, Carrier Group 1 became Carrier Strike Group 1.[20] In 2005, it was redesignated Commander, Strike Force Training Pacific.[21] On 1 October 2009, Carrier Strike Group 1 was re-established based at Naval Base San Diego, California under Rear Admiral Ted N. Branch.[1]

Command structure[edit]

Commander Carrier Strike Group One (COMCARSTRKGRU 1 or CCSG 1) is responsible for unit-level training, integrated training, and material readiness for the ships and aviation squadrons assigned to the group. Carrier Strike Group One reports to Commander, U.S. Third Fleet, which also supervises its pre-deployment training and certification that includes Composite Unit Training Exercises. When deployed overseas, the strike group comes under the command authority of the numbered fleet in whose area it is operating (Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, or Seventh Fleets). When deployed in this fashion, the group utilizes a task force or task group designator, for example, Task Group 50.1 in the Fifth Fleet area.

Group commanders since 2009 have included:

  • Rear Admiral Ted N. Branch   (1 October 2009 – 26 October 2010)[1][22]
  • Rear Admiral Samuel Perez, Jr.   (26 October 2010 – 18 November 2011)[22][23]
  • Rear Admiral Thomas K. Shannon   (18 November 2011 – 21 February 2013)[23][24]
  • Rear Admiral David F. Steindl   ( 21 February 2013 – 28 January 2014)[3][24]
  • Rear Admiral Christopher Grady   ( 28 January 2014 – Present)[3]

Operational history[edit]

2010 operations[edit]

Operation Unified Response: Carl Vinson operating off the coast of Haiti (15 January 2010)

On 12 January 2010, Carl Vinson, departed Naval Station Norfolk for its new homeport of San Diego with squadrons VFA-81, VAW-125, VRC-40, and HS-15 embarked.[25][26]

Just hours after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, Carl Vinson was redirected from the North Atlantic to Haiti to contribute to the Operation Unified Response relief effort.[27] On 15 January, the Carl Vinson arrived off the coast of Port-au-Prince (pictured) to provide humanitarian aid, with its trained personnel, emergency relief supplies, and 19 helicopters on deck.[28] On 16 January, the Bunker Hill arrived in Haiti to assist the Carl Vinson.[29] In addition to providing medical relief, Carl Vinson '​s desalination capacity provided fresh drinkable water to Haiti's population.[30] In total, the Carl Vinson delivered 1,095,442 lbs. (496,884 kg.) of food; 147,591 gallons (558,693 litres) of potable water; and more than 40,000 lbs. (18,143 kg.) of medical supplies. The ship's medical team treated 60 patients. The Vinson '​s embarked helicopters flew 1,299 sorties, conducted 1,152 medical evacuations, and delivered more than 2,900,000 lbs. (1,315,418 kg.) of cargo ashore.[22][31][32] On 1 February, the Carl Vinson, the cruiser Bunker Hill, and the oceanographic survey ship Henson ended their mission and departed Haiti although ten of Vinson '​s helicopters remained to support the relief effort.[33]

In March 2010, during her transit around South America, the carrier strike group participated in Southern Seas 2010 naval maneuvers with the Brazilian, Uruguayan, and Argentine navies.[32][34][35] The group also paid port visits to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Callao, Peru.[26][32][36] Carl Vinson arrived at its new homeport on 12 April 2010 following a three-month underway period.[25][32]

2010–2011 deployment[edit]

Full City incident (5 May 2011)

On 26 October 2010, Rear Admiral Samuel Perez, Jr. took command of the group.[23] On 30 November 2010, Carrier Strike Group One departed Naval Air Station North Island, California, for its 2010–2011 deployment.[37] During the deployment, Carrier Air Wing Seventeen flew 1,656 combat air sorties, logging a total of 9,140 flight hours while 33 bombs and 2,970 rounds of 20-mm ammunition were expended.[38] On 2 May 2011, following Operation Neptune's Spear, the body of Osama bin Laden, the founder of the al-Qaeda terror group, was flown out by a MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft to the carrier Carl Vinson operating in the Northern Arabian Sea, and the body was subsequently buried at sea after religious rites were conducted aboard the Vinson.[39]

On 5 May 2011, as part of NATO's counter-piracy Operation Ocean Shield, the carrier Carl Vinson, the cruiser Bunker Hill, and the Turkish frigate Giresun responded to a distress call from the Panamanian-flagged, Chinese-owned bulk carrier Full City. An Indian Navy Tu-142 maritime patrol aircraft located the Full City, and while Giresun boarded the merchant vessel, Bunker Hill and its embarked HS-49 helicopters intercepted a dhow believed to be the 'mothership' for the pirate attack (pictured). Bunker Hill '​s VBSS boarding party seized weapons and other equipment commonly used in piracy, and the boarding party also sank a small skiff being towed by the dhow. Giresun '​s boarding party found the Full City '​s Chinese crew safe and in control of their ship.[38][40][41][42] On 15 June 2011, Carl Vinson returned to its homeport of Naval Station San Diego, California.[43]

2010–2011 deployment force composition[37][44][45][46][47]
CARSTRKGRU 1 Warships Carrier Air Wing Seventeen (CVW-17) squadrons embarked aboard flagship USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)
USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) Strike Fighter Squadron 113 (VFA-113): 10 F/A-18C Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron 134 (VAQ-134): 4 EA-6B
USS Stockdale (DDG-106) Strike Fighter Squadron 81 (VFA-81): 10 F/A-18E Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 (VAW-125): 4 E-2C
USS Gridley (DDG-101) Strike Fighter Squadron 25 (VFA-25): 10 F/A-18C Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 15 (HS-15): 7 HH-60F/SH-60F
USS Higgins (DDG-76) Strike Fighter Squadron 22 (VFA-22): 12 F/A-18F Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 (VRC-40), Det.4: 2 C-2A
2010–2011 deployment exercises and port visits
Number Regional Exercises Port Visits Notes
Duration U.S. Force Bilateral/Multilateral Partner(s) Operating Area Location Dates
1st: 10 Jan 2011 Stockdale, Gridley PASSEX: Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, Republic of Korea Navy Sea of Japan —- —- [48]
2nd: —- Carrier Strike Group One —- —- Chinhae & Busan, ROK 11–14 Jan 2011 [49][50][51][52]
3rd: 26 Jan 2011 Carrier Strike Group One PASSEX: Royal Malaysian Navy Straits of Malacca —- —- [53]
4th: —- Higgins —- —- Phuket, Thailand 17–21 Feb 2011 [54]
5th: 25–26 Feb 2011 Higgins Maritime Domain Awareness: Maldivian Coast Guard In-port Maldives 25–26 Feb 2011 [44]
6th: —- Carrier Strike Group One —- —- Port Klang, Malaysia 13 Feb 2011 [55]
7th: —- Carrier Strike Group One —- —- Manila, Philippines 15–19 May 2011 [56][57][58][59]
8th: —- Carrier Strike Group One —- —- Hong Kong 22–24 May 2011 [60]
9th: —- Carrier Strike Group One —- —- Pearl Harbor-Hickam 7–9 June 2011 [61]

2011–2012 deployment[edit]

On 18 November 2011, Rear Admiral Thomas K. Shannon took command of Carrier Strike Group One.[23] On 30 November 2011, the strike group departed Naval Air Station North Island, California, for its 2011–2012 deployment.[62][63]

On 10 January 2011, two guided-missile destroyers from Destroyer Squadron One, Stockdale and Gridley, and their embarked detachments from helicopter squadron HSL-49 participated in a passing exercise with the Japanese helicopter destroyer Kurama in the Sea of Japan. Later in the same day, Stockdale and Gridley participated in separate maneuvers with units of the Republic of Korea Navy.[48] Also, during its maiden deployment, the new British guided-missile destroyer Daring operated with Carrier Strike Group One and Carrier Strike Group Nine in the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea.[64] On 19 January 2012, while serving as the flagship of Combined Task Force 151, the destroyer Halsey and its HSL-49 helicopter detachment responded to a call of distress from M/V Albrouj, a Yemeni dhow en route to Somalia from Yemen.[65]

Carrier Strike Group One joined Carrier Strike Group Three, led by the carrier John C. Stennis, in the North Arabian Sea, with Carrier Strike Group Nine, led by the carrier Abraham Lincoln, en route to the Arabian Sea amid rising tension between the United States and the Islamic Republic of Iran over U.S. naval access to the Strait of Hormuz.[66]

Malabar 2012 (16 April 2012)

While with the Seventh Fleet, between 9–16 April 2012, Carrier Strike Group One participated in Malabar 2007 with the Indian Navy (pictured).[67] Ships of the strike group paid a port visit to Brisbane on 5 May 2012 to mark the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Coral Sea.[68] Between 7–16 May 2012, Carrier Strike Group One became the first U.S. Navy carrier strike group to participate in the Oceania Maritime Security Initiative, a maritime law enforcement operation within the exclusive economic zones of various South Pacific states.[69]

On 11 May 2012, Carrier Strike Group One entered the U.S. Third Fleet area of responsibility.[70] On 23 May 2012, the carrier Carl Vinson, the cruiser Bunker Hill, and the destroyer Halsey returned to Naval Air Station North Island, California, concluding the six-month-long 2011–2012 deployment for Carrier Strike Group One.[71] During this deployment, aircraft from Carrier Strike Group One flew 1,085 missions in support of ground forces in Afghanistan, totaling 6,600 flight hours, while delivering 7,283 pounds (3.3 MT) of ordnance and expending 1,717 rounds of 20-mm ammunition in support of coalition operations in Afghanistan.[70][72]

2011–2012 deployment force composition[46][62][73]
CARSTRKGRU 1 Warships Carrier Air Wing Seventeen(CVW-17) squadrons embarked aboard flagship USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)
USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) Strike Fighter Squadron 113 (VFA-113): 10 F/A-18C Electronic Attack Squadron 134 (VAQ-134): 4 EA-6B
USS Halsey (DDG-97) Strike Fighter Squadron 81 (VFA-81): 10 F/A-18E Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 (VAW-125): 4 E-2C
Strike Fighter Squadron 25 (VFA-25): 10 F/A-18C Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 15 (HS-15): 7 HH-60F/SH-60F
Strike Fighter Squadron 22 (VFA-22): 12 F/A-18F Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 (VRC-40), Det.4: 2 C-2A
2011–2012 deployment exercises and port visits
Number Regional Exercises Port Visits Notes
Duration U.S. Force Bilateral/Multilateral Partner(s) Operating Area Location Dates
1st: Carrier Strike Group One Hong Kong 27–30 Dec 2011 [72][74]
2nd: Carrier Strike Group One Jebel Ali, UAE 19–21 Feb 2012 [72]
3rd: Carrier Strike Group One Jebel Ali, UAE 23–26 Mar 2012 [72]
4th: 9–16 Apr 2012 Carrier Strike Group One[Note 3] Malabar 2012: Indian Navy[Note 4] Bay of Bengal Chennai, India 7–8 Apr 2012 [67][72][75]
5th: Carl Vinson, Bunker Hill Fremantle, Australia 24–28 Apr 2012 [72][75][76]
6th: Halsey Brisbane, Australia 5 May 2012 [68]
7th: Carl Vinson Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 15 May 2012 [77]

2012–2014 operations[edit]

Carrier qualifications (25 February 2013)
USS Rentz (18 October 2013)
Flight operations (18 January 2013)
Rescue operations (12 September 2014)
Operation Inherent Resolve (18 October 2014)

On 5 July 2012, the carrier Carl Vinson began a planned incremental availability (PIA) overhaul to undergo major maintenance and modernization, with a scheduled completion date of 1 February 2013.[72][78] The Carl Vinson completed its maintenance on 3 February 2013 and began carrier qualifications with Carrier Air Wing 17 (pictured).[79] Between 2–14 May 2013, the Carl Vinson and Carrier Air Wing Seventeen completed their Underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) pre-deployment exercises.[80]

On 22 March 2012, the cruiser Bunker Hill began its five-month Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) overhaul at the BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair facility.[75] The destroyer Gridley began its selected restricted availability (SRA) yard at BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair facility on 26 June 2013. Gridley began its sea trials on 7 October 2013.[81] On 17 November 2013, the destroyer Higgins began its five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) upkeep.[82] The frigate McClusky completed its three-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) upkeep in January 2013.[83]

On 21 February 2013, Rear Admiral David F. Steindl relieved Rear Admiral Thomas K. Shannon as commander, Carrier Strike Group One in ceremonies held aboard the group's flagship, the Vinson. A surface warfare officer, Steindl had commanded Destroyer Squadron Seven while Shannon takes command of the Military Sealift Command.[24] On 28 January 2014, Admiral Steindl was relieved by Read Admiral Christopher Grady. While in command, Steindl oversaw oversaw the strike group's carrier qualifications that produced more than 1,612 sorties, 1,827 arrested landings, and 2,471 flight hours. A surface warfare officer, Admiral Grady commanded Destroyer Squadron 22 during its deployment to the U.S. Fifth Fleet with Carrier Strike Group Two.[3]

On 25 July 2013, the frigate Rentz began its final deployment prior to its decommissioning in 2014 (pictured).[84] The frigate McClusky participated in a Task Group Exercise (TGEX) with the U.S. and Canadian warships between 7–11 October 2013.[83] The destroyer Stockdale completed an extended 10-month deployment to the middle East on 8 November 2013.[85]

At the start of 2014, Carrier Strike Group One was in port and not underway.[86] On 16 January 2014, USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Air Station North Island, California, to begin its Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) pre-deployment exercise with the Carrier Air Wing 17 and the rest of Carrier Strike Group One.[87] These TSTA training drills and associated real-world scenarios emphasized damage control, flight deck operations, and simulated combat for the units of the carrier strike group, with each training phase evaluated by Afloat Training Group Pacific. Following the TSTA drills, Carrier Strike Group One began its Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) drill. While underway, the strike group flew 1,609 air sorties, including 761 at night (pictured), earning certification from Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific to continue to the next phase of its training. On 10 February 2014, Carrier Strike Group One returned to Naval Air Station North Island, California, completing the TSTA/FEP phase of its pre-deployment exercises.[88]

On 21 March 2014, Carrier Strike Group One completed its three-week-long Fleet Synthetic Training-Joint Exercise. Such exercises allow carrier strike groups to train with other branches of the U.S. military while the ships are in port by connecting to a U.S. Third Fleet simulation gaming network under the supervision of Tactical Training Group Pacific (TTGP) based at Naval Base Point Loma, California.[89] On 2 June 2014, the carrier strike group successfully completed its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California. These exercise evaluated the strike group's ability to react to live-training scenarios as an integral unit throughout every phase of naval warfare including sub-surface, surface, and air scenarios. COMPTUEX is the capstone of the integrated training phase for Carrier Strike Group One, and it required the entire strike group to defeat simulated adversaries across the full spectrum of naval warfare.[90]

On 9 June 2014, the strike group successfully completed its Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the southern coast of California. JTFEX is an integrated battle force exercise designed to test the capabilities of carrier strike groups operating within a joint environment. It represented culmination of months of training for Carrier Strike Group One in preparation for its upcoming overseas deployment later in this summer.[91]

2014–2015 deployment[edit]

On 22 August 2014, Carrier Strike Group One departed on its 2014–2015 deployment to the U.S. Seventh Fleet in the western Pacific Ocean and the U.S. Fifth Fleet in the Indian Ocean.[92] The strike group completed an Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) on 3 September 2014. This exercise included Combined Task Force 32 that provided maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft from the United States, Australia, and Canada. Also, Combined Task Force 32 served as the theater-wide anti-submarine warfare commander during the exercise.[93] On 9 September 2014, Carrier Strike Group One entered the U.S. Seventh Fleet's area of responsibility.[94]

On 12 September 2014, two F/A-18C Hornet single-seat strike fighters collided and crashed approximately 250 nautical miles (460 km; 290 mi) west of Wake Island. One aircraft was from squadron VFA-94 and the other was from squadron VFA-113. Both squadrons were based at Naval Air Station Lemoore, California, and both squadrons were part of Carrier Air Wing Seventeen embarked aboard the carrier Carl Vinson. One aviator was recovered in fair condition and received medical treatment aboard the Carl Vinson. Search-and-rescue (SAR) operations continued for the other aviator (pictured). The strike group was participating in Exercise Valiant Shield 2014 at the time of the mid-air collision.[95] The search was called off on 14 September 2014, and the missing aviator was declared missing and presumed dead, with the crash incident under investigation.[96]

Following a port visit to Singapore, Carrier Strike Group One entered the U.S. Fifth Fleet's area of responsibility on 15 October 2014.[97] On 18 October 2014, Carrier Strike Group One relieved Carrier Strike Group Two as Task Force 50 in the Persian Gulf.[98] On 19 October 2014, Carrier Strike Group One began flying air combat missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S.-led air campaign against ISIL in Iraq and Syria (pictured).[87]

2014–2015 deployment force composition[7][92]
CARSTRKGRU 1 Warships Carrier Air Wing Seventeen (CVW-17) squadrons embarked aboard flagship USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)
USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) Strike Fighter Squadron 113 (VFA-113): 10 F/A-18C[Note 5] Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 (VAW-125): 4 E-2C
USS Dewey (DDG-105) Strike Fighter Squadron 94 (VFA-94): 10 F/A-18C[Note 6] Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 73 (HSM-73): 11 MH-60R
USS Sterett (DDG-104) Strike Fighter Squadron 81 (VFA-81): 12 F/A-18E Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 15 (HS-15): 7 MH-60S
USS Gridley (DDG-101) Strike Fighter Squadron 22 (VFA-22): 12 F/A-18F Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 (VRC-40): 2 C-2A
EOD Mobile Unit 3 Electronic Attack Squadron 139 (VAQ-139): 5 EA-18G ——
2014–2015 deployment operations, exercises, and port visits
Number Operations/Regional Exercises Port Visits Notes
Duration U.S. Force Joint/Bilateral/Multilateral Partner(s) Operating Area Location Dates
1st: 31 Aug – 3 Sep 2014 Carrier Strike Group One Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX): CTF-32 & CTF-34 Mid-Pacific Ocean [93]
2nd: 15–23 Sep 2014 Carrier Strike Group One Valiant Shield 2014: PACOM Marianas Islands Singapore 2–7 Oct 2014 [95][97][87][99]
3rd: 19 Oct 2014 Carrier Strike Group One Operation Inherent Resolve: CENTCOM North Arabian Sea Jebel Ali, UAE [Note 7] [87][100]
4th: 8-10 Nov 2014 Dewey, Gridley IMCMEX 2014: Various[Note 8] Gulf of Aden Duqm, Oman[Note 9] 24 Oct 2014 [101][102]
5th: Bunker Hill Jebel Ali, UAE 14–18 Nov 2014 [103]
6th: 11 Dec 2014 Sterett People's Liberation Army Navy of China[Note 10] Gulf of Aden Manama, Bahrain 29 Nov to 3 Dec 2014 [100]
7th: Gridley 5–9 Dec 2014 Muscat, Oman [102]
8th: 13 Dec 2014 Dewey USS Boise (SSN-764) Suez Canal 29 Nov to 3 Dec 2014 Salalah, Oman [101][104]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ The motto of Mississippi.
  2. ^ As of 2014, Destroyer Squadron One consists of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Stockdale (DDG-106), USS Gridley (DDG-101), USS Higgins (DDG-76), USS Benfold (DDG-65), and USS Russell (DDG-59), as well as the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates USS Rentz (FFG-46), USS Gary (FFG-51), and USS McClusky (FFG-41).
  3. ^ U.S. naval vessels included the carrier Carl Vinson, the cruiser Bunker Hill, the destroyer Halsey, the submarine Louisville, and the fast combat support ship Bridge.
  4. ^ Indian naval vessels included the destroyers Ranvir and Ranvijay; the frigate Satpura; the corvette Kulish, and the fleet tanker Shakti
  5. ^ Original number, with operational loss of F/A-18C on 12 September 2014.
  6. ^ Original number, with operational loss of F/A-18C on 12 September 2014.
  7. ^ 14–18 Nov 2014 for USS Carl Vinson and 19–23 November 2014 for USS Sterett.
  8. ^ USS Dewey with Yemeni Coast Guard patrol vessel Sana'a. USS Gridley with HMS Bulwark.
  9. ^ USS Dewey only.
  10. ^ Frigate Yun Chang (FFG 571) and the fleet oiler and Chao Hu (AOR 890)
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d "Navy Establishes Carrier Strike Group 1". NNS091002-03. Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet Public Affairs. 2 November 2009. Retrieved 23 August 2010. 
  2. ^ "Carrier Carl Vinson One at North Island". Navy Times. 13 April 2010. Retrieved 23 August 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d "CSG-1 Holds Change of Command at Sea". NNS140128-16. Carrier Strike Group 1 Public Affairs. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "Rear Admiral Christopher Grady, USN". Official Biography. United States Navy. 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2014. 
  5. ^ "Captain Robert Sanders, USN". Chief of Staff. Carrier Strike Group One. 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "ETCM(SW/AW) Toby Cadwell, USN". Carrier Strike Group One. 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Morison, Samuel Loring (September 2014). "U.S. Battle Force Aviation Changes 2013-14". Naval Institute Processings 140 (9): 48–50. ISSN 0041-798X. Retrieved 13 September 2014. Registration required; downloadable PDF file. 
  8. ^ "The Carrier Strike Group". Navy Data. U.S. Navy. 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2011. 
  9. ^ "Current DESRON ONE Ships". COMDESRON ONE. U.S. Navy. 2012. Retrieved 8 June 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c "Carrier Group One". Military. GlobalSecurity.org. 26 April 2005. Retrieved 8 January 2011. 
  11. ^ "Naval Aeronautical Organization – 1933" (PDF). Op-38-ED-u/(SC)-VZ/A-31. Washington Naval Yard: Naval History & Heritage Command. 1 May 1931. p. 6. Retrieved 11 July 2011. 
  12. ^ "Shake Down and Operation Frostbite". Midway History and Events. CV41.org. 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2012. 
  13. ^ Roy A., Grossnick (1995), "Part 6: Postwar Years 1946–1949", United States Naval Aviation, 1910–1995 (PDF) (Washington, DC: Naval Historical Center): 160 
  14. ^ See Thomas A. Bryson, Tars, Turks, and Tankers: The Role of the United States Navy in the Middle East, 1800–1979, Scarecrow, 1980, 92–95.
  15. ^ Captain Paul Ryan, USN (November 1974). "An interview with Captain Henri H. Smith-Hutton, regarding his command of the U.S.S. Little Rock". Oral History Program. USS Little Rock Association. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  16. ^ Chace, James (2006). "Part 1 – First Skirmishes: The Day the Cold War Started". In Cowley, Robert. The Cold War: A Military History. New York: Random House. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-81296-716-6. 
  17. ^ Naval Aeronautical Organization OPNAV NOTICE 05400 for Fiscal Year 1956 dated 1 August 1955, 19.
  18. ^ "OPNAV NOTICE C5400: Naval Aeronautical Organization for January 1974" (PDF). Aviation Ships: U.S. Pacific Fleet, Aircraft Carriers (Washington, DC: Office of the Chief of Naval Operations): 172. January 1974. Retrieved 1 March 2011. 
  19. ^ Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, USS Midway
  20. ^ Curtis A. Utz and Mark L. Evans (July–August 2005). "The Year in Review 2004". Naval Aviation News. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Navy. Retrieved 9 November 2010. Aviation Command Changes, 2004 
  21. ^ Lt. Cmdr. Gabe E. Soltero, USN (15 February 2005). "Strike Force Training Pacific Changes Command on Reagan". NNS050215-07. Strike Force Training Pacific Public Affairs. Retrieved 7 January 2011. 
  22. ^ a b c Journalist Daniel Bristol (28 October 2010). "Carrier Strike Group One Conducts Change of Command Ceremony". NNS060607-16. USS Carrier Strike Group One Public Affairs. Retrieved 30 October 2014. 
  23. ^ a b c d "Carrier Strike Group 1 Conducts Change of Command". NNS111119-03. Carrier Strike Group 1 Public Affairs. 19 November 2011. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  24. ^ a b c "Carrier Strike Group One Holds Change of Command". NNS130221-33. Carrier Strike Group 1 Public Affairs. 21 February 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
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